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Penile Implants

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury awarded a Chatsworth bank executive $300,000 in damages Monday from the manufacturer of a penile inflation device that failed, causing him permanent sexual problems, the man's lawyer said. William Neuser, 49, won the judgment in Van Nuys Superior Court against American Medical Systems, a Minnesota firm that is the largest U. S. maker of penile implants. Neuser sued the firm in 1989 after a tube in his implant fell out, rendering it useless, said Robert M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisements beckoned with promises like "No man ever needs to feel inadequate again" and "Dreams do come true." And they found an audience. Several thousand men, willing to pay upward of $5,900 to have their penises enlarged, answered the ads. They were men such as "Lee," who thought the surgery would improve his sex life. Or "John," who wanted to look good in the locker room after workouts. What they got was something else again.
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BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pfizer Penile Implant Suit Expected: A class-action lawsuit was expected to be filed in federal court in San Francisco on Friday against a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc., alleging that penile implants it markets are defective and dangerous, two law firms said. The suit will seek unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against American Medical Systems Inc., the largest U.S. manufacturer of silicone penile implants, the San Francisco law firms said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
A Culver City physician who has performed 5,000 penile enlargement surgeries--and triggered scores of malpractice suits--had his medical license suspended Friday by a state administrative law judge who said he was guilty of gross negligence and incompetence. The ruling went against Dr. Melvyn Rosenstein, who in advertising calls himself the world's leading authority on penis enlargement surgery.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | SHARI ROAN
Inflatable penile implants are popular because they produce the most natural erection. But they are also the most mechanically complicated and are subject to problems. With one popular device, the surgeon implants a fluid-filled reservoir in a man's lower abdomen. The reservoir is connected to a pump inserted in the scrotum and tubes in the penis. To obtain an erection, the scrotum is squeezed and fluid moves from the reservoir to the penis. Squeezing the pump again reverses the flow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The advertisements beckoned with promises like "No man ever needs to feel inadequate again" and "Dreams do come true." And they found an audience. Several thousand men, willing to pay upward of $5,900 to have their penises enlarged, answered the ads. They were men such as "Lee," who thought the surgery would improve his sex life. Or "John," who wanted to look good in the locker room after workouts. What they got was something else again.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Melvyn Rosenstein, perhaps the nation's busiest practitioner of controversial penis enlargement operations, has been temporarily forced by the Medical Board of California to stop advertising or performing the risky surgeries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996
A Culver City physician who has performed 5,000 penile enlargement surgeries--and triggered scores of malpractice suits--had his medical license suspended Friday by a state administrative law judge who said he was guilty of gross negligence and incompetence. The ruling went against Dr. Melvyn Rosenstein, who in advertising calls himself the world's leading authority on penis enlargement surgery.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
For two decades, men with impotence have had the option of receiving penile implants if other treatments, such as medications or counseling, failed. The devices became greatly popular, and an estimated 28,000 men receive implants each year. Now, however, concerns are growing over the safety of the devices, which for thousands of men provide the only means for normal sexual functioning. The U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1991
I am outraged by the article. As a facilitator and member of a breast cancer support group, it is obvious that Rosen has never attended any breast cancer support group. Most of us know the value and importance of implants to put our lives back together after experiencing cancer. Rosen, as with the majority of the media, seems to think of breast implants as vanity when it is really sanity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1996 | DOUGLAS P. SHUIT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dr. Melvyn Rosenstein, perhaps the nation's busiest practitioner of controversial penis enlargement operations, has been temporarily forced by the Medical Board of California to stop advertising or performing the risky surgeries.
BUSINESS
May 21, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pfizer Penile Implant Suit Expected: A class-action lawsuit was expected to be filed in federal court in San Francisco on Friday against a subsidiary of Pfizer Inc., alleging that penile implants it markets are defective and dangerous, two law firms said. The suit will seek unspecified compensatory and punitive damages against American Medical Systems Inc., the largest U.S. manufacturer of silicone penile implants, the San Francisco law firms said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury awarded a Chatsworth bank executive $300,000 in damages Monday from the manufacturer of a penile inflation device that failed, causing him permanent sexual problems, the man's lawyer said. William Neuser, 49, won the judgment in Van Nuys Superior Court against American Medical Systems, a Minnesota firm that is the largest U. S. maker of penile implants. Neuser sued the firm in 1989 after a tube in his implant fell out, rendering it useless, said Robert M.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | SHARI ROAN
Inflatable penile implants are popular because they produce the most natural erection. But they are also the most mechanically complicated and are subject to problems. With one popular device, the surgeon implants a fluid-filled reservoir in a man's lower abdomen. The reservoir is connected to a pump inserted in the scrotum and tubes in the penis. To obtain an erection, the scrotum is squeezed and fluid moves from the reservoir to the penis. Squeezing the pump again reverses the flow.
NEWS
October 26, 1993 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
For two decades, men with impotence have had the option of receiving penile implants if other treatments, such as medications or counseling, failed. The devices became greatly popular, and an estimated 28,000 men receive implants each year. Now, however, concerns are growing over the safety of the devices, which for thousands of men provide the only means for normal sexual functioning. The U.S.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
Men will soon be able to buy the first government-sanctioned drug to relieve sexual impotence. The Food and Drug Administration approved Caverject on Thursday, and manufacturer Upjohn Co. said the drug will be in pharmacies by September. It is available by prescription only; a price has not been set. When injected into the penis, the drug can induce an erection within five to 20 minutes in up to 80% of cases, the FDA said.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | JERRY GILLAM, Times staff writer
A bill to encourage automobile manufacturers to produce cheaper and "cleaner" gas-saving cars has cleared its first Senate committee hurdle. The measure would provide a marketing incentive for producing these vehicles, basing the amount of state sales tax applied to new car purchases on how much pollution the vehicles spew into the air. Sponsor Sen. Gary K. Hart (D-Santa Barbara) estimated that a new-car buyer could save as much as $700 on a fuel-efficient, low-polluting, medium-priced vehicle.
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