Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPax
IN THE NEWS

Pax

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
September 29, 2009 | Christopher Layne and Benjamin Schwarz, Christopher Layne is a professor of government at Texas A&M and a consultant to the National Intelligence Council. Benjamin Schwarz is literary and national editor of the Atlantic.
The international order that emerged after World War II has rightly been termed the Pax Americana; it's a Washington-led arrangement that has maintained political stability and promoted an open global economic system. Today, however, the Pax Americana is withering, thanks to what the National Intelligence Council in a recent report described as a "global shift in relative wealth and economic power without precedent in modern history" -- a shift that has accelerated enormously as a result of the economic crisis of 2007-2009.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Glenn Close's introduction to short filmmaking involved a Sony Handycam and a spontaneous one-day shoot. "I can't believe my little film is now being shown at film festivals," she laughs on the phone from her home in Maine. Close's 18-minute film, "Pax," is one of the featured presentations at the 16th annual Palm Springs International ShortFest running through Monday. Out of 3,000 worldwide entries, 314 short films are being shown packaged into 52 "themed" programs. Close's film, which she co-directed and narrates, is part of a lineup of animal-themed shorts titled "Animal Attraction" running on Saturday afternoon.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001
Maybe I was abducted by space aliens and had a false memory implanted in my brain (or maybe a few film critics in town were abducted and had their memory banks wiped clean), but why do the plot line and characters of "K-PAX" sound so oddly familiar? A psychiatrist with family problems who finds himself dealing with a mental patient who may or may not be an alien? Is this a whiff of deja vu or maybe a parallel universe? I'm not sure which book this film claims to be based on, but the obvious cinematic progenitor is the very fine Argentine film "Man Facing Southeast," circa 1986, which is about ... a psychiatrist with family problems who finds himself dealing with a mental patient who may or may not be an alien.
OPINION
October 5, 2009
Re "After the Pax," Opinion, Sept. 29 Though I admire the work of Christopher Layne and Benjamin Schwarz, I don't altogether agree with them. Pax Americana unquestionably fathered economic globalism, but the child has dwarfed its papa. There will be instances of old-fashioned nationalism -- as in the throwback worldview of Vladimir Putin -- but money will outwit them every time. With the rise of sovereign wealth funds and the unstoppable growth of nonstate international corporations, both of which drive globalism, I strongly doubt that we are destined to return to a world divided into "spheres of influence."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2010 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Glenn Close's introduction to short filmmaking involved a Sony Handycam and a spontaneous one-day shoot. "I can't believe my little film is now being shown at film festivals," she laughs on the phone from her home in Maine. Close's 18-minute film, "Pax," is one of the featured presentations at the 16th annual Palm Springs International ShortFest running through Monday. Out of 3,000 worldwide entries, 314 short films are being shown packaged into 52 "themed" programs. Close's film, which she co-directed and narrates, is part of a lineup of animal-themed shorts titled "Animal Attraction" running on Saturday afternoon.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2008 | Walter Hamilton
Like other mutual fund companies in the "socially responsible" investing niche, Pax World Management Corp. of Portsmouth, N.H., is bound to follow strict ethical codes in how it picks securities. Turns out its fund shareholders could have benefited from one more criterion: truth in advertising. Pax World agreed Wednesday to pay $500,000 to settle a Securities and Exchange Commission probe into whether its funds misled investors by violating basic principles of socially responsible investing, such as steering clear of alcohol and gambling companies.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003
Tim Rutten's commentary on the Bush-Rumsfeld war plan sounds right on ("Connecting the Dots of Rumsfeld's Theories," April 2). The real driving force behind our war in Iraq is not the removal of a tyrant, the pursuit of oil, the fear of weapons of mass destruction or the spread of democracy. Rather, it is a first step in the desire of this administration to aggressively spread American influence and control throughout the world. Recognizing the danger inherent in using power to establish control (Pax Americana would be no more peaceful than was Pax Romana)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 1999
Steve Allen has a 1st Amendment right to express his opinion, but in this case, he is just flat out wrong! (Valley Perspective Interview, April 25.) In the "Golden Age of Comedy," not only were there no dirty words, but Andy, Opie and Aunt Bea lived in the only town in the South with no black people. Game shows were fabrications, rigged by the sponsors, to attract a following, a fact brought to light only by a more recent film and PBS documentary. Allen advocates supporting "the good."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2002 | MARK SACHS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A disgruntled cyber-hacker with a serious appetite for destruction sets his sights on ultimate revenge tonight in the almost comically dramatic TV movie "Terminal Error" (8 p.m., PAX). Timothy Busfield ("thirtysomething") plays bad guy Elliott Nesher by, essentially, channeling Microsoft's Bill Gates, complete with a sweaty mop of hair, dweebish eyeglasses and omnipresent smirk.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1985
A fool and her money are soon parted. The sooner the better as far as "freezenik" Joan B. Kroc is concerned. Granted it will take some time to deplete Mrs. Kroc's $500 million; meanwhile she will serve Soviet disinformationists well. In less than three weeks, Mrs. Kroc will beat her breast in guilt as she attends "commemorative services" in Hiroshima while daughter Linda Smith leads the well-meaning but ignorant Mothers Embracing Nuclear Disarmament in Balboa Park. On that same day and three days later, I will pray silently (I guess I can do this as long as I'm not in school)
BUSINESS
July 31, 2008 | Walter Hamilton
Like other mutual fund companies in the "socially responsible" investing niche, Pax World Management Corp. of Portsmouth, N.H., is bound to follow strict ethical codes in how it picks securities. Turns out its fund shareholders could have benefited from one more criterion: truth in advertising. Pax World agreed Wednesday to pay $500,000 to settle a Securities and Exchange Commission probe into whether its funds misled investors by violating basic principles of socially responsible investing, such as steering clear of alcohol and gambling companies.
FOOD
June 7, 2006 | S. Irene Virbila
Not quite up to speed on Slovenian wines? Start your collection with this terrific Rizling (read Riesling) from Dveri-Pax, a Slovenian winery founded by the offspring of two great Austrian winemaking families. Erich Krutzler is the former winemaker at the Burgenland red wine specialist Krutzler; his wife is the daughter of F.X. Pichler in the Wachau. Dveri-Pax ("place of peace") is a former Benedictine monastery with a winemaking tradition that goes back more than 850 years.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
NBC Universal said Paxson Communications Corp.'s plan to run infomercials on its Pax TV network violated NBC's sales contracts and would diminish Pax's value. Paxson has notified NBC that it wanted to end contracts that allow NBC to sell local and national advertising slots for Pax TV, NBC said. Paxson, 32% owned by NBC Universal, plans to rely on revenue from paid programming sold by its own sales force. NBC Universal is majority owned by General Electric Co.
SCIENCE
June 4, 2003 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
One of the greatest mysteries of the war in Iraq has been solved. No, not weapons of mass destruction. Salam Pax. He's real. The hip and irreverent Iraqi, whose poignant online tirades skewered Saddam Hussein and George Bush in equal measure, riveted thousands of Internet users before and during the war. His Web diary, or "blog" -- a daily missive perched on the knife's edge between anxiety and hope -- was an overnight sensation.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003
Tim Rutten's commentary on the Bush-Rumsfeld war plan sounds right on ("Connecting the Dots of Rumsfeld's Theories," April 2). The real driving force behind our war in Iraq is not the removal of a tyrant, the pursuit of oil, the fear of weapons of mass destruction or the spread of democracy. Rather, it is a first step in the desire of this administration to aggressively spread American influence and control throughout the world. Recognizing the danger inherent in using power to establish control (Pax Americana would be no more peaceful than was Pax Romana)
NEWS
March 31, 2003 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
A few days after the U.S.-led bombing of Baghdad began, the words of a mysterious man known as Salam Pax raced across the Internet. "One of the buildings I really love went up in a huge explosion," Salam Pax wrote. "I was close to tears.... It does look that the hits were very precise but when the missiles and bombs explode they wreck havoc in the neighborhood where they fall.... Iraqi TV says nothing, shows nothing. What good are patriotic songs when bombs are dropping."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 2001
Re "U.S. Pays the High Price of Empire," Commentary, Sept. 18: I don't usually agree with Pat Buchanan, but I do agree with his analysis in this situation. Our government shouldn't act on rage and impulse and kill innocents as the hijackers did, which may result in more retaliation. We, the American public, have to act calmly in these times and encourage the policymakers to act wisely. I refuse to become, or allow our young soldiers to become, a potential target for terrorists because our policymakers are too busy trying to enforce Pax Americana across the world and appease the defense contractors (whose stocks, incidentally, jumped while almost all others fell in anticipation of war)
OPINION
March 12, 2003
Re "U.S. Finds Allies in Repressive Arab Regimes," Commentary, March 10: Shibley Telhami gives us yet another reason to oppose our administration's war plans. Even our allies -- Pakistan, Egypt, Jordan -- often take "our side" in direct opposition to the expressed desires of their own citizens. Our claim that we are encouraging democracy by removing a repressive ruler in Iraq rings false, and our alliances contribute to instability in the Arab world. Emily Maverick Los Angeles Telhami insists that democracy has to grow from within.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|