Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPechanga Indians
IN THE NEWS

Pechanga Indians

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
When last seen in the pages of Helen Hunt Jackson's celebrated historical romance "Ramona," the Indians of this valley were a desperate lot: poor, illiterate, first subjugated by the Spanish, then the Mexicans, then evicted and dumped in a dry canyon by the U.S. government. But one glance at that dry canyon these days tells you that world has been upended.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House of Representatives passed a bill this week that would transfer about 990 acres from the federal Bureau of Land Management to the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista) and passed on a voice vote Tuesday, gives control of two parcels to the band, which owns the Pechanga Resort & Casino. Tribal Chairman Mark Macarro said the land had sacred rock carvings and paintings that the tribe intended to preserve.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A financial officer for the Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula was arrested Wednesday for allegedly embezzling nearly $500,000, Riverside County authorities said. Paul Del Vacchio, 39, of Murrieta was financial controller for the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians' casino, and allegedly funneled $489,000 into his bank account over the last two years, a sheriff's spokesman said. He is expected to be charged today. The resort has 500 hotel rooms and 2,000 slot machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A financial officer for the Pechanga Resort & Casino in Temecula was arrested Wednesday for allegedly embezzling nearly $500,000, Riverside County authorities said. Paul Del Vacchio, 39, of Murrieta was financial controller for the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians' casino, and allegedly funneled $489,000 into his bank account over the last two years, a sheriff's spokesman said. He is expected to be charged today. The resort has 500 hotel rooms and 2,000 slot machines.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 17, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The House of Representatives passed a bill this week that would transfer about 990 acres from the federal Bureau of Land Management to the Pechanga Band of Luiseno Indians. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Vista) and passed on a voice vote Tuesday, gives control of two parcels to the band, which owns the Pechanga Resort & Casino. Tribal Chairman Mark Macarro said the land had sacred rock carvings and paintings that the tribe intended to preserve.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several months of subtle cowboy-Indian skirmishing over access to the coveted collection of the Southwest Museum on Mount Washington, the cowboys are in retreat. The prize in this rivalry is the chance to collaborate with the respected but meagerly funded Southwest Museum, which is looking for a partner to help improve its balance sheet and boost public exposure of its 350,000 western artifacts from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.
NEWS
April 25, 1998 | TOM GORMAN and TOM SCHULTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge on Friday refused to immediately derail an agreement between Gov. Pete Wilson and the Pala Indians allowing some reservation gambling, despite objections from two other California Indian tribes that the pact disregards state and federal laws and infringes on tribes' sovereignty. U.S. District Judge Thomas F.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Pechanga Indians of Temecula on Sunday hesitated on the brink of a pioneering deal to provide up to $1.3 million yearly to the cash-strapped Southwest Museum in exchange for the loan of thousands of artifacts. That decision represents the first setback for a museum building plan that was assembled over a year of negotiations between tribal leaders and museum officials, an alliance that museum authorities say would be the first of its kind.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the cash-strapped Southwest Museum in Los Angeles, stalled in partnership talks with the Pechanga Indians of Temecula and looking for an ally, have set a mid-December deal-making deadline and have invited other institutions to submit rival proposals. Duane King, executive director of the Southwest Museum, said the idea is to clarify the institution's direction and calm supporters who have voiced anxiety over the museum's uncertain status.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2002 | Christopher Reynolds, Times Staff Writer
The Pechanga Indians of Temecula, who in May paused on the brink of a deal to borrow Native American artifacts from the cash-strapped Southwest Museum in Los Angeles in exchange for up to $1.3 million yearly, have backed away from the bargaining table. The ruptured deal appears to put the Southwest Museum's leaders near square one in their efforts to find a financial angel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS
When last seen in the pages of Helen Hunt Jackson's celebrated historical romance "Ramona," the Indians of this valley were a desperate lot: poor, illiterate, first subjugated by the Spanish, then the Mexicans, then evicted and dumped in a dry canyon by the U.S. government. But one glance at that dry canyon these days tells you that world has been upended.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2002 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several months of subtle cowboy-Indian skirmishing over access to the coveted collection of the Southwest Museum on Mount Washington, the cowboys are in retreat. The prize in this rivalry is the chance to collaborate with the respected but meagerly funded Southwest Museum, which is looking for a partner to help improve its balance sheet and boost public exposure of its 350,000 western artifacts from the 18th, 19th and early 20th centuries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|