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Payne Stewart

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SPORTS
June 19, 1987 | Jim Murray
Golf is the most exasperating game known to man. First of all, it's perverse. You hit the ball right to make it go left, up to make it go down, hard to make it go easy, easy to make it roll on and on. It is a game of compromises. Ben Hogan said if you hit five good shots a round, you have probably played as well as you can. The tolerances are infinitesimal. Perfection is a mirage. Sam Snead said it is a game where you have to play your foul balls.
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SPORTS
June 13, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
ARDMORE, Pa. - Phil Mickelson, who has already wrapped up the father-of-the-year title, was the leader in the clubhouse after the rainy first day of the U.S. Open here Thursday. It was storybook stuff. The golf wasn't bad, either. Mickelson, for the better part of the last two decades among the top golfers in the world, has won four major championships, but never a U.S. Open. Winning one would round out a legacy of his three Masters and one PGA title. Not that he hasn't been close.
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NEWS
November 29, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering little to better explain the mysterious plane crash 13 months ago that killed golfer Payne Stewart and five others, federal investigators on Tuesday confirmed long-held suspicions that the accident probably was caused by a loss of cabin pressurization. National Transportation Safety Board investigators had said privately for months that the Learjet 35 apparently depressurized as it reached 39,000 feet after taking off from Orlando, Fla., on Oct. 25, 1999, on a planned flight to Texas.
SPORTS
September 7, 2011 | By Houston Mitchell
Notable athletes who have died in a plane crash: Oct. 18, 1925 -- Marvin Goodwin, Cincinnati Reds pitcher. Goodwin was one of the 17 pitchers allowed to continue throwing the spitball after it was outlawed in 1920. He died in Houston after crash-landing his plane in a training exercise with the Army Air Reserve. Believed to be the first pro athlete killed in a plane crash. May 4, 1949 -- 22 members of the Torino soccer club. The entire team was killed when its plane crashed into a mountain near Torino, Italy, near the end of league play in Serie A, which immediately canceled the rest of the season and declared Torino the champions.
SPORTS
April 16, 1990 | From Associated Press
Payne Stewart's putter wasn't working all day, until he needed it most. Stewart birdied both playoff holes to beat Larry Mize and Steve Jones Sunday and become the first golfer to win the $1-million Heritage tournament two consecutive years. "I didn't make any putts all day long and then, all of a sudden, boom, boom," Stewart said. "It's very special. I'm very pleased with the way I played." Stewart, who started the day two strokes in front, nearly had a hole-in-one on No.
SPORTS
June 15, 2000 | THOMAS BONK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After the last putt on the last hole of the last round on the last day of the last U.S. Open on Father's Day last June, Phil Mickelson felt his face squeezed hard by Payne Stewart. Stewart looked squarely into Mickelson's eyes and started talking. "He said, 'You're going to be a wonderful father. . . . It's the greatest thing you can imagine,' " said Mickelson, who blinked at, well, the timing of Stewart's message.
SPORTS
April 12, 1985 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
It looked for a while Thursday as if the first round of the Masters was going to turn into "Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour." But then a couple of lesser-known but highly visible pros recaptured center stage for the guys who make a living at this game, and Tom Watson, Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino, Gary Player, Raymond Floyd, Billy Casper and Ben Crenshaw took it from there. Payne Stewart was the first to break the early hold that unfabled amateurs Sam Randolph Jr.
SPORTS
May 4, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
At the time of his famous father's unusually public death, Aaron Stewart was 10 years old, a fifth-grader. "I was in class and I got called into the principal's office," Payne Stewart's only son recalls of that nightmarish moment nearly a decade ago. "I thought I was in trouble." If only it had been so. Instead, he soon learned what millions of television viewers already knew: His father, one of golf's most recognizable figures and winner of three major championships, was gone. It was Oct.
NEWS
October 28, 1999 | BILL PLASCHKE
It was the clothes. Payne Stewart's story was about the clothes. He was what he wore. He wasn't an athlete, he was a mannequin. That's what I always thought. That's what a lot of people thought. He wasn't the guy with the swing, he was the guy in the knickers. Until I walked with him through the North Carolina woods one rainy Sunday afternoon in June. When the walk started, I couldn't stop looking at the white knee socks and jaunty blue cap.
SPORTS
August 13, 1990 | GENE WOJCIECHOWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The other Australian won the 1990 PGA Championship Sunday. His name is Wayne Grady, not to be confused with his more celebrated countryman, Greg Norman, whose exotic nickname, seven-digit earnings and gleaming smile are known worldwide. But now they have at least something else in common: an equal number of major championships--one. Grady won his while Norman, who had finished earlier in the day, was airborne in his private jet.
SPORTS
June 16, 2009 | BILL DWYRE
Time has a way of always moving on, but never traveling far. Consider that it has been 10 years since William Payne Stewart, dressed in motoring cap and plus-fours, etched his way into our hearts and minds with a fist pump and leg kick that celebrated his successful 15-foot putt and ended one of the most dramatic U.S. Open golf tournaments ever. Consider what happened next: Stewart went immediately to the man he beat with his 15-foot putt.
SPORTS
May 4, 2009 | JERRY CROWE
At the time of his famous father's unusually public death, Aaron Stewart was 10 years old, a fifth-grader. "I was in class and I got called into the principal's office," Payne Stewart's only son recalls of that nightmarish moment nearly a decade ago. "I thought I was in trouble." If only it had been so. Instead, he soon learned what millions of television viewers already knew: His father, one of golf's most recognizable figures and winner of three major championships, was gone. It was Oct.
SPORTS
June 12, 2005 | Thomas Bonk, Times Staff Writer
When Payne Stewart arrived at Pinehurst six years ago for the U.S. Open, he hadn't forgotten what had happened to him at the previous Open. He'd had a four-shot lead to start the last round at San Francisco's Olympic Club but shot 74 and was passed by Lee Janzen, who closed with a 68. Stewart was unhappy, from the tip of his tam o' shanter to the bottoms of his trademark plus fours, since he had led after each of the first three rounds.
SPORTS
June 2, 2005 | THOMAS BONK
Before there was the image seared on the television screen, the one that showed the smiling, leaping Phil Mickelson at the 18th green of Augusta National celebrating the putt that won the Masters a year ago, there was another version that many witnessed but few remember. It was the Phil of defeat. The picture is 6 years old now, but it's still fresh. Mickelson is standing on the 18th green at Pinehurst No. 2 on the last day of the 1999 U.S.
SPORTS
June 2, 2001 | From Associated Press
Paul Azinger's most dramatic moment in golf came at the Memorial eight years ago when he dropped a shot in from a greenside bunker to defeat his close friend, Payne Stewart. He talked fondly about it the day before this year's Memorial in a ceremony honoring Stewart. Then he went out and began trying to win a tournament that means so much to him.
NEWS
November 29, 2000 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering little to better explain the mysterious plane crash 13 months ago that killed golfer Payne Stewart and five others, federal investigators on Tuesday confirmed long-held suspicions that the accident probably was caused by a loss of cabin pressurization. National Transportation Safety Board investigators had said privately for months that the Learjet 35 apparently depressurized as it reached 39,000 feet after taking off from Orlando, Fla., on Oct. 25, 1999, on a planned flight to Texas.
NEWS
October 26, 1999 | ERIC SLATER and ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Learjet carrying U.S. Open golf champion Payne Stewart and at least four others flew uncontrolled for nearly five hours above the nation's heartland Monday--its windows iced over, its radio silent and its passengers and crew apparently unconscious or dead--before running out of fuel and plummeting 45,000 feet into a muddy field of weeds near Mina, S.D. All those aboard were killed.
NEWS
October 27, 1999 | ERIC MALNIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Previous problems with valves like the one that may have failed, causing catastrophic decompression aboard the executive jet carrying Payne Stewart, were reported Tuesday as federal experts began their investigation of the crash that killed the pro golfer and five others.
SPORTS
November 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Thanks to Tiger Woods and his yearlong dominance of golf, this year's edition of the $5-million Tour Championship is more like the combination of an All-Star game and an ATM machine. Don't tell that to Stewart Cink. "Outside of a major, this would mean the most to me," Cink said Wednesday. Cink is enjoying the best season of his career.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2000 | Deniene Husted, (714) 520-2508
The entrance to the Coyote Hills Golf Course has been renamed in honor of PGA player Payne Stewart, a two-time U.S. Open champion who died in a plane crash last October. The City Council voted Tuesday to rename Masters Drive to Payne Stewart Drive at the request of Unocal, which owns the course. Stewart, known for his trademark knickers and cap, helped with the construction of the course southeast of Bastanchury Road and Brea Boulevard. Unocal will pay the costs of replacing the street signs.
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