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December 2, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES
Oakland Tribune editor Pearl Stewart has resigned from the troubled paper because of what she called a personality conflict with the man who hired her and who has returned as editor in chief after a seven-month absence. Stewart, the first black woman to become editor of a major U.S. metropolitan daily, said she respected the ability of David Burgin, her former boss, but that "it is not possible for me to work with" him.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES
Oakland Tribune editor Pearl Stewart has resigned from the troubled paper because of what she called a personality conflict with the man who hired her and who has returned as editor in chief after a seven-month absence. Stewart, the first black woman to become editor of a major U.S. metropolitan daily, said she respected the ability of David Burgin, her former boss, but that "it is not possible for me to work with" him.
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NEWS
November 4, 1992 | From Reuters
The new owners of the Oakland Tribune newspaper said Tuesday they have appointed the first African-American woman editor of a metropolitan daily in a major U.S. city. The Alameda Newspaper Group said Pearl Stewart, a veteran San Francisco area journalist well known for her dogged reporting, will be the new editor of the Oakland Tribune beginning Dec. 1. "Stewart, 41, thus becomes the first African-American woman to edit a metropolitan daily newspaper in a major U.S.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1992 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One newspaper era ended and another began on Monday in this troubled city east of San Francisco. The 118-year-old Oakland Tribune, which Publisher Robert C. Maynard gallantly struggled to preserve for nearly a decade, published its last issue. In its place comes a slicker version of the paper, now owned by Texas-based Publisher William Dean Singleton's Alameda Newspaper Group. To emphasize the changing of the guard, a caret with the word new has been inserted into the masthead.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1991 | DAVID WALLACE, David Wallace is a frequent contributor to Calendar. and
At 3 a.m., Dec. 7, 1941, Lt. Cmdr. Kenjiro Ono, on the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi 250 miles northwest of Honolulu, heard Bing Crosby sing "Sweet Leilani" on an all-night radio show broadcast from the city. As Bob Hope tells it, it wasn't that Ono, communications officer of Japan's 1st Air Fleet, was a Crosby fan--he was waiting for the weather report. The forecast was good--and so the surprise attack that was to start World War II was on.
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