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March 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama sure can pick 'em - at least as far as NCAA brackets are concerned. While most Americans and even so-called experts saw their brackets busted in the opening rounds of the college basketball tournament, Obama fared surprisingly well. He ranks in the 98th percentile in ESPN's "Tournament Challenge," with 460 out of a possible 640 points. That's good for a rank of No. 131,052 out of the millions submitted on the network's website. Obama missed on 13 of the 48 games played so far. The overall leader on ESPN missed just six games.
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NEWS
March 19, 2012 | By Michael A. Memoli
President Obama sure can pick 'em - at least as far as NCAA brackets are concerned. While most Americans and even so-called experts saw their brackets busted in the opening rounds of the college basketball tournament, Obama fared surprisingly well. He ranks in the 98th percentile in ESPN's "Tournament Challenge," with 460 out of a possible 640 points. That's good for a rank of No. 131,052 out of the millions submitted on the network's website. Obama missed on 13 of the 48 games played so far. The overall leader on ESPN missed just six games.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000
The article "School Loses in API Numbers Game," (Oct. 17) about the Anaheim junior high school improving its students' test scores but having a lower average score due to changing demographics, demonstrates a major flaw with the current measuring process. Schools should be rated by summing the changes of scores registered by individuals. For example, if Timmy scored in the 25th percentile last year at another school and scores in the 35th percentile this year, it is a great result for Timmy's teacher and Timmy's current school, regardless of his class' or school's average test scores.
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "Dual-Language Classes Train for Diversity," Sept. 3: District officials at Santa Ana say that the Jefferson and Martin Luther King Jr. schools have proved successful. Looking at the Stanford 9 scores, I see that Jefferson has 62% of its fifth-grade students below the 50th percentile, and Martin has 87% of its students below the 50th percentile. That is hardly successful. About seven years ago, Davis Elementary chose to be a dual-immersion school. Davis talked of the same incremental Spanish/English throughout the grade levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 1999
"A School From Scratch" (Jan. 6), about the Watts Learning Center, correctly pointed out how difficult it is to start up a charter school. Among other things, the Watts school has not been given state resources for facilities, and it has been deprived of federal funds. In spite of these difficulties, the Watts Learning Center has produced outstanding results. For example, the reading scores of our students last year jumped to the 82nd percentile nationally, up from the 40th percentile in pretests.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1989
Officials at West High School in Torrance have decided they will not try to identify the seniors who deliberately flunked this year's California Assessment Program test, saying it would be nearly impossible to track down every sabotaged test. Principal William Bawden said administrators had considered identifying the tests in order to recalculate the West High scores but decided Thursday that it would be difficult to accurately identify every test. "It would just be too hard to find all of them," Bawden said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1990
I would like to add two more fictional applicants to Paredes' list: The third is an Asian, a graduate of public high school in a working-class neighborhood with nearly a straight-A average and test scores in the 94th percentile. He works part-time and does not have affluent parents. His application probably would be turned down under the proposed Tom Hayden bill because he has to compete with many other Asian applicants who have similar or superior academic records. The fourth applicant is from another minority group, a graduate of a prestigious private high school with an A average and test scores in the 65th percentile.
OPINION
September 15, 2002
Re "Dual-Language Classes Train for Diversity," Sept. 3: District officials at Santa Ana say that the Jefferson and Martin Luther King Jr. schools have proved successful. Looking at the Stanford 9 scores, I see that Jefferson has 62% of its fifth-grade students below the 50th percentile, and Martin has 87% of its students below the 50th percentile. That is hardly successful. About seven years ago, Davis Elementary chose to be a dual-immersion school. Davis talked of the same incremental Spanish/English throughout the grade levels.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1989 | TIM WATERS and HUGO MARTIN, Times Staff Writers
Officials at West High School in Torrance are debating whether to ask state education officials to revise the school's California Assessment Program test score because a group of seniors intentionally flunked the exam. Assistant Supt. Arnold Plank said Wednesday that the state Department of Education has indicated it would be willing to help West High recalculate the score by pulling the scores of students the school suspects of deliberately flunking. The department also indicated it would consider substituting the new score for the old one if the school can document carefully how it determined who flunked the test on purpose, Plank said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 1, 1998
I applaud Supt. Charles Weis and the other Ventura County school officials for releasing the standardized test scores of schools. I also agree with those who point to the difficulty in interpreting the scores--but not because the scores are lowered by non-English-speaking students. That is easy to interpret and understand. The greater problem is that the scores presented are not the fraction of questions answered correctly but the percentile placement of the school among all schools in the nation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 2001 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Good things, they say, come in small packages. So it is perhaps fitting that it is Los Angeles first-graders who are providing some of the best news the Los Angeles Unified School District has received in some time. The district reported Tuesday that its first-graders are for the first time performing above average in reading and spelling, scoring in the 56th percentile nationally.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
Regarding "Forcing Standardized Tests on Diverse Kids," by Sandy Banks (Jan. 28): The folly of standardized testing might no better be seen than in the example of my sixth-grade son. Evan's school non-[Stanford 9] test results confirm he reads at the college level, is as many as six achievement years ahead of his class in science, social studies, math and general knowledge, and has a 99.9-plus percentile IQ. Yet Evan, who reasons and orates like an attorney, is unable to put to paper any but his simplest thoughts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000
The article "School Loses in API Numbers Game," (Oct. 17) about the Anaheim junior high school improving its students' test scores but having a lower average score due to changing demographics, demonstrates a major flaw with the current measuring process. Schools should be rated by summing the changes of scores registered by individuals. For example, if Timmy scored in the 25th percentile last year at another school and scores in the 35th percentile this year, it is a great result for Timmy's teacher and Timmy's current school, regardless of his class' or school's average test scores.
NEWS
July 18, 2000
This year The Times is publishing school results for the statewide Stanford 9 tests as the percentages of students at or above the 50th percentile ranks, which are the national averages for specific test subjects and grades. Previously, The Times published schools' mean percentile ranks, which are schools' rankings in comparison with those of other schools nationwide. The California Department of Education provides three other measures to choose from as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1999 | DOUG SMITH, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Gov. Gray Davis told a conference of 6,000 teachers and other educators Saturday that the state will provide $150 bonuses per student to every public school in California that improves its scores five percentile points on next spring's Stanford 9 test. The state will also offer cash awards of $5,000 to 400 elementary and middle schools that win a reading contest, based not on performance but on the number of pages their students read, he added.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR and LISA RICHARDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Orange County's students continued to outstrip their peers statewide in California's second administration of the Stanford 9 standardized exam, even though the county is home to a higher proportion of students who don't speak English fluently. According to test results released Thursday, Orange County public school pupils ranked five to 10 percentile points higher than students statewide in every subject and grade level tested by the high-stakes Stanford 9.
NEWS
February 5, 2001
Regarding "Forcing Standardized Tests on Diverse Kids," by Sandy Banks (Jan. 28): The folly of standardized testing might no better be seen than in the example of my sixth-grade son. Evan's school non-[Stanford 9] test results confirm he reads at the college level, is as many as six achievement years ahead of his class in science, social studies, math and general knowledge, and has a 99.9-plus percentile IQ. Yet Evan, who reasons and orates like an attorney, is unable to put to paper any but his simplest thoughts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1999 | KATE FOLMAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Fountain Valley School District this year improved on already laudable standardized test scores, besting the national average, according to results released Tuesday. Just one of the elementary school district's test scores--eighth-grade spelling at Samuel E. Talbert Middle School--dipped below the 50th percentile on the Stanford 9 exam. Fountain Valley's highest scores came from William T.
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