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Peer Review

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1989 | ROBERT STEINBROOK, Times Medical Writer
They can change the course of medicine, influence the careers of researchers, and determine the for tunes of pharmaceutical manufacturers and their stockholders. They are the powerful biomedical journals, such as the New England Journal of Medicine and Nature, whose names are often preceded by the word prestigious in the news media. But how scientific is the process by which biomedical journal editors decide what research articles to publish? Journal editors conceded at a three-day meeting earlier this month that their editorial procedures are imperfect, frequently fallible, and have received little serious scrutiny.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
If you've ever thought about writing a book, and wondered what a successful proposal looks like, wonder no longer. In a unique experiment, the publisher Palgrave Macmillan is posting proposals for nonfiction, academic titles, and inviting the public to comment on them. The publisher is also posting chapters from the proposed books -- all of which have been already accepted for publication. The books take on a wide range of topics in the social sciences and humanities, and include titles on “race and the Brazilian body,” horror cinema, and the German revolutionary Rosa Luxemburg.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
In a fight that could have wide-ranging implications, Los Angeles County supervisors are pushing to see confidential medical records used by county doctors to evaluate their peers to determine whether they have met accepted standards of care, saying they need the information to ensure patient safety and justify settling malpractice claims against the county. Access to such information emerged as an issue earlier this year after concerns were raised about peer review at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center . An anonymous letter to state regulators alleged that among other problems at the county hospital's neonatal intensive care unit, doctors and staff were not meeting to discuss medical mistakes and that peer review was "missing.
BUSINESS
November 29, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
The publishing house Elsevier no doubt hoped to put a major embarrassment behind itself Thursday by retracting one of the most controversial papers of recent times. Instead, it has created further contention over peer-review practices in the for-profit scientific publishing world. The paper , by French researcher Gilles-Eric Seralini and his colleagues, created an instant uproar when it appeared in Elsevier's journal Food and Chemical Toxicology last year. The paper's explosive finding was that laboratory rats fed for up to two years on genetically modified corn of a type widely used in the United States developed huge, grotesque tumors.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
With dual doctorates in chemistry and materials science and 23 years as a college instructor, Abdul Ismail looked like a dream candidate for a job teaching high school science. But despite his glowing resume, Ismail quickly ran into trouble. He had difficulty relating to 14-year-olds. His lectures were dry recitations delivered facing the chalkboard. When the students acted up, he kicked them out. In most schools, such a teacher would give up or muddle along in isolation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1986 | JOHN SPANO, Times Staff Writer
A lawsuit following a tonsillectomy that left a boy permanently brain damaged has threatened to undermine a system California doctors use to police the quality of medical care they provide in hospitals, according to the state medical association. The anesthesiologist in the 1979 tonsillectomy was suspended from practicing at Santa Ana-Tustin Community Hospital, now known as Western Medical Center, after a peer committee reviewed her performance during the operation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 2000
The membership of the Los Angeles teachers union has overwhelmingly ratified a plan to have senior teachers consult with colleagues who receive poor evaluations to help them improve or encourage them to leave the profession. In three days of balloting, 77% of the teachers agreed to add the new peer assistance and review program to their contract.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first skirmish in the war between neurosurgeon Mark Anderson and orthopedic surgeon Brian Ewald erupted one day in surgery at St. Joseph Hospital, where their unconscious patient lay on the operating table with a broken neck. Anderson says that as he tried to mend the damaged vertebrae with prosthetic wire, Ewald refused to continue and threatened to get Anderson kicked off the staff at St. Joseph, one of Orange County's premier medical facilities.
OPINION
August 29, 1999 | Karen Wright, Karen Wright, a science journalist, has written for Scientific American, Discover, Nature, Science and the New York Times Magazine. She is completing a novel about desert ecology and human procreation
It was a victimless crime, and it didn't make many headlines. Only someone who spends hours a day with her nose pressed against a computer screen would have noticed when, earlier this summer, a researcher formerly at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was found by federal watchdogs to have fabricated information on the health effects of electromagnetic fields.
BUSINESS
October 25, 1995 | LEE DYE
One of the great sacred cows of science, the "peer review" system that determines who gets published in professional journals and who gets funding for their work, is now facing a serious attack. The system, in which proposals for publication and funding must first be approved by others in the same field, has always been unpopular with some who feel their work is not getting the support it deserves.
BUSINESS
October 18, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Yelp, the popular review site known to make or break local businesses, will start publicly branding companies it suspects of buying fake evaluations. The San Francisco-based website, which already tries to filter out dubious appraisals, said it will now start posting visible consumer alerts on websites suspected of soliciting reviews-for-hire to boost ratings. The alerts will stay up for at least 90 days - longer if the suspicious activity continues, according to Yelp. Users, many of whom consider Yelp to be the last word on whether a business is worth visiting, can click on the alerts for more details.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 2012 | By Teresa Watanabe, Los Angeles Times
One by one, the three teenage girls took the stand and answered hard questions about their awful actions one night in April. Why would you deface your Jewish classmate's home with swastikas and the word "Jew"? When you defecated on her doorstep, what could you possibly have been thinking? But it was not a prosecutor posing the questions in the hearing in downtown Los Angeles last week, which involved criminal charges of vandalism, vandalism as a hate crime and terrorism by symbol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 2011 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Fresh questions about the ridership and revenue projections that underpin the state's $43-billion bullet train project have been raised in a new internal report by the agency charged with building the system. Among the key conclusions of a California High Speed Rail Authority panel of experts is that forecasts of up to 117 million annual riders by 2030 — which have helped support predictions that the system would generate billions in profits — need to be recalibrated to be more conservative and better reflect important factors that could affect ridership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 2010 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times
An auditing firm that has come under scrutiny for failing to uncover corruption in the city of Bell has hired an independent accounting company to review its practices as some government agencies review their ties with the firm. CalPERS, the state employee retirement fund, has decided not to give Mayer Hoffman McCann any more work until state Controller John Chiang completes a review of Bell's auditing. Officials in several Southern California cities said they too are waiting to see Chiang's report before deciding what to do. Mayer Hoffman conducts outside audits for numerous California government agencies as well as some federal agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 29, 2010 | Steve Lopez
Steve Franklin, a middle school teacher in L.A. Unified, had some issues with the Times series on teacher evaluations, so he fired off a letter to the editor. It read, in part: "When somebody can prove that high test scores produce good citizens, critical thinkers and productive members of society, then and only then can we say the teachers who taught those kids were 'good.' " Yeah, yeah, yeah, I thought. Test scores aren't always the best measure of students or teachers, but without them, how do we judge the performance of either?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
In a fight that could have wide-ranging implications, Los Angeles County supervisors are pushing to see confidential medical records used by county doctors to evaluate their peers to determine whether they have met accepted standards of care, saying they need the information to ensure patient safety and justify settling malpractice claims against the county. Access to such information emerged as an issue earlier this year after concerns were raised about peer review at Olive View-UCLA Medical Center . An anonymous letter to state regulators alleged that among other problems at the county hospital's neonatal intensive care unit, doctors and staff were not meeting to discuss medical mistakes and that peer review was "missing.
BUSINESS
November 8, 1995 | LEE DYE
Even in science, a flawed system that is the "best process we've got" can turn out to be the only game in town. Readers responding to my Oct. 25 column cite many problems with the peer review system that determines who gets published in professional journals and who gets funding for their work, but none recommended abolishing it.
NEWS
February 11, 1999 | AMY PYLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most controversial piece of Gov. Gray Davis' $444-million education plan--a proposal for teachers to evaluate their peers--received its first legislative approval Wednesday. But the bipartisan honeymoon that last week greeted Davis' proposal for increasing reading instruction was over. The Peer Assistance and Review bill passed the Assembly Education Committee on a partisan 12-2 vote Wednesday, with two Republicans voting no and the rest abstaining.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 18, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County supervisors on Tuesday ordered improvements intended to shore up patient safety at the county's hospitals and clinics after reviewing a study commissioned to look at malpractice payouts. The risk management study, conducted by the Abaris Group, a Walnut Creek-based independent consulting firm, found that payouts for malpractice cases settled between 2005 and 2007 increased from more than $8 million to more than $12 million. At the same time, a review of records found that the number of incidents that either resulted in or were expected to result in malpractice lawsuits dropped from 354 in 2002 to 107 last year.
HEALTH
February 25, 2010 | Colorado Public News Staff
• Providers collaborate to emphasize preventive care for all and the reduction of complications in cases of major chronic illnesses like diabetes and heart disease. • A non-profit hospice emphasizes comfort for the dying over futile chemotherapy and surgery, extending life an average of 10 days and saving $5,150 for every person who dies there. • The one dominant home health agency is non-profit, not owned by doctors ordering treatment that brings them profits.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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