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Peace Treaty

OPINION
November 19, 2006
Re "Toll mounts in Mexico's drug war," Nov. 14 For the drug war, there is a simple and relatively easy solution to end the violence caused by it: legalization. The legalization of now-illegal drugs would allow us to regulate, control and tax the in-demand products. When is the last time you had a story about a liquor dealer shooting his liquor distributor? Probably about 1933, the year that ended the disaster known as Prohibition. Our war on drugs is not winnable. Wars on poverty or drugs cannot be won. Who is going to surrender and sign the peace treaty?
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1986
The campaign by Latin American diplomats to draw up a peace treaty for Central America has been given up for dead many times in the last three years, but only in the United States. Latin political leaders understand the consequences of continued warfare in Central America better than their counterparts in Washington.
WORLD
December 18, 2013 | By Maher Abukhater
BEIT JALA, West Bank - Israel and the Palestinians should be able to reach a basic "framework agreement" for peace by the end of April and a full peace treaty within a year after that, the chief Palestinian negotiator said Wednesday. In a generally optimistic assessment of a peace process that many see as quixotic, Saeb Erekat said a framework agreement would include a general accord on core issues, but would leave the details of implementation to a final treaty. “April 29 is time for a framework agreement,” Erekat told foreign reporters in this West Bank town near Bethlehem.
WORLD
April 23, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Amid the collapse of a multibillion-dollar natural gas agreement between Egypt and Israel that had been in place since 2005, officials from both countries stressed Monday that the dispute was a commercial one and did not reflect political tensions. But observers viewed the contract spat as the latest sign of souring relations between the two countries and said it could threaten the long-term viability of their historic 1979 Camp David peace accord. Tensions between the two countries have been rising since the ouster last year of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who maintained close ties with Israel despite the relationship's unpopularity with the Egyptian public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
Re "North Won't Deal While U.S. Troops Stay," Commentary, Aug. 16: We should listen and act on Hwal Woong Lee's assertion that it is the strong U.S. military presence in South Korea that forms a major barrier to reunification and peace on the Korean peninsula. U.S. taxpayers have carried this burden too long. If South Korea still needs our soldiers to stop a North Korean invasion through the Seoul corridor they do not deserve our continued support. It is time the 1953 armistice was replaced with a peace treaty and the Forgotten War brought to a final closure.
NEWS
October 4, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Israel and Jordan, consolidating what President Clinton called a "warm peace" between former enemies, announced on Monday joint economic and environmental projects intended to give their citizens a tangible dividend from the end of 46 years of hostility. Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and Jordan's Crown Prince Hassan completed work on the measures in a meeting at the White House with Clinton and other U.S. officials.
OPINION
July 12, 1998
Re "Marchers Vow to Beat Blockade in N. Ireland," July 6: The blockade on Garvaghy Road is a great testament to the apparent desire of Tony Blair's and Mo Mowlam's government to create a real peace in Northern Ireland. Any lasting peace will exist only when Protestant Orangemen realize that they can no longer trample upon their Catholic neighbors. The Orangemen's historic march on Garvaghy Road, which they have persisted upon despite the availability of other routes, is designed not to celebrate an ancient military victory, but to assert dominance of their culture over another.
OPINION
July 25, 2003
"Many Disillusioned by Jordan's 'Democracy' " (July 22) should be required reading at the White House and State Department. It clearly documents that if the state of Jordan had a democracy of the people, then Jordan's friendship with the United States and the peace treaty with the state of Israel would disappear overnight. One may rationally conclude that democracy cannot save the Middle East at this time. Right now the Middle East needs good-hearted, fair-minded, peace-seeking, live-and-let-live leaders to allow the region to live and develop in peace.
NEWS
November 15, 1994
After 19 years of war, and nearly a year of tortuous negotiations, leaders of Angola's government and rebel forces are tentatively scheduled to sign a U.N.-brokered peace treaty Sunday in Lusaka, the capital of Zambia. If all goes as planned, a cease-fire will take effect two days later, ending Africa's longest civil war. The plan calls for power-sharing between the government of President Jose Eduardo dos Santos and the rebel UNITA movement led by Jonas Savimbi.
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