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TRAVEL
December 4, 2011
Visitor tips for Pearl Harbor --Because of security, no purses, backpacks, diaper bags, camera bags or other such items are allowed at the visitor center or on the memorials. Bag storage is available for $3. --Carry bottled water. --Dress comfortably and appropriately (no swimsuits). Be prepared to do some walking. --The center is open 7 a.m.-5 p.m. every day but Christmas, Thanksgiving and New Year's Day. --More info: (808) 422-3300, http://www.nps.gov/valr
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer, Jill Cowan and Richard Winton
Westlake High School officials are continuing to investigate an altercation among its football players during a team trip to Hawaii that resulted in allegations of sexual assault and the arrest of one student. More than 150 football players at the Westlake Village school raised funds for a nearly weeklong trip to Honolulu for their first varsity, junior varsity and freshman games of the season. The alleged incident occurred Wednesday night after six or seven varsity players went to a Waikiki hotel room to confront freshman players who had teased a varsity player during a trip to Pearl Harbor, district and police officials said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1991 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Remembering Pearl Harbor: With an eye toward the 50th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor, the Hawaii International Film Festival on Saturday will screen as its closing night event the new film "December," the story of five prep school boys who grapple with war, duty and honor the night after the bombing. Wil Wheaton, one of the stars, will attend along with writer-director Gabe Torres.
SPORTS
August 22, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 A tour of Pearl Harbor was among the activities members of the Westlake High football team took part in on Wednesday in Honolulu. The Warriors are in town to play Waipahu on Friday night in their season opener. It will be the debut of sophomore quarterback Malik Henry, who transferred from Oaks Christian. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The USS Missouri, one of the United States' most iconic warships, this summer marks the 15 th anniversary of its permanent mooring at Pearl Harbor.  The ship saw action in World War II, the Korean conflict, Operation Desert Storm and a motion picture. It arrived in Honolulu in June 1998 and is moored bow to bow with the submerged USS Arizona, sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.  Visitors to the Battleship Missouri Memorial are immersed in the history of World War II, beginning with America's entry into the war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and concluding with the Axis power's signing of documents of surrender on Sept.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Jay Jones
One of the most famous aircraft in American military history -- the Lockheed F-104A Starfighter -- has landed at the Pacific Aviation Museum at Pearl Harbor . The jet arrived on Oahu's Ford Island in early May, becoming the 43rdaircraft to join the museum's collection of historic planes. Starfighters were used by the Air Force from 1958 through 1975. At a length of more than 55 feet, but with a wingspan of just under 22 feet, the jet was dubbed “the missile with a man in it.” It was in an F-104 that Gen. Chuck Yeager made the record-breaking, high-altitude ascent depicted in the movie “The Right Stuff.” The modified, rocket-assisted jet soared to more than 100,000 feet during a test flight in December 1963.
SCIENCE
December 7, 2009 | By Thomas H. Maugh II
The remains of a Japanese mini-submarine that participated in the Dec. 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor have been discovered, researchers are to report today, offering strong evidence that the sub fired its torpedoes at Battleship Row. That could settle a long-standing argument among historians. Five mini-subs were to participate in the strike, but four were scuttled, destroyed or run aground without being a factor in the attack. The fate of the fifth has remained a mystery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1991
Honan got it wrong. The American people do not need an apologist for Japan's dastardly attack on Pearl Harbor (let us not forget the Bataan death march). We should demand an apology from Japan. WILLIAM BOOTERBAUGH El Segundo
NEWS
December 3, 1991
Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor still echoes in the lives of two nations that, more than any others, may influence the future shape of the world. The story of the event and its legacy appears today in "A Sunday in December," a special edition of World Report.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
There is perhaps no greater American monument to the War in the Pacific than Ford Island in Hawaii's Pearl Harbor. The naval base there with its old hangars, runway and control tower - some still showing damage from the Japanese attack that brought the United States into World War II - is on the National Register of Historic Places. Dotted around the island's 450 acres are memorials to the battleships Arizona, Utah and Oklahoma, which were sunk. Docked near the Arizona's submerged hull is the Missouri, the legendary battlewagon and scene of Japan's formal surrender on Sept.
NEWS
July 12, 2013 | By Jay Jones
The USS Missouri, one of the United States' most iconic warships, this summer marks the 15 th anniversary of its permanent mooring at Pearl Harbor.  The ship saw action in World War II, the Korean conflict, Operation Desert Storm and a motion picture. It arrived in Honolulu in June 1998 and is moored bow to bow with the submerged USS Arizona, sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.  Visitors to the Battleship Missouri Memorial are immersed in the history of World War II, beginning with America's entry into the war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and concluding with the Axis power's signing of documents of surrender on Sept.
OPINION
July 6, 2013 | By Michael Fullilove
President Obama's most important foreign policy initiative is his attempt to "pivot" away from the Middle East and toward Asia. Yet in Asia, some are starting to wonder whether the pivot was last year's story. The new secretary of State, John F. Kerry, is rarely sighted in the region. The military elements of the rebalance are underwhelming. Some of the main proponents of the pivot have left government. And U.S. policymakers are still drawn to the Middle East like iron filings to a magnet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2013 | From Los Angeles Times staff and wire reports
Bob Fletcher, who quit his job as a state agricultural inspector during World War II to save the Sacramento farms of interned Japanese American families, died May 23 in Sacramento, his family announced. He was 101. A few months after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, the U.S. government forced Japanese immigrants and Americans of Japanese descent to report to barbed-wire camps in 1942. Many lost their homes to thieves or bank foreclosures. In the face of deep anti-Japanese sentiment - Fletcher was taunted as a "Jap lover" and nearly hit by a bullet fired at a barn - he stepped in to save the farms of the Nitta, Okamoto and Tsukamoto families.
NEWS
May 24, 2013 | By Jay Jones
One of the most famous aircraft in American military history -- the Lockheed F-104A Starfighter -- has landed at the Pacific Aviation Museum at Pearl Harbor . The jet arrived on Oahu's Ford Island in early May, becoming the 43rdaircraft to join the museum's collection of historic planes. Starfighters were used by the Air Force from 1958 through 1975. At a length of more than 55 feet, but with a wingspan of just under 22 feet, the jet was dubbed “the missile with a man in it.” It was in an F-104 that Gen. Chuck Yeager made the record-breaking, high-altitude ascent depicted in the movie “The Right Stuff.” The modified, rocket-assisted jet soared to more than 100,000 feet during a test flight in December 1963.
WORLD
April 1, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and Jung-yoon Choi, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Navy is moving a sea-based radar platform closer to North Korea to track possible missile launches, a Pentagon official said Monday, in the latest step meant to deter the North and reassure South Korea and Japan that the U.S. is committed to their defense. The sea-based X-band radar, a self-propelled system resembling an oil rig, is heading toward the Korean peninsula from Pearl Harbor, the official said. The John S. McCain, a guided missile destroyer capable of shooting down ballistic missiles, also is being sent to the region, said another Defense Department official.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2012 | By Michael Muskal
In just over seven minutes, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt gave voice to a nation's outrage, branding Dec. 7 as a “date which will live in infamy” for Japan's attack on the Pearl Harbor Naval Base. Within an hour, Congress had voted a declaration of war. As he and other presidents before have done in accordance with federal law, President Obama on Thursday proclaimed Dec. 7 as "National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day. " "I encourage all Americans to observe this solemn day of remembrance and to honor our military, past and present, with appropriate ceremonies and activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
The Generals American Military Command from World War II to Today Thomas E. Ricks Penguin Press: 556 pp., $32.95 Deep in his impressive, disturbing study of U.S. Army leadership, "The Generals: American Military Command From World War II to Today," Thomas E. Ricks offers his explanation of why the Iraq war seemed to spiral out of control even after Saddam Hussein was toppled and his army defeated. The fault was not with the U.S. Army's rank and file, Ricks concludes.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2012 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
There is perhaps no greater American monument to the War in the Pacific than Ford Island in Hawaii's Pearl Harbor. The naval base there with its old hangars, runway and control tower - some still showing damage from the Japanese attack that brought the United States into World War II - is on the National Register of Historic Places. Dotted around the island's 450 acres are memorials to the battleships Arizona, Utah and Oklahoma, which were sunk. Docked near the Arizona's submerged hull is the Missouri, the legendary battlewagon and scene of Japan's formal surrender on Sept.
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