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Penicillin

OPINION
May 5, 2006 | Lester Grinspoon, LESTER GRINSPOON is an emeritus professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and the author of "Marijuana, the Forbidden Medicine" (Yale University Press, 1997).
THE FOOD AND Drug Administration is contradicting itself. It recently reiterated its position that cannabis has no medical utility, but it also approved advanced clinical trials for a marijuana-derived drug called Sativex, a liquid preparation of two of the most therapeutically useful compounds of cannabis. This is the same agency that in 1985 approved Marinol, another oral cannabis-derived medicine. Both Sativex and Marinol represent the "pharmaceuticalization" of marijuana.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1988
Los Angeles County health officials blame an outbreak of penicillin-resistant gonorrhea on an increase in unsafe sexual practices, prostitution and drug abuse. Through October, the county had 1,193 reported cases of penicillin-resistant gonorrhea, 57 fewer cases than at the same time last year but more than half of them showing up from July through September. In October alone, the county reported 271 cases. This clustering of cases signals a sudden outbreak, health official said.
NEWS
July 12, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, HealthKey / For the Booster Shots blog
A new strain of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea should be enough to scare anyone who's playing the field without full protection. But the worries might not stop there. Like gonorrhea, chlamydia and syphilis are sexually transmitted diseases that are caused by bacteria. And anytime you have a bacterial disease, there's at least some chance that the germs could eventually find a way to outsmart antibiotics. So what are the odds that chlamydia or syphilis could turn into the next super germs?
WORLD
June 14, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
The instructions aren't on any box of medicine, but Mexicans know them all the same: At the first sign of sore throat or fever, race to the pharmacy for antibiotics. Take as you see fit. Even though the law requires a prescription for antibiotics, pharmacists in Mexico seldom ask for one before handing them over. And they hand them over by the boatload: nearly 2 billion doses of antibiotics a year, enough for two full courses of treatment for almost each of the nation's 110 million people.
HEALTH
January 9, 2012 | By Jill U. Adams, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Only 20% of the antibiotics sold in the U.S. are given to people who are sick with bacterial infections, such as ear and urinary tract infections and pneumonia. Most of the penicillin, tetracycline and other antibiotic drugs used in this country are given to livestock that are perfectly healthy. Farmers have been putting these medicines in animal feed since the 1950s. They say the drugs help protect herds from infectious diseases and help animals grow faster. But for at least 40 years, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has been concerned that the widespread practice may be fueling the growth of human pathogens that are no longer vulnerable to doctors' front-line drugs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1990
About 70 medical vials that have washed ashore on San Diego County beaches in the past two days may contain penicillin, health officials said Monday. "The white or yellowish-white powder looked outdated," said Gary Stephany, environmental health director for the county Department of Health Services. "It looked like the type of medicine someone just tossed in the ocean, although I hope no one tossed it there. It appears to be the same substance that washed up on beaches two years ago.
NEWS
August 7, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Andrew Phillip Cunanan was nursing a stomach wound before his suicide and investigators believe he may have been wounded in one of the five murders he's suspected of committing. Police found bloody bandages, cotton swabs, gauze pads and penicillin pills in the Miami Beach houseboat where Cunanan ended his life with a gunshot to the head July 23. Cunanan, 27, was the prime suspect in the point-blank slaying of fashion designer Gianni Versace July 15 in Miami Beach, along with four other
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | From Reuters
Teen-agers are having more sex despite government warnings of the danger of getting the deadly AIDS virus, U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop said today. "We do know that teen-agers are not listening," Koop said on ABC's "Good Morning America." He said that infectious syphilis and penicillin-resistant gonorrhea spread faster in 1987 than at any other time in 16 years and that 3 of every 1,000 college students tested positive for AIDS, according to a study this year.
NEWS
March 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Led by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, 37 health and consumer groups petitioned the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to ban the use of seven antibiotics in livestock, saying the practice poses a potential threat to human health. The drugs the groups want banned are penicillin, tetracycline, erythromycin, tylosin, lincomycin, virginiamycin and bacitracin.
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