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ENTERTAINMENT
September 23, 2009 | Gary Goldstein
In 1971, Daniel Ellsberg, a former Marine, Pentagon employee and military analyst, performed one of the most daring whistle-blowing acts of the century: Leaking ex-employer Rand Corp.'s copies of the top-secret Pentagon Papers to the New York Times (and subsequently other major dailies) in order to expose the truth -- or, more specifically, the lies -- behind America's longtime involvement in the Vietnam conflict. The gripping story of how hawk-turned-dove Ellsberg's explosive actions circuitously led to the impeachment of Richard Nixon and, in turn, an end to the Vietnam War is comprehensively detailed in Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith's evocative documentary "The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers."
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OPINION
November 10, 2013 | By Steve Oney
His was the last face I saw, the final voice I heard before I stepped backward off the 100-foot cliff. Even now, nearly two decades later, I can envision his weathered features and wispy white hair, and I can recall much of what he said. My fear, he told me, was not only natural but essential both to my survival and to that of the species. Human beings were not meant to jump from high places. He then hastened to add that I should have no doubts about doing exactly that. My ropes and braking bar were in order, as was my climbing harness.
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OPINION
June 11, 2006 | Daniel Ellsberg, Daniel Ellsberg was put on trial in 1973 for leaking the Pentagon Papers, but the case was dismissed after four months because of government misconduct.
A JOINT resolution referred to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee last week by Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.) calls for the withdrawal of all American military forces from Iraq by Dec. 31. Boxer's "redeployment" bill cites in its preamble a January poll finding that 64% of Iraqis believe that crime and violent attacks will decrease if the U.S. leaves Iraq within six months, 67% believe that their day-to-day security will increase if the U.S.
OPINION
June 12, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Where there's smoke arising from a free-speech matter, you're likely to find the fiery attorney Floyd Abrams. He's blazed a trail for freedom of the press from the Pentagon Papers case to protecting reporters' sources. He's just as incendiary when he's fighting forced warning labels on cigarettes and championing the Citizens United court decision. Abrams' memoir, " Friend of the Court ," arrives as news media and government are again at loggerheads over reporters' phone records and revelations-by-leak of widespread domestic surveillance - all burning issues for him. What do you think about the NSA leaks?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Daniel Ellsberg remembers the day he learned that time may indeed heal all wounds. "By the end of the Cold War, around 1989 or so," recalls Ellsberg, who had been despised and disowned in the '70s for leaking classified documents about the Vietnam War, "I'd be in a meeting with someone, and they wouldn't leave the room. " This small triumph ? he offers a shy smile ? may not sound like cause for celebration. But when you've been called "the most dangerous man in America" by Henry Kissinger, you take your good news where you can get it. Ellsberg's growing unease about the Vietnam War, his decision to leak the 7,000-page Pentagon Papers to the press and members of Congress, and the turmoil he experienced afterward are the subjects of POV's "The Most Dangerous Man in America," an Academy Award-nominated documentary that PBS broadcasts Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Leonard Weinglass, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago 7 and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday in New York City. He was 77. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said Michael Krinsky, a colleague and friend of 40 years. Weinglass, who practiced in Los Angeles for two decades before moving to New York, developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago 7 conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War protesters at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2008 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Anthony J. Russo, a Rand researcher in the late 1960s who encouraged Daniel Ellsberg to leak the Pentagon Papers and stood trial with him in the Vietnam War-era case that triggered debates over freedom of the press and hastened the fall of a president, has died. He was 71. Russo, who lived in Santa Monica for many years, died Wednesday of natural causes in his native Suffolk, Va., according to a spokesman for the Suffolk Police Department.
NEWS
February 10, 1992
Harding Foster Bancroft, 81, retired diplomat, lawyer and vice chairman of the New York Times who played a key role in the paper's decision to print the Pentagon Papers. A Navy lieutenant in World War II, Bancroft in 1945 joined the Bureau of United Nations Affairs in the State Department. In 1951, he became deputy U.S. representative to a U.N. panel on peace. He joined the Times in 1956 as assistant secretary and associate counsel.
BUSINESS
January 12, 1990 | Associated Press
A former Boeing Co. marketing executive was sentenced today to two years in prison for illegally passing classified Pentagon budget documents to his employers and other defense firms. Richard Lee Fowler, 64, was sentenced after his conviction last month on 39 felony counts arising from his possession of the Pentagon documents. Fowler could have received a 310-year prison term and a $225,000 fine. U.S. District Judge Albert V.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 13, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
William R. Glendon, 89, who successfully defended the Washington Post before the U.S. Supreme Court in the Pentagon Papers case, died of multiple organ failure Dec. 25 at a hospital in White Plains, N.Y. On June 26, 1971, Glendon, representing the Washington Post, and Alexander Bickel, representing the New York Times, argued before the high court against an effort by the Nixon White House to prevent publication of a secret multi-volume history of...
OPINION
June 12, 2013
Re "Hero or criminal?," Editorial, June 11, and "Analyst admits to cyber-spying leaks," June 10 Senate Intelligence Committee head Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) has called Edward J. Snowden's admitted leaking of the National Security Agency's extensive surveillance of Americans an act of treason. That is totally wrong. Snowden is a patriot of the highest order; he did not commit an act of treason. Feinstein is the one guilty of treason for allowing all the spying and not blowing the whistle herself when she had knowledge of this activity.
NEWS
June 11, 2013 | By Paul Thornton
Edward J. Snowden is "a low-level disenchanted punk," says LA Observed's Marc Lacter. In the New York Times, David Brooks notes that Snowden wasn't very neighborly or much of a loving son to his mother. A front-page story Tuesday in the L.A. Times begins : "He was a high school dropout, sometime junior college student and failed Army recruit. " It's safe to say the focus of the debate over the National Security Agency's massive electronic surveillance programs has shifted to the man who unmasked himself as the leaker.  This discussion will continue on Wednesday's letters page, and most of the readers who have written so far take a more positive view of Snowden than the observations above.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Since 2002, filmmaker-activist Robert Greenwald has made a string of vital feature documentaries, including the trenchant exposés "Uncovered: The War on Iraq" and "Outfoxed: Rupert Murdoch's War on Journalism. " His latest, the brief "War on Whistleblowers: Free Press and the National Security State," although vigorously assembled, proves to have less impact. Here, producer-director Greenwald takes on a big topic, zips through some history (Galileo and Copernicus were early whistle-blowers, Frank Serpico and Karen Silkwood more modern examples)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, the fourth publisher of the New York Times, who made history with his decision to publish the Pentagon Papers and revived the "Good Gray Lady" of print journalism with a radical redesign that set a new standard, has died. He was 86. His death Saturday at his home in Southampton, N.Y., after a long illness, was announced by his son and the current publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. Widely known by the nickname Punch, the senior Sulzberger was publisher of the Times from 1963 to 1992 and chairman and chief executive of the parent company from 1973 to 1997.
BUSINESS
June 11, 2012 | Ryan Faughnder
Apple Inc. co-founder Steve Jobs discussed unflattering details of his personal life when applying for top secret security clearance in the late 1980s. Steve Jobs told government officials in a 1988 interview that he thought someone might kidnap his illegitimate daughter in order to blackmail him, according to Department of Defense documents acquired by Wired through a Freedom of Information Act request. He also discussed his drug use, which has been disclosed in news stories and the extensive biography by Walter Isaacson that was published shortly after Jobs' death in 2011.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Leonard Weinglass, a crusading lawyer who championed radical and liberal causes and clients in some of the most controversial trials of the 1960s and '70s, including the Chicago 7 and Pentagon Papers cases, died Wednesday in New York City. He was 77. The cause was pancreatic cancer, said Michael Krinsky, a colleague and friend of 40 years. Weinglass, who practiced in Los Angeles for two decades before moving to New York, developed a reputation as a firebrand during the Chicago 7 conspiracy case against anti-Vietnam War protesters at the 1968 Democratic National Convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chalmers M. Roberts, 94, a retired chief diplomatic correspondent for the Washington Post, died Friday of congestive heart failure at his home in Bethesda, Md. Roberts spent more than two decades with the Post, becoming chief diplomatic correspondent in 1953. He also wrote about the Supreme Court, Congress and several occupants of the White House. Just before his retirement in 1971, Roberts threatened to resign if the Post did not publish his story on the Pentagon Papers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years after he released confidential government documents detailing the secret history of the Vietnam War, Daniel Ellsberg was still at it Thursday, calling for the release of a new generation of "Pentagon Papers" on the Persian Gulf War.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 5, 2010 | By Scott Timberg, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Daniel Ellsberg remembers the day he learned that time may indeed heal all wounds. "By the end of the Cold War, around 1989 or so," recalls Ellsberg, who had been despised and disowned in the '70s for leaking classified documents about the Vietnam War, "I'd be in a meeting with someone, and they wouldn't leave the room. " This small triumph ? he offers a shy smile ? may not sound like cause for celebration. But when you've been called "the most dangerous man in America" by Henry Kissinger, you take your good news where you can get it. Ellsberg's growing unease about the Vietnam War, his decision to leak the 7,000-page Pentagon Papers to the press and members of Congress, and the turmoil he experienced afterward are the subjects of POV's "The Most Dangerous Man in America," an Academy Award-nominated documentary that PBS broadcasts Tuesday.
OPINION
July 29, 2010
WikiLeaks and us Re "A whistle-blower with global resonance," and "WikiLeaks wasn't wrong," Editorial, July 27 WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, an Australian hacker, may end up being one of the best things to ever happen to our American democracy. It is not for politicians and bureaucrats to decide what American citizens and voters need to know. In the last 75 years, we have seen a sharp increase in the use of secrecy laws to cover up illegal activities, corruption and incompetence rather than to protect information that safeguards national security, as originally intended.
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