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Pepper Spray

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 30, 2012 | Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Last month, pepper spray was in the news again. On April 3, about 30 people protesting a proposed two-tier tuition system at Santa Monica College were pepper-sprayed, sending two people to the hospital. The incident came five months after a campus police officer at UC Davis used pepper spray to break up an Occupy protest. A task force investigating the UC Davis case released a report on April 11 that assigned blame to all levels of the administration, prompting the school's police chief to resign.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2014 | Paige St. John
A federal judge Thursday called California's use of large amounts of pepper spray on mentally ill prisoners a "horrific violation" of their constitutional rights and ordered restrictions on the use of the chemical agent. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton's order requires California to continue revising disciplinary actions used on mentally ill inmates in state prisons, including solitary confinement. The judge found that isolating such prisoners "can and does cause serious psychological harm" and must be limited.
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NEWS
November 24, 2011 | By Dalina Castellanos, Los Angeles Times/ For the Booster Shots blog
Reports of pepper spraying at Occupy protests have been popping up all over the country, and images of those incidents have sparked many discussions about the possible excessive use of such methods. But what about the health effects on the people it's been used on? “The No. 1 effect is on the eyes. It's so toxic it makes you close your eyes almost involuntarily,” said Dr. Mark Morocco, an associate clinical professor of emergency medicine at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A federal judge Thursday called California's use of large amounts of pepper spray to subdue mentally ill prisoners a "horrific" violation of constitutional protections against cruel and unusual punishment. U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton's order requires California to continue revising policies that govern how mentally ill inmates in the state's prisons are disciplined, including the use of solitary confinement. He found that such isoaltion of mentally ill inmates "can and does cause serious psychological harm" and must be limited.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 16, 1994
In response to "Public's Demand for Pepper Spray Is Bigger Than Supply in L.A. Area," March 2: How come a person needs to obtain training in order to purchase pepper spray but anyone can purchase a lethal weapon (gun) without so much as a blink of an eye? ESTHER KRISMAN Los Angeles On the subject of pepper sprays for self-defense, the American Civil Liberties Union is right: Do more research first. Yes, it is a defensive weapon. I quote David Boyd, director of the National Institute of Justice: "A person sprayed will be forced to the knees."
SPORTS
November 8, 2012 | By Eric Pincus
A Lakers fan attacked a pair of Utah Jazz fans with a can of pepper spray after the game Wednesday night, according to Janelle Stecklein of the Salt Lake Tribune . At some point during the Lakers' 95-86 loss to the Jazz, two Lakers fans were thrown out of the game after a confrontation developed from "trash talking" with a pair of Jazz fans. Outside of the arena, the ejected fans later found their same adversaries and the argument continued. "At that point, one of the Lakers fans pulled out a pepper spray fogger and let loose with it," according to the Tribune.
NEWS
October 25, 2011 | By Richard Winton, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles police sergeant was arrested Sunday on suspicion of burglary after a woman found him inside her home near the San Bernardino National Forest and sprayed him with a potent form of pepper spray that is typically used to ward off bears, authorities said. LAPD Sgt. Lucien Daigle allegedly fled but crashed his car a few miles from the woman's Mentone home, said San Bernardino County Sheriff's Sgt. Paul Morrison. Daigle reeked of pepper spray when he was approached and had valuables inside his car that belonged to the woman, Morrison said.
BUSINESS
November 25, 2011 | By Times staff writers, Los Angeles Times
Matthew Lopez went to the Wal-Mart in Porter Ranch on Thursday night for the Black Friday sale but instead was caught in a pepper-spray attack by a woman who authorities said was "competitive shopping. " Lopez described a chaotic scene in the San Fernando Valley store among shoppers looking for video games soon after the sale began. "I heard screaming and I heard yelling," said Lopez, 18. "Moments later, my throat stung. I was coughing really bad and watering up. " Lopez said customers were already in the store when a whistle signaled the start of Black Friday at 10 p.m., sending shoppers hurtling in search of deeply discounted items.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Wells
An attorney supportive of the protesters who were pepper-sprayed two years ago at UC Davis criticized a recent decision to pay the former campus police officer involved in the incident $38,055 in worker's compensation. As the result of a claim filed with the University of California system, John Pike will receive the compensation for depression and anxiety he says he suffered after receiving death threats when his identity became known. Bernie Goldsmith, a Davis lawyer supportive of the protesters, told the Davis Enterprise  that Pike's workers' comp settlement sent a dangerous message.
OPINION
April 13, 2012
Anybody who watched last fall's viral videos of campus police officers blasting orange pepper spray into the faces of seated protesters at UC Davis could have figured out that something had gone very wrong on the Central California campus. But it took two reports on the incident by an independent university panel and paid consultants to spell out the scope of the screw-ups, which indict not just the officers holding the spray canisters but the entire campus police force, its chief, a team of university leaders and Chancellor Linda Katehi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO -- A federal judge Thursday agreed to hear evidence in the death of a California prison inmate who, while on suicide watch, was pepper sprayed by guards because he refused to remove his hands from his cell door. The inmate relied on a breathing tube, which he removed after being sprayed, and he died some eight hours later in what prison officials initially ruled a potential suicide, corrections reports show. The man's parents have accused prison officials of attempting a cover-up in the case, an allegation California prison officials adamantly deny.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Videotapes released Thursday by a federal court show mentally ill prisoners in California being forced from their cells by guards who douse them repeatedly with pepper spray. Some of the inmates are being forced to comply with medication orders; others are to be moved to new cells. The six tapes, created by guards abiding by a state policy to record all cell extractions, were shown in court in October as part of a lawsuit by inmates' lawyers seeking a ban on the use of pepper spray against the mentally ill. The tapes were ordered released by U.S. District Judge Lawrence Karlton, who is holding hearings on the issue in Sacramento.
NEWS
October 24, 2013 | By Luke O'Neil, guest blogger
Now that we all live inside hermetically-sealed political feedback bubbles when it comes to receiving and reacting to news, it's never been easier to form an opinion on a given story. That's particularly true of the type of Rorschach-test-like stories for which our opinions are already predestined -- one reader's black-ink-blot socialist plot to undermine national security is another's evidence of encroaching totalitarianism run amuck. The crazy part is, both things can be true at the same time, depending on whom you ask.  Occasionally a story comes along, however, like the news about former UC Davis police officer John Pike, a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon and Jason Wells
An attorney supportive of the protesters who were pepper-sprayed two years ago at UC Davis criticized a recent decision to pay the former campus police officer involved in the incident $38,055 in worker's compensation. As the result of a claim filed with the University of California system, John Pike will receive the compensation for depression and anxiety he says he suffered after receiving death threats when his identity became known. Bernie Goldsmith, a Davis lawyer supportive of the protesters, told the Davis Enterprise  that Pike's workers' comp settlement sent a dangerous message.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 24, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
A former UC Davis police officer who received worldwide notoriety for pepper-spraying campus protesters two years ago will be receive $38,055 in workers' compensation after claiming he suffered depression and anxiety as result of the public outcry. John Pike, who had filed for the compensation from the University of California system, also cited the stress he endured from death threats he received after the incident. Pike was fired in July 2012, after being on paid administrative leave for eight months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Paige St. John
Facing legal action over the use of force to subdue mentally ill prisoners, the California corrections department is working on new rules to curb some of the agency's practices currently under review in federal court. In testimony Wednesday before a federal judge, the state official in charge of adult prisons said he sought the changes in part because of videotapes, introduced as evidence in the case, showing half a dozen inmates who were repeatedly sprayed with large amounts of pepper spray -- even while naked and screaming for help.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
The University of California is being required to pay $38,055 in workers' compensation to the former UC Davis police officer who received worldwide notoriety for pepper spraying campus protesters two years ago. John Pike had filed for the compensation, claiming he suffered depression and anxiety after death threats resulting from the incident. Pike was fired in July 2012, after being on paid administrative leave for eight months. “This case has been resolved in accordance with state law and processes on workers' compensation,” UC Davis spokesman Andy Fell said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Testimony continued Wednesday in a federal court case on California's treatment of mentally ill prisoners. Dr. Pablo Stewart, a psychiatrist, testified about the care that California's condemned prisoners receive, telling of a psychotic inmate who tried to kill himself three times - even punching pens through his eyes. The man was kept on death row rather than hospitalized, Stewart said, because he signed an agreement to take his drugs and attend therapy sessions.
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