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Pentagon Papers

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991 | SCOTT HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twenty years after he released confidential government documents detailing the secret history of the Vietnam War, Daniel Ellsberg was still at it Thursday, calling for the release of a new generation of "Pentagon Papers" on the Persian Gulf War.
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OPINION
June 12, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Where there's smoke arising from a free-speech matter, you're likely to find the fiery attorney Floyd Abrams. He's blazed a trail for freedom of the press from the Pentagon Papers case to protecting reporters' sources. He's just as incendiary when he's fighting forced warning labels on cigarettes and championing the Citizens United court decision. Abrams' memoir, " Friend of the Court ," arrives as news media and government are again at loggerheads over reporters' phone records and revelations-by-leak of widespread domestic surveillance - all burning issues for him. What do you think about the NSA leaks?
NEWS
February 26, 1999 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Angry over disclosure of the Pentagon Papers for heightening opposition to the Vietnam War, President Nixon vowed to embarrass the Kennedy family and get even with liberals by declassifying secret documents relating to foreign affairs fiascos of the 1960s, according to new Watergate-era tape-recordings released Thursday. "There's something we can really hang Teddy [Sen. Edward M.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 1991 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For eight frustrating years, Leroy Aarons and Geoffrey Cowan had tried to get a theater company to mount a production of their docudrama, "Top Secret: The Battle for the Pentagon Papers." Several small troupes had expressed interest in the play, which re-enacts the 1971 clashes inside the Washington Post and the courts over the publication of the "top secret" Vietnam War documents. But none chose to produce it. Then, the Persian Gulf War hit.
BOOKS
October 13, 2002 | George C. Herring, George C. Herring is the author of "America's Longest War: The United States and Vietnam, 1950-1975."
The publication of Daniel Ellsberg's memoir, "Secrets," at this particular moment is undoubtedly coincidental, but there is an eerie timeliness about it. Rumors of war abound, this time perhaps for a unilateral preemptive full-scale attack unprecedented in American history. Decisions are being made on the basis of secret information that will be divulged, in Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld's words, "only if and when the president decides that he thinks it's appropriate."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2010 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Runaways Sony, $27.96; Blu-ray, $34.95 First time writer-director Floria Sigismondi turns the sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll lifestyle of the all-girl teen-rock act the Runaways into an impressionistic, wildly erratic art film, more about '70s decadence than biopic coherence. Any scene where the gals storm the stage and rock out is thrilling, and Michael Shannon gives another in his recent string of knockout performances as the band's guru-manager-leech, Kim Fowley. But the movie provides scant details about the band's brief rise to fame, and it shortchanges any character who's not Cherie Currie or Joan Jett.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1991 | KATIA HETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Vietnam War-era whistle-blower accused the U.S. government of committing war crimes in the Middle East during an anti-war rally Thursday at Saddleback College. Anthony J. Russo, who was involved in the release of the top-secret Pentagon Papers during the Vietnam War, said the government has violated international law, the United Nations charter and the U.S. Constitution by sending troops into combat against Iraq. "We should be supporting democratic reform in the Middle East, and we're not.
NEWS
July 18, 2001 | RICHARD T. COOPER and JACK NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For more than 20 years, Katharine Graham, head of the Washington Post and grande dame of American journalism, proudly displayed in her office the mechanical wringer from an old washing machine. It was a reminder that life entails risks--and that taking those risks can lead to greatness. During the early days of Watergate, when the Post labored almost alone to expose the improper and illegal actions that eventually forced President Richard M.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2012 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, the fourth publisher of the New York Times, who made history with his decision to publish the Pentagon Papers and revived the "Good Gray Lady" of print journalism with a radical redesign that set a new standard, has died. He was 86. His death Saturday at his home in Southampton, N.Y., after a long illness, was announced by his son and the current publisher, Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr. Widely known by the nickname Punch, the senior Sulzberger was publisher of the Times from 1963 to 1992 and chairman and chief executive of the parent company from 1973 to 1997.
BOOKS
September 9, 2001 | ROBERT SCHEER, Robert Scheer, whose nationally-syndicated column appears weekly in The Times, is a contributing editor to The Nation. He is working on a book about the Wen Ho Lee case
This could have been an important book. Daniel Ellsberg performed an uncommonly heroic act when, in 1971, he released the Pentagon Papers--the government's secret history of the Vietnam War--to an American public that was even then sacrificing its young as well as a significant portion of the population of Vietnam. The Pentagon Papers, an internal Pentagon study commissioned by then-Secretary of Defense Robert S.
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