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Peregrine Fund

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1989 | PATRICIA WARD BIEDERMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tim Rudnick looks up whenever he hears pigeons fuss. When he's lucky, he sees the most fascinating of his neighbors, a rare peregrine falcon that has been hanging around the 300 block of Market Street in Venice. One of the fastest birds in the world, the peregrine can swoop down on a pigeon or other avian entree at speeds up to 200 m.p.h. Rudnick, 46, first saw the stately bird of prey about three months ago.
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NEWS
September 23, 1990 | MERCER CROSS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
The bald eagle in flight is a riveting spectacle, its white head and white tail feathers contrasting starkly with its dark-brown six-foot wings as it soars high above the South Branch of the Potomac River. In its nearby nest in a tall white pine, one of two known eagle nests in West Virginia, two fledgling chicks wait to be fed, perhaps with a fish the hunting parent finds along the river bank.
SPORTS
March 18, 1987 | EARL GUSTKEY, Times Staff Writer
Quick now, where's the best wildlife show in California? Riding boats off the coast to watch the California gray whale migration? Watching wintertime arrivals of hundreds of thousands of waterfowl to the huge federal refuges on the California-Oregon line? How about watching pronghorn antelopes race across the flatlands of Modoc County? All good, no doubt about it. But, believe it or not, the best California wildlife show may very well be in downtown Los Angeles.
NEWS
March 30, 2001 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
A California condor has laid an egg in the wild--the first in 15 years and a key signal that the giant bird that once hovered on the brink of extinction is strengthening its grip on life outside of zoos. Discovery of the lone egg, found Sunday in a remote cave on a cliff in the northeast corner of the Grand Canyon, marks the first time since an ambitious recovery program began that the big vultures have successfully mated in the wild.
NEWS
September 18, 1993 | JOANNA M. MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Twelve California condors from captive breeding programs in Los Angeles and San Diego will be moved next week to a new facility in Idaho, U.S. Fish and Wildlife officials announced Friday. The move will mark the first time in the history of the $15-million condor recovery program that the endangered birds, which once roamed across North America, will be bred outside California, said Robert Mesta, who coordinates the Condor Recovery Program based in Ventura.
NEWS
November 28, 2001 | Associated Press
Eleven California condors arrived at their new home Tuesday near the Grand Canyon where they will spend several months getting acclimated before wildlife officials release them into the wild. The condors were transported from Idaho to Marble Canyon in northern Arizona on a U.S. Forest Service plane. From there they were taken to an aviary atop the Vermilion Cliffs, southwest of Lake Powell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2002 | David Kelly, Times Staff Writer
The recent deaths of three California condor chicks born in the wild is bringing a new, more hands-on management style to a program to save the rare birds. But critics say the changes do nothing to remedy fundamental flaws in the $35-million project. Although condors have been coddled in captivity and closely monitored in the wild for two decades, the three turkey-sized chicks died last month. One had eaten everything from bottle caps to metal screws.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 1998 | GARY POLAKOVIC, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sixteen years after nearly becoming extinct, California condors are making a surprising comeback, expanding their numbers and their range far beyond the Ventura County back country where the ambitious experiment to rescue them began. Scientists credit new chick rearing and release strategies for enabling the condor to wing its way back from the brink of annihilation. In the last decade, the California condor population has increased fivefold, to 150 birds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2008 | Margot Roosevelt, Times Staff Writer
The California condor, rescued from extinction in an elaborate and expensive recovery effort, has become tantamount to a zoo animal in the wild and can't survive on its own without a ban on lead ammunition across its vast Western ranges, a scientific study has concluded. The majestic scavengers, bred in captivity and released to nature in recent decades, require "constant and costly human assistance," a blue-ribbon panel of the American Ornithologists' Union reported this week.
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