Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPearl Cleage
IN THE NEWS

Pearl Cleage

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearl Cleage thrives on those messy moments when honesty's rough edges ignite emotionally frank discus sions. "Weird race moments," she pegs them, such as one working itself to a rapid, almost scalding boil during her visit to Westwood's Sisterhood Bookstore. A woman, standing at the fringes of the crowd, her blond hair pinned in a loose chignon, raises her hand at the close of Cleage's reading.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BOOKS
August 7, 2005 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is a regular contributor to Book Review and the author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series, including the forthcoming "Strange Bedfellows."
FICTIONAL settings often involve an invented community superimposed on an actual location, with the name sometimes changed to protect the privacy (or guilt) of the inhabitants. And while Thomas Hardy's Wessex or Anthony Trollope's Barsetshire remind us the technique is not new or exclusively American, some of the more memorable examples that come to mind are from the American South -- most famously William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County standing in for Lafayette County, Miss.
Advertisement
BOOKS
October 10, 1993 | ERIKA TAYLOR
DEALS WITH THE DEVIL And Other Reasons to Riot by Pearl Cleage (Ballantine: $22.; 197 pp.) "All men are capable of abusing women, no matter what they call it, so don't kid yourself about this one or that one being different," Pearl Cleage says in "Deals With The Devil," a collection of essays primarily concerned with race and gender. But wait a second. Are "all men" potential abusers because of our society or because of their nature? What exactly does "capable" mean?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
NOTED playwright and essayist Pearl Cleage has a body of work distinguished by its seamless blending of women's intimate stories and broader political issues. Her most popular plays, "Flyin' West" and "Blues for an Alabama Sky," concern historical black women whose personal circumstances and dilemmas reflect and inform larger societal issues of slavery and racism. For her fans, however, the greatest drawback to Cleage's stage work has been that the emotional bonds formed with her characters end when the curtain comes down.
BOOKS
August 7, 2005 | Paula L. Woods, Paula L. Woods is a regular contributor to Book Review and the author of the Charlotte Justice mystery series, including the forthcoming "Strange Bedfellows."
FICTIONAL settings often involve an invented community superimposed on an actual location, with the name sometimes changed to protect the privacy (or guilt) of the inhabitants. And while Thomas Hardy's Wessex or Anthony Trollope's Barsetshire remind us the technique is not new or exclusively American, some of the more memorable examples that come to mind are from the American South -- most famously William Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County standing in for Lafayette County, Miss.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 2003 | Paula L. Woods, Special to The Times
NOTED playwright and essayist Pearl Cleage has a body of work distinguished by its seamless blending of women's intimate stories and broader political issues. Her most popular plays, "Flyin' West" and "Blues for an Alabama Sky," concern historical black women whose personal circumstances and dilemmas reflect and inform larger societal issues of slavery and racism. For her fans, however, the greatest drawback to Cleage's stage work has been that the emotional bonds formed with her characters end when the curtain comes down.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 1999
"Flyin' West," Pearl Cleage's drama about a household of women who live in an all-black town in Kansas in 1898, closes Sunday at the Pasadena Playhouse, 39 S. El Molino Ave., Pasadena. Today and Friday, 8 p.m.; Saturday, 5 and 9 p.m.; Sunday, 2 and 7 p.m. $13.50 to $42.50. (800) 233-3123.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999
* Music. Impressionistic keyboardist Keiko Matsui plays her jazz-New-Age-world-music hybrid on April 3 at 8 p.m., at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts, 12700 Center Court Drive, Cerritos. $27 to $42. (800) 300-4345. * Dance. Ancient music and dance from the Japanese Imperial Court will be re-created in the program of Gagaku and Bugaku by the Ikoma Gagaku Music Society of Nara on April 2 at 8 p.m. in the Japan America Theatre, 244 S. San Pedro St., Little Tokyo, Los Angeles. $8 to $22.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 1994 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Flyin' West," Pearl Cleage's post-Civil War tale of African Americans who founded the still-existing all-black township of Nicodemus, Kan., offers up a tantalizing story, rich in detail and possibility. San Diego Repertory Theatre realizes some of the potential in Cleage's 1992 play. Its triumphs are the creation of slaves turned pioneers--Miss Leah and Sophie Washington, magnificently played here by Irma P. Hall and Sylvia M'Lafi Thompson. But the play needs judicious cutting and rewriting.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1999
Movies Keanu Reeves and Carrie-Anne Moss, above, star in "The Matrix," a futuristic cyber-thriller set in a universe run by computers where people are merely fuel sources of bio-electric energy. The film, produced by Joel Silver and directed by brothers Andy and Larry Wachowski, opens Wednesday in general release.
BOOKS
October 10, 1993 | ERIKA TAYLOR
DEALS WITH THE DEVIL And Other Reasons to Riot by Pearl Cleage (Ballantine: $22.; 197 pp.) "All men are capable of abusing women, no matter what they call it, so don't kid yourself about this one or that one being different," Pearl Cleage says in "Deals With The Devil," a collection of essays primarily concerned with race and gender. But wait a second. Are "all men" potential abusers because of our society or because of their nature? What exactly does "capable" mean?
NEWS
August 30, 1993 | LYNELL GEORGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pearl Cleage thrives on those messy moments when honesty's rough edges ignite emotionally frank discus sions. "Weird race moments," she pegs them, such as one working itself to a rapid, almost scalding boil during her visit to Westwood's Sisterhood Bookstore. A woman, standing at the fringes of the crowd, her blond hair pinned in a loose chignon, raises her hand at the close of Cleage's reading.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 1997 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Long before Malcolm X proposed separatism as the only possible means for African Americans to live in a society that would recognize their inherent dignity as human beings, African Americans joined post-Civil War mass migrations west to do just that. Pearl Cleage attempts to examine the plight of African American pioneer women protecting their all-black Kansas township in her "Flyin' West," currently at Long Beach's International City Theatre.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1999
Art The hottest ticket in Washington, D.C., hits L.A. today as "Van Gogh's Van Goghs: Masterpieces From the Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam" opens at LACMA West. In this rare display of the museum's holdings outside the Netherlands, 70 paintings will be exhibited, including "Fishing Boats on the Beach at Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer," above. Dance Percussion master Zakir Hussain joins Alonzo King's Lines Contemporary Ballet in the local premiere of "Who Dressed You Like a Foreigner?"
Los Angeles Times Articles
|