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Peace Treaty

OPINION
November 27, 2012
Re "Renew the peace process? Not now," Opinion, Nov. 25 Chuck Freilich is correct that the prospects for peace between Israel and the Palestinians are small. But in his entire piece he neglects to mention the root cause of the problem: the Israeli occupation and colonization of the West Bank and its blockade of the Gaza Strip. Instead of facing the facts on the ground, Freilich blames Palestinian ideology. He misses Israeli ideology that says Israel has rights to all the land between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River.
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OPINION
November 23, 2012 | By Chuck Freilich
Israelis cynically refer to the repeated rounds of violence with the Arabs as "happiness," as in "it's happy today. " Before the cease-fire, as Hamas fired 1,000 rockets at Israel, it was indeed very "happy. " A diplomatic push put an end to the fighting, with intensive mediation efforts by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon and Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi. If the truce holds, happiness will be behind us, for now. It is standard diplomatic practice to view crises as an opportunity to seek fundamental change in the situation.
WORLD
November 20, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The Gaza conflict has pressured Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi on many fronts: Each rocket Hamas fired into Israel has been a test of Morsi's loyalty. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has also been gauging how much damage he can inflict on Hamas before Morsi responds with more than public statements and diplomacy. And the United States and the West, the source of billions of dollars in aid and possible investment that Egypt desperately needs, are watching to see whether the Egyptian president emerges as a formidable and trusted regional voice.
WORLD
November 14, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Reem Abdellatif
SANA, Yemen -- The Israeli killing of Hamas' military chief Ahmed Jabari in the Gaza Strip on Wednesday came amid a much-altered political landscape in the Arab world, especially in Islamist-led Egypt looking to regain its regional prominence. The Muslim Brotherhood, which has long had close ties to Hamas, became the  dominant force in Egypt after last year's overthrow of Hosni Mubarak. Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi is certain to encounter increased pressure from ultraconservative Islamists to scrap Egypt's 1979 peace treaty with Israel.
WORLD
July 15, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton met for the first time Saturday with new President Mohamed Morsi in a fresh push to strengthen U.S.-Egyptian relations as the country enters an era of unpredictability in which an Islamist leader is clashing with a secular military over control of the nation. Clinton's talks with Morsi signaled a historic shift from the days when U.S. diplomats visited President Hosni Mubarak, a stalwart American partner on countering terrorism and preserving Egypt's peace treaty with Israel.
WORLD
June 29, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - Egypt's foreign policy under its first Islamist president is likely to change in tenor but not substance, at least in the short term, as the new government can ill afford to strain relations with the U.S. or risk international furor by abandoning Egypt's 1979 peace treaty with Israel. President Mohamed Morsi faces domestic social and financial crises that are expected to eclipse foreign affairs in coming months. Rhetoric against Jerusalem and Washington may sharpen, but Morsi, who ran as the Muslim Brotherhood's candidate, is desperate for Western and regional investment to ease the economic turmoil that has overwhelmed the Arab world's most populous state.
WORLD
April 24, 2012 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
CAIRO - The decorum of diplomacy has devolved into embarrassing headlines and testy one-liners in the increasingly strained relations between Egypt and Israel. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Tuesday that Egypt's Sinai peninsula had become a "kind of Wild West" overrun by militants, terrorists and arms smugglers. Over the weekend, Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman had suggested massing more Israeli troops along the border with Egypt. That drew a bit of mafia parlance from Egypt's military ruler, Field Marshal Mohamed Hussein Tantawi: "Our borders, especially the northeast ones, are inflamed.
WORLD
April 23, 2012 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
JERUSALEM - Amid the collapse of a multibillion-dollar natural gas agreement between Egypt and Israel that had been in place since 2005, officials from both countries stressed Monday that the dispute was a commercial one and did not reflect political tensions. But observers viewed the contract spat as the latest sign of souring relations between the two countries and said it could threaten the long-term viability of their historic 1979 Camp David peace accord. Tensions between the two countries have been rising since the ouster last year of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, who maintained close ties with Israel despite the relationship's unpopularity with the Egyptian public.
OPINION
April 6, 2012 | By Ari Ratner
Sundown Friday marks the beginning of Passover, the commemoration of the Jews' emancipation from enslavement in ancient Egypt. This year Passover falls on a day of enormous significance in the struggle for freedom in modern Egypt — April 6. That date is synonymous with the April 6 Youth Movement — formed in 2008 and named for the date of a planned strike to support Egyptian workers — that became the backbone of last year's Tahrir revolution that...
OPINION
February 15, 2012 | By David Schenker
As 16 U.S. citizens await trial in Egypt for accepting foreign financing to promote democracy, for the first time in more than 30 years there is a serious debate in Washington about whether to end the $1.3-billion annual military assistance to Cairo. There's no debate in Egypt, however. More than 70% of Egyptians, according to a recent Gallup poll, no longer want U.S. funding. By deciding to prosecute Americans, post-Mubarak Egypt has intentionally provoked a bilateral crisis. But the legal assault on U.S.-funded nongovernmental organizations and personnel is merely a symptom of a larger, more serious problem.
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