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Peggy Noonan

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1988
Congratulations, America. You've finally elected a woman president, Peggy Noonan! It was her speech writing that made a kinder, gentler George Bush with a thousand points of light. The female Cyrano de Bergerac aside, Bush is now accountable to all the American citizens. How about 240 million points of light, George? JUNE FORAY DONAVAN Woodland Hills
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By James Rainey
If former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is to maintain his place at or near the top of Republican presidential polls, it will be no thanks to the assistance of America's conservative political commentators. Columnists and bloggers of the right have been torching Gingrich with unusual abandon in recent days — charging that the long-tenured politician can't be trusted to adhere to conservative ideals or to stay on message if he is unleashed in a prolonged general election campaign.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Although her ideological sinews cross with his, former Republican speech writer Peggy Noonan is good cop to House Speaker Newt Gingrich's bad cop, the soothing purr versus the scratchy hair shirt. Noonan, with her soft, disarming, chummy television manner, is the conservative version of using women and children to shield the troops. It's not fair, but it works. This is no trudging babushka, though.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 2001
Re "Bush Winds Up and Delivers," Commentary, Nov. 1: James Pinkerton devotes an entire column to telling us President Bush is solid because he's OK at throwing a baseball--is Pinkerton serious? Bush blew it weeks ago (see Mayor Rudy Giuliani) when he failed to show up for the Yankees' first home game after Sept. 11. Our leader needs to be out and about ridding this nation of its fear and malaise (see Giuliani). Where's George? Can anyone state a single memorable line from Bush in response to the greatest challenge to our nation in over 50 years?
OPINION
May 6, 1990 | Cokie Roberts, Cokie Roberts is the congressional correspondent for National Public Radio news and special correspondent for ABC news. The interview was conducted in Roberts' office at ABC's Washington bureau
Since the summer night in New Orleans when he accepted the Republican nomination for President, two terms have followed George Bush: "a thousand points of light" and "a kinder, gentler nation." They have provided fodder for cartoonists and columnists, served as inspiration to faithful followers, been used ironically by fierce foes. But they have not been forgotten. They are the product of Peggy Noonan's pen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK, Elaine Ciulla Kamarck is a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute in Washington. and
Millions of working-class Americans can still name the towns in Ireland, Italy or Poland that their parents came from. For them, the Democratic Party used to be a lot like the Catholic Church; they occasionally strayed from the one true faith but they always came home. But in the 1970s, these people began to leave the Democratic Party on a more regular basis, adding their votes to those of white Southerners who had defected to Barry Goldwater, George Wallace and Richard Nixon a decade before.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, in her role as speech writer, Peggy Noonan articulated the thoughts of Presidents. Those were her words Ronald Reagan spoke at Normandy--"These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs." After the space shuttle Challenger exploded live on TV, killing seven astronauts, that was her speech Reagan delivered, so aptly quoting a poem about those who "slipped the surly bonds of Earth" to "touch the face of God."
BOOKS
February 4, 1990 | David Klinghoffer, Klinghoffer, formerly assistant literary editor of National Review, now writes about popular culture for the Washington Times
Even among conservatives, Peggy Noonan, the celebrated Reagan speech writer, continues to draw mixed reactions. Was she a sinner or a savior? Opinions differ. When excerpts from this memoir appeared last October in the New York Times Magazine, the ensuing publicity earned the author an immediate censure in National Review--possibly Reagan's most loyal supporter in all of journalism.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994 | Peter Haldeman, Peter Haldeman is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
In case you'd filed the name away with Strategic Defense Initiative and floppy bow ties for women, Peggy Noonan is the one who morphed from news producer for Dan Rather to speech writer for Ronald Reagan and documented her reincarnation in the rosily titled "What I Saw at the Revolution." (Her political memoir earned Noonan tags like "poet laureate of resurgent Republicanism."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011 | By James Rainey
If former House Speaker Newt Gingrich is to maintain his place at or near the top of Republican presidential polls, it will be no thanks to the assistance of America's conservative political commentators. Columnists and bloggers of the right have been torching Gingrich with unusual abandon in recent days — charging that the long-tenured politician can't be trusted to adhere to conservative ideals or to stay on message if he is unleashed in a prolonged general election campaign.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Once, in her role as speech writer, Peggy Noonan articulated the thoughts of Presidents. Those were her words Ronald Reagan spoke at Normandy--"These are the boys of Pointe du Hoc. These are the men who took the cliffs." After the space shuttle Challenger exploded live on TV, killing seven astronauts, that was her speech Reagan delivered, so aptly quoting a poem about those who "slipped the surly bonds of Earth" to "touch the face of God."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Although her ideological sinews cross with his, former Republican speech writer Peggy Noonan is good cop to House Speaker Newt Gingrich's bad cop, the soothing purr versus the scratchy hair shirt. Noonan, with her soft, disarming, chummy television manner, is the conservative version of using women and children to shield the troops. It's not fair, but it works. This is no trudging babushka, though.
BOOKS
July 3, 1994 | Peter Haldeman, Peter Haldeman is a Los Angeles-based free-lance writer
In case you'd filed the name away with Strategic Defense Initiative and floppy bow ties for women, Peggy Noonan is the one who morphed from news producer for Dan Rather to speech writer for Ronald Reagan and documented her reincarnation in the rosily titled "What I Saw at the Revolution." (Her political memoir earned Noonan tags like "poet laureate of resurgent Republicanism."
BOOKS
July 28, 1991
Peggy Noonan's purported review was hardly that at all. It was, indeed, an archconservative polemic set out to rewrite history. She quotes Joe McCarthy, who she agrees was "vulgar and demagogic," for the purpose of attributing "common sense" to his campaign of fear and intimidation. Does she think that events have no context, that words may be cut and pasted irrespective of their initial intent? Perhaps she wishes that the public had a memory as faulty as one of her former employers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1990
Well golly gee, goody gum drops, I'm glad to see that an interview with Peggy, excuse me, Noonan rates up there with the global issues ("Peggy Noonan, the Woman Who Gave Presidents the Word," Opinion, May 6). Old Peggy is really a point of light! I liked her comments on feminism and how she's real hip, and at the same time aware that she did fill a slot as a "woman speech writer." She even admitted that she "tends toward" males with "authoritative personas." What a surprise!
OPINION
May 6, 1990 | Cokie Roberts, Cokie Roberts is the congressional correspondent for National Public Radio news and special correspondent for ABC news. The interview was conducted in Roberts' office at ABC's Washington bureau
Since the summer night in New Orleans when he accepted the Republican nomination for President, two terms have followed George Bush: "a thousand points of light" and "a kinder, gentler nation." They have provided fodder for cartoonists and columnists, served as inspiration to faithful followers, been used ironically by fierce foes. But they have not been forgotten. They are the product of Peggy Noonan's pen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1988
I wonder if anyone besides myself finds it disgusting and deplorable that Presidents and presidential candidates have their speeches written by other people? If a candidate for the highest office in the land isn't capable of writing his own speech, why on earth are we putting him (or her) in office? Are they expressing their views, their thoughts, their decisions, their ideas, or Peggy Noonan's or Kenneth Khachigian's? No one wrote Lincoln's speeches and he managed. Let's see if any of these ghostwriters can top the Gettysburg Address.
BOOKS
July 28, 1991
Peggy Noonan's purported review was hardly that at all. It was, indeed, an archconservative polemic set out to rewrite history. She quotes Joe McCarthy, who she agrees was "vulgar and demagogic," for the purpose of attributing "common sense" to his campaign of fear and intimidation. Does she think that events have no context, that words may be cut and pasted irrespective of their initial intent? Perhaps she wishes that the public had a memory as faulty as one of her former employers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 1990 | ELAINE CIULLA KAMARCK, Elaine Ciulla Kamarck is a senior fellow at the Progressive Policy Institute in Washington. and
Millions of working-class Americans can still name the towns in Ireland, Italy or Poland that their parents came from. For them, the Democratic Party used to be a lot like the Catholic Church; they occasionally strayed from the one true faith but they always came home. But in the 1970s, these people began to leave the Democratic Party on a more regular basis, adding their votes to those of white Southerners who had defected to Barry Goldwater, George Wallace and Richard Nixon a decade before.
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