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NEWS
October 19, 2012
It's among every parent's worst nightmares: You turn your back for just a second, and suddenly your child is in the middle of the street. According to a new study, those worries are not unfounded: Jaywalking and darting into the street are the most common reasons children are struck by vehicles, according to a study released at the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) National Conference and Exhibition in New Orleans. More than 5,000 Americans of all ages are struck and killed by cars every year, and many more accidents lead to significant head injuries.
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NEWS
March 25, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Four out of 10 mothers surveyed began feeding their infants solid food when they were only 4 months old and their still-developing bodies weren't able to process it -- and more than half the moms said they had been advised to do so by a medical professional.  Those are the findings of a survey released Monday by the journal Pediatrics. Considering that the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology all recommend that parents wait to introduce solid food until their babies are about 6 months old, the results suggest that many parents -- along with the doctors and nurses they rely on -- are woefully out of step with the latest medical advice.  Researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent questionnaires to thousands of pregnant women and invited them to take part in the Infant Feeding Practices Study II . Then they checked in with them when their babies were 2, 3 and 4 months old. The responses included in the Pediatrics study were from 1,334 mothers.  Overall, 539 of those mothers -- or 40.4% -- said they started feeding their babies solid food before they turned 4 months old. Those foods included yogurt, tofu, infant cereal, fruits and vegetables, peanut butter, eggs, fish, chicken, meat and even French fries.  Mothers who had been feeding their babies formula were especially likely to introduce solid foods before the four-month mark,...
BUSINESS
June 8, 1985
A memorial Mass will be said today at 2:30 p.m. at the Church of the Good Shepherd, Beverly Hills, for Fred Hutchins Stone, longtime physician and a former president of the Los Angeles County Osteopathic Society. Stone, who died Wednesday, held a variety of posts at local hospitals. He was senior attending physician in the department of pediatrics at Los Angeles County Osteopathic Hospital and head of pediatrics at the old Doctors Hospital.
NEWS
March 4, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
Unless they're supervised by adults, children younger than 10 shouldn't use skateboards and those younger than 8 shouldn't use non-motorized scooters, according to new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics. Non-motorized scooters have soared in popularity--with an accompanying rise in injuries--in the last two years. The recommendations update the academy's 1995 skateboard policy, which says children younger than 5 shouldn't use them at all.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | United Press International
Divers on Thursday rescued and revived a 2-year-old boy who was strapped in a child restraint in his father's truck when it rolled down a boat-launching ramp and into 12 feet of water. The boy was in the icy lake for more than an hour, officials said. Karl Kachmaryk was flown by helicopter to St. Joseph Hospital after his rescue and was in critical condition in the pediatrics care unit.
NEWS
December 26, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times/For the Booster Shots Blog
It will either disappear into the rubbish heap of well-meaning but ill-timed social treatises or mark the beginning of a new age of activism by the physicians who care for the nation's children: the American Academy of Pediatrics on Monday issued a technical report linking "toxic stress" in childhood to a lifetime of mental, intellectual and physical ills, and called on pediatricians "to catalyze fundamental change in early childhood policy and...
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | By Marissa Cevallos, HealthKey
Giving that 24-month-old a bottle may seem like a good idea at the time. It's familiar, easy and reassuring to the budding toddler. But a new study suggests that prolonged bottle use may have repercussions down the road. Researchers from Ohio State University College of Public Health assessed data from a study of 6,750 children on lifestyle habits and height and weight, finding that about 22% still drank from a bottle at 24 months. By age 5 1/2, 22.9% of children who were drinking from a bottle at 24 months were obese, compared to 16.1% of children who were not drinking from a bottle at age 2. The results were published online Thursday in the Journal of Pediatrics .  The researchers wrote: "Prolonged bottle use may lead to the child consuming excess calories, particularly when parents are using the bottle to comfort the child rather than to address the child's hunger or nutritional needs.
SCIENCE
July 29, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Every day, 34 children are treated in U.S. emergency rooms for choking on food, and the food they're most likely to be choking on is candy, according to a new study. Hard candy accounted for 15.5% of the nonfatal choking incidents documented in a report published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, making it the food item most frequently cited. No. 2 was “other candy,” which caused an additional 12.8% of choking incidents requiring serious medical attention. By the time kids were 4 years old, a whopping 55.2% of choking incidents involved some kind of candy.
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