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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1994 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Continuing aftershocks from the Northridge earthquake have severely damaged the Pediatric Pavilion at County-USC Hospital, prompting its closure by structural engineers Tuesday afternoon. By late afternoon, officials were preparing to move the estimated 60 children in the pavilion to the 331-bed Women's Hospital on the County-USC campus, said public relations director Kristina Balinian. The pavilion also has 15 adult patients in its communicable diseases unit.
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SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
There have been days, since her son Ezekiel was born 11 months ago, that Los Angeles mom Beth Capper has gone without food to keep up her supply. One friend was arrested for stealing some. It's not drugs or alcohol or even baby formula that has put her in such a bind. It's diapers. "There's no way around buying them," said Capper, a 41-year-old single mother who doesn't work because of a disability. Across the country, mothers like Capper are facing the same predicament. According to a report published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, diaper need - the inability to afford to keep a child in clean diapers - affects a "substantial" number of low-income Americans, with nearly 30% of mothers questioned in New Haven, Conn., reporting that they did not have enough for their children.
HEALTH
March 5, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
A thermometer is the only piece of medical technology in most homes, so it's natural for parents to take a child's temperature at the first sign of illness. But increasingly, pediatricians are advising caregivers to think about leaving the thermometer in the medicine cabinet. In a report published last week in the journal Pediatrics, experts cautioned against "fever phobia" and instructed doctors to do a better job of educating parents on the relative insignificance of an elevated temperature.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
It's among every parent's worst nightmares: You turn your back for just a second, and suddenly your child is in the middle of the street. According to a new study, those worries are not unfounded: Jaywalking and darting into the street are the most common reasons children are struck by vehicles, according to a study released at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. More than 5,000 Americans of all ages are struck and killed by cars every year, and many more accidents lead to significant head injuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 2013 | By John Horn
A comprehensive study of violence in movies rated PG-13 has found that gunplay has tripled in such films since 1985, when the rating was introduced, and further concluded that from 2009 to 2012, PG-13 films have contained as much or more violence than films rated R. The study, published Monday in Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, offers a troubling portrait not only of the accelerating levels of violence in...
BUSINESS
June 8, 1985
A memorial Mass will be said today at 2:30 p.m. at the Church of the Good Shepherd, Beverly Hills, for Fred Hutchins Stone, longtime physician and a former president of the Los Angeles County Osteopathic Society. Stone, who died Wednesday, held a variety of posts at local hospitals. He was senior attending physician in the department of pediatrics at Los Angeles County Osteopathic Hospital and head of pediatrics at the old Doctors Hospital.
NEWS
March 4, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Unless they're supervised by adults, children younger than 10 shouldn't use skateboards and those younger than 8 shouldn't use non-motorized scooters, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Non-motorized scooters have soared in popularity--with an accompanying rise in injuries--in the last two years. The recommendations update the academy's 1995 skateboard policy, which says children younger than 5 shouldn't use them at all.
NEWS
October 31, 2011 | By Shari Roan, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Substance-abuse education and screening should be a part of almost every visit between a doctor and an adolescent, the nation's leading pediatricians said Monday. In a statement published in the November issue of the journal Pediatrics , members of the American Academy of Pediatrics said doctors can use a variety of screening tools to inquire into a teen's use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. The statement argues that no level of experimentation with drugs is safe.
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