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Pay To Play

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BUSINESS
February 9, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher
Two Los Angeles companies embroiled in a New York state pension fund corruption scandal agreed Monday to pay a total of $19 million to settle a state investigation into the "pay-to-play" scheme. Wetherly Capital Group and Markstone Capital Group also agreed to adhere to a public pension reform code created by the New York attorney general's office to halt illegal pay-to-play arrangements, which typically benefit politicians and overly compensate intermediaries. Wetherly and Markstone were not accused and did not admit any wrongdoing in the civil settlement.
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OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If it is true that state Sen. Leland Yee consorted with criminals and did them political favors in return for campaign cash, it is indeed "sickening," as Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg said. But this newest scandal, along with the indictment of Sen. Ronald S. Calderon on bribery and corruption charges in February, is merely an extreme example of the long-standing and pervasive pay-to-play culture that permeates the Capitol. Yee, a San Francisco Democrat, was swept up in an FBI sting targeting a gangster known as "Shrimp Boy" and faces federal charges related to public corruption and conspiracy to illegally import firearms.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989
With the increasing attention to the "pay to play" virus, it's becoming increasingly frustrating to read of club owners griping about barely making ends meet and thus justifying the practice. The problem lies with the clubs' refusal to have one in-house booker; use of a single booker would end the need for outside promoters, who are, for the most part, the greatest perpetrators of the pay-to-play evil. Clubs in areas such as Anaheim, San Pedro and Reseda survive because they use one booker and do their own advertising, along with some pre-sales.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher
A former top New York state official with ties to Southern California securities and investment executives pleaded guilty Wednesday to corruption charges in a still-unfolding "pay to play" scandal. David Loglisci, the chief investment officer at the New York State Comptroller's office from 2003 to 2007, admitted that he violated public trust by basing investment decisions on whether they would benefit former state Comptroller Alan Hevesi and his political advisor, Henry "Hank" Morris, New York Atty.
NEWS
June 17, 1990
Your article on the L.A. metal scene lacks a discussion of perhaps the furthest-reaching, terrible contribution of the metal culture, namely pay-to-play. Bob Sipchen mentions most club owners' practice of making bands pay before granting them stage time, but fails to explain that if it were not for those metal bands that will pay, the arrangement would not exist. As a local alternative/punk fanzine editor, I am constantly made aware of the problems of this peculiarly Los Angeles institution.
OPINION
September 17, 2002
Re "Clearing the Road for Pet Projects," Sept. 9: Now I get it. If I want to have my driveway repaved at taxpayer expense, I make a contribution to the sponsors of Proposition 51--the Traffic Congestion Relief and Safe School Buses Act--so they'll include my "traffic improvement project" in their pay-to-play initiative. Kelly Hayes-Raitt Santa Monica
OPINION
April 18, 2004
Through over 20 years of public service, I have always held myself to the highest ethical standards. Recent allegations that businesses must give campaign contributions in order to successfully win city contracts go against everything that I believe. I simply will not tolerate that behavior in my administration. "Alice in DWP-Land" (editorial, April 14) suggested that the Department of Water and Power awarded a contract to the public relations firm Fleishman-Hillard because it contributed to my campaign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
Let me begin by saying I'm not into spanking. If I suggested to my wife that we give it a try, I'm confident she would spank the side of my head with a frying pan. So maybe I'm not the best person to judge Mike "Spanky" Duvall, the family values crusader from Yorba Linda. He's the unfortunate chap who resigned from the state Assembly last week after he was caught on camera boasting of his sexual conquests and peccadilloes, which include a mistress who wears panties the size of an eye patch.
OPINION
December 12, 2005
Re "Cunningham Figure Gave to Gov., Got 2 Board Seats," Dec. 8 For a man who claimed while he was running for governor that he didn't need other people's money, Arnold Schwarzenegger certainly knows the rules of "pay to play." It's obvious that if the recently resigned Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham (R-Santa Fe Springs) had never been caught on the take, government contractor Brent Wilkes would still be on those two boards that Schwarzenegger placed him on -- seats that apparently cost $35,000 apiece.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera and Walter Hamilton
Investment banker Steven Rattner came to Washington in February to help the Obama administration bail out General Motors Corp. and Chrysler -- and maybe even find a larger role in government for himself. But any larger ambitions are now clouded by a pay-for-play scandal that links the New York state pension fund, a low-budget movie called "Chooch" and Rattner's former private-equity firm. There are no allegations of wrongdoing by Rattner or his former company, Quadrangle Group.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2010 | By Marc Lifsher
Two Los Angeles companies embroiled in a New York state pension fund corruption scandal agreed Monday to pay a total of $19 million to settle a state investigation into the "pay-to-play" scheme. Wetherly Capital Group and Markstone Capital Group also agreed to adhere to a public pension reform code created by the New York attorney general's office to halt illegal pay-to-play arrangements, which typically benefit politicians and overly compensate intermediaries. Wetherly and Markstone were not accused and did not admit any wrongdoing in the civil settlement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
Let me begin by saying I'm not into spanking. If I suggested to my wife that we give it a try, I'm confident she would spank the side of my head with a frying pan. So maybe I'm not the best person to judge Mike "Spanky" Duvall, the family values crusader from Yorba Linda. He's the unfortunate chap who resigned from the state Assembly last week after he was caught on camera boasting of his sexual conquests and peccadilloes, which include a mistress who wears panties the size of an eye patch.
BUSINESS
May 2, 2009 | Walter Hamilton
California and three dozen other states formed a task force Friday to investigate whether the abuses alleged at a New York state retirement fund are taking place at public pension agencies across the country. The announcement marks the latest expansion of a pay-to-play probe that has increasingly revealed California connections. New York Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2009 | Jim Puzzanghera and Walter Hamilton
Investment banker Steven Rattner came to Washington in February to help the Obama administration bail out General Motors Corp. and Chrysler -- and maybe even find a larger role in government for himself. But any larger ambitions are now clouded by a pay-for-play scandal that links the New York state pension fund, a low-budget movie called "Chooch" and Rattner's former private-equity firm. There are no allegations of wrongdoing by Rattner or his former company, Quadrangle Group.
BUSINESS
February 25, 2009 | Associated Press
Sheryl Crow, will.i.am, Herbie Hancock and other entertainers on Tuesday urged Congress to force radio stations to pay performers when their music is broadcast. Satellite radio, Internet radio and cable TV music channels already pay fees to performers and musicians, along with songwriter royalties. AM and FM radio stations pay royalties just to songwriters. "People deserve to be paid when somebody else uses their property," jazz pianist Hancock said.
OPINION
July 8, 2008
Re "$10 for parks?" editorial, July 3 The Times' editorial regarding Assemblyman John Laird's (D-Santa Cruz) state parks access pass highlights the need for stable funding for state parks but dismisses a $10 vehicle surcharge to provide this stability. The rationale? That a comprehensive budget fix is better. But we can't let the perfect get in the way of the good. State parks are a public good. We all benefit from the clean air and water, recreational opportunities and education that they provide.
OPINION
March 28, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
If it is true that state Sen. Leland Yee consorted with criminals and did them political favors in return for campaign cash, it is indeed "sickening," as Senate President Pro Tem Darrell Steinberg said. But this newest scandal, along with the indictment of Sen. Ronald S. Calderon on bribery and corruption charges in February, is merely an extreme example of the long-standing and pervasive pay-to-play culture that permeates the Capitol. Yee, a San Francisco Democrat, was swept up in an FBI sting targeting a gangster known as "Shrimp Boy" and faces federal charges related to public corruption and conspiracy to illegally import firearms.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2005 | Don Shirley
Attention, well-heeled amateur actors: Remember the best and worst times you ever spent as part of a theater audience -- and prepare to emote. The producers of the new movie "The Producers," based on Mel Brooks' Tony-winning Broadway musical, are looking for several hundred people willing to pay big bucks to charity for the possibility of a smidgen of screen time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 2008 | Jack Leonard, Times Staff Writer
More than four years after an investigation into "pay-to-play" allegations rocked Los Angeles City Hall, the only trial of a government official in the long-running saga opened Wednesday with prosecutors accusing the former power broker of accepting $100,000 in bribes. Prosecutors told jurors that Leland Wong took the money from Evergreen Group -- a Taipei, Taiwan-based shipping firm -- which was seeking to renegotiate its lease at the Port of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 2007 | STEVE LOPEZ
I'm almost sorry to have to report this news: The Glendale tree-trimming saga, one of my favorite bureaucratic nightmare stories of all time, has come to a happy close. After a showdown Monday with the city attorney, there will be no $347,600 fine for Ann and Mike Collard.
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