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June 13, 1992 | SUSAN KING
In 1960, Paxton Whitehead was a fledgling actor toiling without much success in his native England. "I hadn't done anything of great distinction," admits Whitehead, currently appearing as Helen Mirren's understanding, klutzy doctor in the acclaimed production of Alan Ayckbourn's "Woman in Mind" at the Tiffany Theatre. His biggest claim to fame was a stint in 1958 with the Shakespeare Memorial Theater, now the Royal Shakespeare Company. "But I was the lowest of lows," Whitehead says.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
If there were an honor society for dedicated stage comedians, Paxton Whitehead might well be its grand pooh-bah. With more than three decades' worth of Broadway outings to his credit--well as myriad Shaws, spoofs and even sitcoms--he's tickled more funny bones than you can shake a stick at. Yet the British-born thespian, who first made his mark in 1964 by replacing Jonathan Miller in the classic comedy revue "Beyond the Fringe," hasn't lost his passion for the punch line.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Oh, I hate talking about acting," Paxton Whitehead said over lunch the other day. He had been asked how he prepared for his starring role in "How the Other Half Loves" at South Coast Repertory, which opened last month to positive reviews. Whitehead, a legend in theater circles for his comic genius, sounds veddy British upper crust. His robust bass-baritone voice is remarkable for its cavernous resonance. It gives the impression that he does not suffer foolish questions gladly.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1997 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Oh, I hate talking about acting," Paxton Whitehead said over lunch the other day. He had been asked how he prepared for his starring role in "How the Other Half Loves" at South Coast Repertory, which opened last month to positive reviews. Whitehead, a legend in theater circles for his comic genius, sounds veddy British upper crust. His robust bass-baritone voice is remarkable for its cavernous resonance. It gives the impression that he does not suffer foolish questions gladly.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
If there were an honor society for dedicated stage comedians, Paxton Whitehead might well be its grand pooh-bah. With more than three decades' worth of Broadway outings to his credit--well as myriad Shaws, spoofs and even sitcoms--he's tickled more funny bones than you can shake a stick at. Yet the British-born thespian, who first made his mark in 1964 by replacing Jonathan Miller in the classic comedy revue "Beyond the Fringe," hasn't lost his passion for the punch line.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1987 | Craig Modderno
Gene Hackman mourns the loss of his wife and his road-side diner while waitress Teri Garr attempts to get him over both in "Blue Moon, Light Water," which Peter Masterson directs in Texas in August. . . . Melanie Griffith is a lady of the night who gets involved with gangster/nightclub owner Sting in "Stormy Monday," which starts filming July 6 in London. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
How refreshing. Craig Noel's staging of "The School for Scandal" that opened over the weekend at the Old Globe, under the stars and under the path of airplanes headed for Lindbergh Field, doesn't go for the jugular. It goes for the glitter. Occasionally, it hits the gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1992
Production: George Bernard Shaw's "Heartbreak House" Direction: Martin Benson, "Heartbreak House" Lead Performance: Paxton Whitehead, "Heartbreak House," Richard Frank, "Kiss of the Spider Woman" Scenic design: John Iacovelli, "Heartbreak House," Marjorie Bradley Kellogg, "Pirates" Costume design: Ann Bruice, "You Can't Take It With You," Shigeru Yaji, "Happy End"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1993 | SHAUNA SNOW, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Bookings: A pre-Broadway tour of "My Fair Lady," with Richard Chamberlain as Henry Higgins, has been booked into the Music Center's Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for a July 6-18 run, followed by a July 20-25 run at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The production features Melissa Errico as Eliza, Paxton Whitehead as Pickering, and Julian Holloway as Doolittle, re-creating the role his father, Stanley Holloway, created.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 29, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Three indelible scenes and a central performance dripping in evil rescue Shakespeare's "Richard III," final show of the season to join the Old Globe repertory, from the blandness of pageant/spectacle and bring it into the realm of theater. One is Richard's ill-begotten coronation. It is a stunning display of pomp and blind ambition as Richard ascends the throne, leaving his queen (Deborah May)--the widow of a man he murdered--to crumple to the floor before him.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 1992 | SUSAN KING
In 1960, Paxton Whitehead was a fledgling actor toiling without much success in his native England. "I hadn't done anything of great distinction," admits Whitehead, currently appearing as Helen Mirren's understanding, klutzy doctor in the acclaimed production of Alan Ayckbourn's "Woman in Mind" at the Tiffany Theatre. His biggest claim to fame was a stint in 1958 with the Shakespeare Memorial Theater, now the Royal Shakespeare Company. "But I was the lowest of lows," Whitehead says.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 28, 1989 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
How refreshing. Craig Noel's staging of "The School for Scandal" that opened over the weekend at the Old Globe, under the stars and under the path of airplanes headed for Lindbergh Field, doesn't go for the jugular. It goes for the glitter. Occasionally, it hits the gold.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1987 | Craig Modderno
Gene Hackman mourns the loss of his wife and his road-side diner while waitress Teri Garr attempts to get him over both in "Blue Moon, Light Water," which Peter Masterson directs in Texas in August. . . . Melanie Griffith is a lady of the night who gets involved with gangster/nightclub owner Sting in "Stormy Monday," which starts filming July 6 in London. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2001
* "Contact," the 2000 Tony Award winner for best musical, plays July 8-Sept. 2 at the Ahmanson Theatre, 135 N. Grand Ave., downtown L.A. $25 to $75. (213) 628-2772. * "Twelfth Night," Shakespeare's romantic comedy, with Harry Groener and Paxton Whitehead, plays July 7-Aug. 11 at the Globe Theatres Lowell Davies Festival Theatre, Balboa Park, San Diego. $25 to $50. (619) 239-2255. * The UCLA Film Archive launches "The Cinematography of James Wong Howe" July 11-Aug.
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