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Pauline Trigere

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pauline Trigere, the French-born fashion design legend who personified American style, died Wednesday of natural causes at her Manhattan apartment. She was 93, but regularly defied her age. Just five months ago, Trigere (pronounced Tree-zhair) demonstrated her awe-inspiring cutting technique to design students at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, recalled Jimmy Newcomer, an associate professor of fashion design.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2002 | VALLI HERMAN-COHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pauline Trigere, the French-born fashion design legend who personified American style, died Wednesday of natural causes at her Manhattan apartment. She was 93, but regularly defied her age. Just five months ago, Trigere (pronounced Tree-zhair) demonstrated her awe-inspiring cutting technique to design students at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York, recalled Jimmy Newcomer, an associate professor of fashion design.
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NEWS
August 9, 1985 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Staff Writer
It was not a typical day for New York designer Pauline Trigere, who nonetheless was dressed for one. Trigere does not alter her style to suit her surroundings.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | SAMANTHA CRITCHELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fashion designer Pauline Trigere is putting her stylish stamp on some traditionally unstylish--and, in some cases, downright ugly--accessories that are commonly used by older people. She is working with Gold Violin, a Web site and catalog company, to make items like eyeglass cases, pillboxes and hearing-aid pouches in printed fabrics and ostrich-embossed leather. "Practicality has always been very important in my life and my designs. You have to make things functional, but that doesn't mean they can't be attractive," says Trigere.
TRAVEL
May 15, 1994
Fashion designers, depending on their mood and their era, move waistlines up or down or just ignore them. They've been doing this since the 18th Century, which is the starting point for "Waist Not," on exhibit at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art through Aug. 21. " 'Waist Not' goes beyond the traditional costume exhibition to tell a larger story--that of the cultural definition of the body and self-esteem," says curator Richard Martin.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | SAMANTHA CRITCHELL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Fashion designer Pauline Trigere is putting her stylish stamp on some traditionally unstylish--and, in some cases, downright ugly--accessories that are commonly used by older people. She is working with Gold Violin, a Web site and catalog company, to make items like eyeglass cases, pillboxes and hearing-aid pouches in printed fabrics and ostrich-embossed leather. "Practicality has always been very important in my life and my designs. You have to make things functional, but that doesn't mean they can't be attractive," says Trigere.
NEWS
November 30, 1990 | KATHRYN BOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It used to be just about impossible for a woman Size 16 or larger to buy a designer-label outfit off the rack. But The Forgotten Woman, a chain of 25 stores that sells large-size women's clothing, is helping to change that. Founder and owner Nancye Radmin was in Palm Desert recently to open a new salon for top-flight designer clothing by, among others, Bob Mackie, Oscar de la Renta, Pauline Trigere, Nolan Miller, Alfred Fiandaca and Geoffrey Beene.
NEWS
April 7, 2000 | BARBARA THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every year, women's-wear manufacturer A.B.S. picks the best Oscar dresses and comes out with its own versions. And before you snort "knockoff," A.B.S. founder and designer Allen B. Schwartz justifies the practice by reminding us that his generally young customers can't afford designer gowns anyway. The A.B.S. gowns are a reflection of who looked best on Oscar night.
NEWS
September 25, 1998 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Steven Stolman isn't sure if people west of the Hudson River will understand his clothes, which are made of printed upholstery fabrics--florals, chintzes, toile de Jouys, chinoiseries or those with neoclassical motifs. His shops in Southampton, Mass.; Nantucket, Mass.; Palm Beach, Fla.; and Manhattan cater to what used to be called "the carriage trade." (He still calls it that.
MAGAZINE
December 21, 1986 | PADDY CALISTRO
A new twist on a classic hairdo has become the look for the holidays. The French twist, a prominent style at the recent European ready-to-wear collections, has caught on as a favorite of the Milanese and Parisian boutique set and is now taking Beverly Hills by storm. Cristophe, owner of Salon Cristophe on Beverly Drive, says that each of his three upsweep specialists twirl at least a dozen twists a day.
TRAVEL
May 15, 1994
Fashion designers, depending on their mood and their era, move waistlines up or down or just ignore them. They've been doing this since the 18th Century, which is the starting point for "Waist Not," on exhibit at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art through Aug. 21. " 'Waist Not' goes beyond the traditional costume exhibition to tell a larger story--that of the cultural definition of the body and self-esteem," says curator Richard Martin.
NEWS
August 9, 1985 | BETTIJANE LEVINE, Times Staff Writer
It was not a typical day for New York designer Pauline Trigere, who nonetheless was dressed for one. Trigere does not alter her style to suit her surroundings.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | THE FASHION STAFF
When Helen Shaver appears as television co-anchor Kelby Robinson in "WIOU," a new fall series set to air Wednesday nights at 10 on CBS, she'll be wearing L.A.-designer clothes. Much of Shaver's wardrobe comes from Jennifer Joanou and Richard Tyler. Pat Welch, the show's costumer, says she hopes the mix of Joanou's soft lines and sheer fabrics with Tyler's more theatrical twist in suits will "inspire some of our TV anchors to sit up and take note."
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