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NEWS
September 25, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
The Summer London Olympics may have inspired the bouncier among its viewers to take to the trampoline, but parents should not allow its use at home, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. In an article Monday in the journal Pediatrics, the pediatricians group “strongly discouraged” the use of home trampolines. The academy updated previous, similar statements because of the growth of trampoline as a competitive sport and the popularity of indoor trampoline parks. Injury rates at those parks are unknown but should be monitored, the journal article says.
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OPINION
February 25, 2014 | Jonah Goldberg
Down with stakeholders. The American Academy of Pediatrics has come out against affordable healthcare for kids. Retail medical clinics - at drugstores, Wal-Marts, etc. - are cropping up across the nation, thanks in part to the expected longer waiting times and out-of-pocket expenses stemming from Obamacare. And the pediatricians don't like it. "While retail clinics may be more convenient and less costly, the AAP said they are detrimental to the concept of a 'medical home,' where patients have a personal physician who knows them well and coordinates all their care," reported the Wall Street Journal.
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NEWS
June 27, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
TV advertisements for sugary and fatty foods are playing a role in childhood obesity and ought to be taken off the air, a leading group of pediatricians says. In a policy statement released Monday, the American Academy of Pediatrics' Council on Communications and Media rips "the media" for contributing to child and adolescent obesity, ticking off the many ways in which screen time is a negative influence. The group called on doctors to ask Congress and regulatory groups to ban advertisements for junk food and fast food during kids' programming, as well as advertisements targeted to children via cellphone and other media.
NEWS
December 16, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
The American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday warned that pregnant women and children should not drink raw milk and said it supports a nationwide ban on the sale of raw milk because of the danger of bacterial illnesses. The group's statement said it supports federal health authorities “in endorsing the consumption of only pasteurized milk and milk products for pregnant women, infants and children.” The academy also “endorses a ban on the sale of raw or unpasteurized milk and milk products throughout the United States, including the sale of certain raw milk cheeses, such as fresh cheese, soft cheeses and soft-ripened cheeses.” California is among 30 states that allow the sale of raw milk and one of the few that allows it in grocery stores.
NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
The American Academy of Pediatrics wades into the organic food confusion with a paper out Monday to try to guide doctors in their discussions with families about what to eat. It turns out, no surprise, to be an on-the-one-hand this, on-the-other-hand that discussion, with the first point of advice to pediatricians being to encourage patients and their families to eat a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains and low- or non-fat...
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
It seems harmless enough, swallowing a little spoonful of a lovely spice like cinnamon, but the so-called cinnamon challenge, as millions of YouTube viewers know, is not a pleasant gustatory experience.  In clip after clip on the Internet, someone - often a teenager - ingests a tablespoon of the stuff, without drinking fluids, within 60 seconds. A burning sensation triggers the gag reflex. Coughing and sputtering ensues. A cloud of brown powder surges toward the camera.  Most people who try it recover quickly.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The nation's pediatricians have some advice for expectant parents who are considering giving birth to their child at home: Don't. Home birth is not very common in the United States - fewer than 1% of babies are born outside of a medical setting on purpose. But among a certain subset of white women, it's becoming a trendy thing to do. In 2009, 1 out of every 90 babies born to white mothers was born at home, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate was 36% higher than in 2004.
NEWS
August 8, 1991 | SHARI ROAN
Pediatrician Jeanette Wilkins says she has a "plausible" theory to show why the DPT vaccine can cause permanent brain damage. According to her theory, which she bases on a review of DPT studies, children respond differently to the vaccine and can become fully immunized against pertussis at different ages. At 2 months, she says, some infants have inherited enough pertussis antibodies from their mothers that the vaccine triggers an immune-system response to fight off the pertussis infection.
SCIENCE
August 26, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
The American Academy of Pediatrics has shifted its official position on the contentious issue of infant circumcision, stating Monday that the medical benefits of the procedure for baby boys outweigh the small risks. In its first new policy statement on the issue since 1999, the academy said that circumcision reduced risks of urinary tract infections in infants and of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases later in life - and that the complications associated with the procedure were infrequent and mostly minor.
NATIONAL
February 3, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's largest group of pediatricians wants lawmakers to maintain limits on the health care nonphysicians, such as nurse practitioners, can give to children. The American Academy of Pediatrics is encouraging its doctors to work to block legislation allowing people who are not physicians to write prescriptions independently and permit parity in insurance reimbursement.
OPINION
November 24, 2013 | By Richard M. Buchta
In more than 40 years as a pediatrician, I've worked in the military, in a small private practice and in a large multi-specialty group. And I've seen huge changes, both in administrative practices and in treatment protocols. Many of the changes have been just short of miraculous. When I was training to be a pediatrician in the late 1960s and early '70s, I visited wards filled with cases of childhood meningitis - a very serious condition that can lead to death or lifelong neurological complications.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 2013 | By Scott Glover
A Monterey Park pediatrician is accused of doling out prescription-strength diet pills to adults who had no legitimate need for the drug, according to an indictment unsealed Friday in Los Angeles County Superior Court. Dr. Thomas Lin, who operates a pediatrics clinic on Atlantic Boulevard known as “Kid's M.D.,” is accused of illegally prescribing and dispensing a potent stimulant called Phentermine. Two of Lin's employees were also named in the 55-count indictment. Lin could not immediately be reached for comment.
SCIENCE
April 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
The nation's pediatricians have some advice for expectant parents who are considering giving birth to their child at home: Don't. Home birth is not very common in the United States - fewer than 1% of babies are born outside of a medical setting on purpose. But among a certain subset of white women, it's becoming a trendy thing to do. In 2009, 1 out of every 90 babies born to white mothers was born at home, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That rate was 36% higher than in 2004.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
It seems harmless enough, swallowing a little spoonful of a lovely spice like cinnamon, but the so-called cinnamon challenge, as millions of YouTube viewers know, is not a pleasant gustatory experience.  In clip after clip on the Internet, someone - often a teenager - ingests a tablespoon of the stuff, without drinking fluids, within 60 seconds. A burning sensation triggers the gag reflex. Coughing and sputtering ensues. A cloud of brown powder surges toward the camera.  Most people who try it recover quickly.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
BOSTON - The first victim the doctor approached was a slender young woman, her legs exposed and bloody where she fell after the explosions: at the edge of Boylston Street near a mangled stroller and toppled barricades. Dr. Natalie Stavas performed CPR with the help of a stranger until paramedics arrived and loaded the woman, still unresponsive, onto a backboard and headed for the hospital. Stavas, 32, had been near the finish of the Boston Marathon herself. She was covered in sweat and Gatorade, shivering, with numbness descending into her legs.
NEWS
March 21, 2013 | By Monte Morin
The influential American Academy of Pediatrics has recommended legalizing gay marriage on the grounds that it fosters the good health and well-being of children. In a policy statement released Thursday, the AAP declared that "scientific evidence affirms that children have similar developmental and emotional needs and receive similar parenting whether they are raised by parents of the same or different genders. " It wasn't the gender of the child's parents that affected their health as much as it was the child's relationship with their parents, and the parents' relationship with each other, the statement said.
NEWS
August 29, 2010
Parents, lawmakers and media executives are given plenty to think about in the American Academy of Pediatrics' policy statement published Sunday. Kids today are bombarded with inappropriate sexual messages and images, the AAP committee said; everything from graphic sexual lyrics in songs to ubiquitous erectile dysfunction drug advertisements that air all hours of the day and night. "Television, film, music, and the Internet are all becoming increasingly sexually explicit, yet information on abstinence, sexual responsibility, and birth control remains rare," they write.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Soft drinks should be eliminated from schools to help tackle obesity, and doctors should work with their local schools to ensure that children are offered healthful alternatives, the American Academy of Pediatrics said. In a new policy statement, being published today in the January issue of Pediatrics, the academy said doctors should contact school officials and "emphasize the notion that every school in every district shares a responsibility for the nutritional health of its students."
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Monte Morin
Two recent studies linking childhood television viewing to antisocial behavior and criminal acts as adults are prompting some pediatricians to call for a national boob tube intervention. A commentary published alongside the studies in the journal Pediatrics on Monday lamented the fact that most parents have failed to limit their children's television viewing to no more than one or two hours a day -- a recommendation made by the American Academy of Pediatrics. On average, preschool-age children in the United States spend 4.4 hours per day in front of the television, either at home or in daycare.
NEWS
February 5, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Doctors need to talk to their adolescent patients about energy drinks -- especially energy drinks that are mixed with alcohol -- to make sure they understand the risks from consuming them, the American Academy of Pediatrics says. “When mixed with alcohol, energy drinks present serious potential for harm and abuse,” the academy says in a report published Friday in its journal, Pediatrics in Review. For instance, the report sites a 2010 incident in which nine college students were hospitalized in Washington state after they drank a caffeinated alcoholic drink.
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