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OPINION
January 14, 2002
Norah Vincent's latest incoherent rambling ("Alone in a Crowd--and Then on a Plane," Commentary, Jan. 10) said that Charles Bishop's teacher "reportedly advised her students not to be too quick to judge people because of their skin color or religion." Vincent then dismissed the teacher's lesson as "mushy, politically correct pedagogy." Is this the current state of conservative thought in America? Loving your neighbor is considered mushy political correctness? Teaching that prejudice and bigotry are wrong is simply pedagogy?
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2009 | Reed Johnson
If the great children's nonsense author-illustrator Edward Lear had been born in 1912 instead of 1812, tourists today might flock to Southern California to visit "Learville" instead of Disneyland. Like Uncle Walt, Lear dreamed up an entire alternative universe of dream-haunting characters with names like the Yongy Bongy Bo and the Pobble Who Has No Toes and strangely resonant lands populated by monkeys with lollipop paws and green-headed, blue-handed people. Lear's inspired silliness was more than mere child's play.
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SPORTS
June 6, 1992
I am very concerned about the UC Irvine athletic program and the dropping of two vital sports. I am emphatically against such a move. I must tell you there is a great swelling of support for reinstatement of men's cross-country and track. Baseball has given up the fight. Contact has been made with state senators and assemblymen, support is coming from elite athletes, coaches and athletic departments, demonstrations on campus, and petitions and letter-writing campaigns. You just don't eliminate a sport from an athletic department that has the only ethnic balance and meets the pedagogy and philosophical mandate of the people and students.
OPINION
January 21, 2003
Re "Reading, 'Riting and Rap," Jan. 14: I am deeply disturbed that tax money is being spent on such a celebration of ignorance. When will the LAUSD get a clue? These students need guidance, not a teacher who needs to feel "hip." The wasteland called public education grows even more barren. This is the biggest pro-voucher advertisement yet. How insulting to the students. The unspoken message is that the kids can't relate to anything that is beyond the 'hood. These are the students who need the most help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999
Thanks to Ron Unz and Alice Callaghan, initiators of Prop. 227, we were given sound-bite pedagogy and program design for language minority students by popular opinion. Now the passage of 227, with its provision for liability lawsuits against school administrators and teachers, has opened the way to education reform by grand jury ("L.A. Schools Are Abusing Prop. 227, Report Says," July 1). Now that this body of 23 volunteer citizens has used the law to rattle its sabers at LAUSD's bilingual teachers assigned to Model B, the district might as well hang a sign outside the personnel office that says, "Bilingual teachers need not apply."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998
Re "Teach the Teachers," editorial, Nov. 29: Would our society suggest that an intern take a two-week course to "fix" a medical training problem? This "quick fix" idea is an indication that our society sees teaching as a profession based upon quickly learned processes. Learning how to teach reading--the whole package, including research--should be taught in college before a person becomes a teacher. It should be a whole year's course, with practice, so that those skills are internalized so deeply that a new teacher can more easily teach reading while simultaneously learning how to balance the other dozen or so subjects, not to mention learning how to discipline and love children wisely.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2009 | Reed Johnson
If the great children's nonsense author-illustrator Edward Lear had been born in 1912 instead of 1812, tourists today might flock to Southern California to visit "Learville" instead of Disneyland. Like Uncle Walt, Lear dreamed up an entire alternative universe of dream-haunting characters with names like the Yongy Bongy Bo and the Pobble Who Has No Toes and strangely resonant lands populated by monkeys with lollipop paws and green-headed, blue-handed people. Lear's inspired silliness was more than mere child's play.
OPINION
January 21, 2003
Re "Reading, 'Riting and Rap," Jan. 14: I am deeply disturbed that tax money is being spent on such a celebration of ignorance. When will the LAUSD get a clue? These students need guidance, not a teacher who needs to feel "hip." The wasteland called public education grows even more barren. This is the biggest pro-voucher advertisement yet. How insulting to the students. The unspoken message is that the kids can't relate to anything that is beyond the 'hood. These are the students who need the most help.
SPORTS
September 15, 1988 | Jim Murray
It is a conceit of Americans that heroes, like Henry Adams' friends, are born, not made. Environment has nothing to do with it. That may be true. But how come all the great vaudeville comedians and almost all early-day radio humorists came from the Lower East Side of Manhattan? How come the great blues musicians came up the Mississippi out of New Orleans? Why do all the great actors and poets seem to come from England? Why do dancers come from Russia, tenors from Italy, skiers from Austria?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic. He can be reached at christopher.knight@latimes.com
These days, a young artist can barely get arrested, never mind launch a career, without having gone to art school. And usually not just undergraduate art school either. Art, after a century of flourishing on the margins, is now a mature mainstream profession. The MFA--the master of fine arts--is its professional emblem.
OPINION
January 14, 2002
Norah Vincent's latest incoherent rambling ("Alone in a Crowd--and Then on a Plane," Commentary, Jan. 10) said that Charles Bishop's teacher "reportedly advised her students not to be too quick to judge people because of their skin color or religion." Vincent then dismissed the teacher's lesson as "mushy, politically correct pedagogy." Is this the current state of conservative thought in America? Loving your neighbor is considered mushy political correctness? Teaching that prejudice and bigotry are wrong is simply pedagogy?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2001 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is The Times' art critic. He can be reached at christopher.knight@latimes.com
These days, a young artist can barely get arrested, never mind launch a career, without having gone to art school. And usually not just undergraduate art school either. Art, after a century of flourishing on the margins, is now a mature mainstream profession. The MFA--the master of fine arts--is its professional emblem.
NEWS
March 11, 2001 | DEBORAH BULKELEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Vivian Smith's fifth-graders can hear neither their teacher's voice nor the classical music in the background, yet they communicate with ease thanks to an old teaching tool with a new twist. The children at the Mississippi School for the Deaf sign the meanings of words to each other, using flash cards that help them translate their native sign language to spoken, colloquial English.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 1999
Thanks to Ron Unz and Alice Callaghan, initiators of Prop. 227, we were given sound-bite pedagogy and program design for language minority students by popular opinion. Now the passage of 227, with its provision for liability lawsuits against school administrators and teachers, has opened the way to education reform by grand jury ("L.A. Schools Are Abusing Prop. 227, Report Says," July 1). Now that this body of 23 volunteer citizens has used the law to rattle its sabers at LAUSD's bilingual teachers assigned to Model B, the district might as well hang a sign outside the personnel office that says, "Bilingual teachers need not apply."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 5, 1998
Re "Teach the Teachers," editorial, Nov. 29: Would our society suggest that an intern take a two-week course to "fix" a medical training problem? This "quick fix" idea is an indication that our society sees teaching as a profession based upon quickly learned processes. Learning how to teach reading--the whole package, including research--should be taught in college before a person becomes a teacher. It should be a whole year's course, with practice, so that those skills are internalized so deeply that a new teacher can more easily teach reading while simultaneously learning how to balance the other dozen or so subjects, not to mention learning how to discipline and love children wisely.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | CHARLES WOLFE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
All children in Daviess County's elementary schools got piano lessons this year. The idea was to build up brains, not strictly to make music. For the same reason, students began learning to play chess and were regularly exposed to the visual and performing arts. Kindergarten children were taught their ABCs in Spanish as well as English. Everything was calculated to increase neuron connections--literally, pathways in the brain--for learning and remembering.
NEWS
August 30, 1998 | CHARLES WOLFE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
All children in Daviess County's elementary schools got piano lessons this year. The idea was to build up brains, not strictly to make music. For the same reason, students began learning to play chess and were regularly exposed to the visual and performing arts. Kindergarten children were taught their ABCs in Spanish as well as English. Everything was calculated to increase neuron connections--literally, pathways in the brain--for learning and remembering.
BOOKS
December 17, 1995 | Marina Warner, Marina Warner is the author of the recently published "From the Beast to the Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
The old Aristotle decided that a love of wonder was the beginning of wisdom; for this reason he loved myths, which were full of marvels. In "The Name of the Rose," Umberto Eco imagined Aristotle's lost book on laughter and managed to create a comic thriller around the philosophical issue of rationalist irony and skepticism.
BOOKS
December 17, 1995 | Marina Warner, Marina Warner is the author of the recently published "From the Beast to the Blonde: On Fairy Tales and Their Tellers" (Farrar, Straus & Giroux)
The old Aristotle decided that a love of wonder was the beginning of wisdom; for this reason he loved myths, which were full of marvels. In "The Name of the Rose," Umberto Eco imagined Aristotle's lost book on laughter and managed to create a comic thriller around the philosophical issue of rationalist irony and skepticism.
SPORTS
June 6, 1992
I am very concerned about the UC Irvine athletic program and the dropping of two vital sports. I am emphatically against such a move. I must tell you there is a great swelling of support for reinstatement of men's cross-country and track. Baseball has given up the fight. Contact has been made with state senators and assemblymen, support is coming from elite athletes, coaches and athletic departments, demonstrations on campus, and petitions and letter-writing campaigns. You just don't eliminate a sport from an athletic department that has the only ethnic balance and meets the pedagogy and philosophical mandate of the people and students.
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