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Peggy Say

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NEWS
April 19, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
When Peggy Say met with Lt. Col. Oliver L. North in the White House last October, she begged for action to free her brother, Terry A. Anderson, who had then been held hostage in Lebanon for a year and a half. She left the meeting, which occurred just before Anderson's birthday, in tears after telling North: "I once thought Terry might not have to celebrate his 39th birthday in captivity. Now he'll be damn lucky if he doesn't turn 40 in there."
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NEWS
December 17, 1992 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A member of a citizens group campaigning to recall all five City Council members has been threatened with prosecution for placing a large sign proclaiming "Recall the City Council" on the back of her house, which overlooks Covina's Metrolink station. Peggy Ortiz said she received a letter on Dec. 7 from the city Planning Department notifying her that there had been complaints about the sign.
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NEWS
February 19, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The sister of American hostage Terry A. Anderson praised PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat after he told her he was doing his "very best" to win the release of 18 Western hostages in Lebanon. Peggy Say said she was encouraged after her hourlong meeting with the Palestine Liberation Organization leader but said, "Unfortunately, he has no direct influence on the kidnapers." Anderson, a wire service correspondent, is believed to be held by Shiite Muslims with ties to Iran.
BOOKS
February 24, 1991 | Bob Sipchen, Sipchen is a Times staff writer currently working on a book on gangs and law enforcement for Doubleday
On March 16, 1985, three men with automatic weapons dragged Terry Anderson into a green Mercedes and drove off into the chaos of Beirut. Anderson was chief correspondent for the Associated Press in Lebanon. Six years later, he remains America's longest-held hostage. From the moment Peggy Say received the 4 a.m. call informing her of her brother's kidnaping, his release became her obsession.
BOOKS
February 24, 1991 | Bob Sipchen, Sipchen is a Times staff writer currently working on a book on gangs and law enforcement for Doubleday
On March 16, 1985, three men with automatic weapons dragged Terry Anderson into a green Mercedes and drove off into the chaos of Beirut. Anderson was chief correspondent for the Associated Press in Lebanon. Six years later, he remains America's longest-held hostage. From the moment Peggy Say received the 4 a.m. call informing her of her brother's kidnaping, his release became her obsession.
NEWS
December 17, 1992 | RICHARD WINTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A member of a citizens group campaigning to recall all five City Council members has been threatened with prosecution for placing a large sign proclaiming "Recall the City Council" on the back of her house, which overlooks Covina's Metrolink station. Peggy Ortiz said she received a letter on Dec. 7 from the city Planning Department notifying her that there had been complaints about the sign.
BOOKS
April 28, 1991
I plan to read "Forgotten" by Peggy Say (Feb. 24) if only for the pleasure of seeing Rep. Robert Dornan called an idiot in print. EVELYN C. WEBER, LOS ALAMITOS
NEWS
February 28, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The sister of the longest-held Western hostage in Lebanon said today as she ended a pilgrimage to Europe and the Middle East that she believes the atmosphere is right for the release of all 18 captives. "I think that this is the beginning of the end," said Peggy Say, sister of Terry Anderson, 42, chief Middle East correspondent of the Associated Press.
NEWS
July 21, 1986 | Associated Press
The sister of kidnaped American journalist Terry Anderson met today with a Syrian Foreign Ministry official to discuss the ordeal of her brother and four other American captives in Lebanon. Issam Hayyani, head of the U.S. department in the Foreign Ministry, was the first Syrian official to receive Peggy Say, 45, since she arrived in Damascus on Sunday seeking help in freeing Anderson, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, and the other hostages.
NEWS
December 11, 1987
Terry A. Anderson's family and friends marked his 1,000th day as a captive in Lebanon in a ceremony on Capitol Hill in Washington that combined prayers and pleas for his release. "I know that Terry must know we are all out there, caring, working for his freedom," said his sister, Peggy Say. Anderson, 40, chief Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press, was kidnaped March 16, 1985.
NEWS
February 19, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
The sister of American hostage Terry A. Anderson praised PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat after he told her he was doing his "very best" to win the release of 18 Western hostages in Lebanon. Peggy Say said she was encouraged after her hourlong meeting with the Palestine Liberation Organization leader but said, "Unfortunately, he has no direct influence on the kidnapers." Anderson, a wire service correspondent, is believed to be held by Shiite Muslims with ties to Iran.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
When Peggy Say met with Lt. Col. Oliver L. North in the White House last October, she begged for action to free her brother, Terry A. Anderson, who had then been held hostage in Lebanon for a year and a half. She left the meeting, which occurred just before Anderson's birthday, in tears after telling North: "I once thought Terry might not have to celebrate his 39th birthday in captivity. Now he'll be damn lucky if he doesn't turn 40 in there."
NEWS
May 9, 1990 | Associated Press
Terry A. Anderson, the longest held of the Western hostages in Lebanon, helped fellow prisoners make Scrabble and Monopoly games to amuse themselves, former captive Frank H. Reed told Anderson's sister, Peggy Say. Although Anderson, 42, is in good physical condition from plenty of exercise, he is tired and needs dental care, Say said Reed told her Sunday. She said Reed thinks he last saw Anderson between a year and 18 months ago. "He is still a vindictive hearts player," she said.
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