YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPendant


November 16, 2003
"Like a big jigsaw puzzle, the 30-foot, 2,000-pound chandelier was put back together and rehung in the rotunda." The heck with faceless bureaucracy. This town's municipal seat is a 1920s Mission-meets-Deco palace at Temple and Main streets. "City Hall: The Heart of Los Angeles," an illustrated children's paperback from Beverly Hills-based Tallfellow Press, hails the restoration of the building, largely completed in 2001.
December 23, 2007 | Camilo Smith, Times Staff Writer
He made a $450,000 pendant as big as your forearm, shaped like the state of California, and a piece of baby bling for Suri Cruise. Across town, the competition crafted an 18-carat, black-and-white diamond pendant to look like Missy Elliott's face for the rapper to wear in a video, and a 40-carat blue diamond and ruby Papa Smurf pendant for basketballer DeShawn Stevenson. Jacob the Jeweler and Chris Aire? No. We're talking Jason of Beverly Hills and Icee Fresh -- the new purveyors of bling.
December 7, 2009 | By Jill Leovy
The prayer in Spanish sounded like one from an ordinary Catholic Mass. But the man who led it wore a coyote-skin headdress and called himself the last of 13 generations of brujos -- witch doctors -- in his family. FOR THE RECORD: Santa Muerte: An article in Monday's Section A about followers of the sect of Santa Muerte misspelled the last name of Rick Nahmias, a photographer who has documented the movement, as Nahmais. — The name the worshipers invoked was not that of the Virgin Mary but of Santa Muerte, or "Holy Death," a Mexican folk saint linked to narcotics trafficking, a kind of female grim reaper with a skull for a face.
October 29, 2012 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Guatemalan archaeologists have found the tomb of what may have been one of the Maya's earliest rulers and perhaps its most influential. King K'utz Chman introduced many cultural features that eventually defined the Maya, including building pyramids instead of square structures and commissioning the production of carved sculptures that depicted the royal family. His grave is the most ancient royal Maya burial to be found and it contains a variety of carved jade objects indicating his wealth and status.
February 27, 2004 | From Associated Press
Mel Gibson's "The Passion of the Christ" not only has people debating the last hours of Jesus' life but also running out to buy such souvenirs as crucifixes, lapel pins and cards tied to the film's promotion. A particularly popular item is a pendant fashioned from a single nail made of pewter and attached to a leather strap, say officials of Bob Siemon Designs, licensed by Gibson's Icon Productions to produce jewelry tied to the film.
May 14, 1998 | CHRIS CHI
Two Oxnard men were in jail on suspicion of committing a robbery in La Colonia early Wednesday, authorities said. The arrests occurred after an unidentified person came to the Oxnard Police Station about 2 a.m. and reported being robbed near the corner of Cooper Road and Grant Avenue, police said. Twenty minutes later, police pulled over a red 1993 Ford Escort in an alley off Grant Avenue and arrested the two men.
August 17, 2006 | David A. Keeps
SET up like an exhibition space but operating as a store, Denizen Design Gallery opened last week in Los Angeles. Conceived as a West Coast showcase for limited edition domestic furnishings, Denizen mixes fine art and functionality in wood, concrete, steel and plastic. The discoveries include Johnston-Ready's sleek stools made of folded sheet aluminum and benches in solid walnut (shown above with a cast aluminum table topped in glass).
September 28, 2003 | Barbara Thornburg, Barbara Thornburg is senior home design editor for the magazine.
It doesn't matter if you're a serious collector like Eli Broad or Peter Norton or a casual fan of Bauer redware vases and Japanese woodblock prints when it comes to cohabiting with art. Everyone faces the same issues: Where should these cherished objects be displayed? How does one light them appropriately? What steps can be taken to safeguard them against the ravages of time and nature? The answers, like the art itself, will differ from person to person and from collection to collection.
Los Angeles Times Articles