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Performance Enhancing Drugs

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March 3, 1989 | MAL FLORENCE
UCLA track Coach Bob Larsen said Thursday that Francis' remarks were erroneous when he said it was impossible to compete in track and field at the world-class level without the aid of chemical substances. Larsen said that four of his athletes, Steve Lewis, Danny Everett, Mike Marsh, and Kevin Young, represented the United States in the Seoul Olympics and were tested extensively during training and while competing, especially Lewis, the gold medalist in the 400 meters.
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March 28, 2014 | By Kevin Baxter
The agreement announced Friday between Major League Baseball and the players' union to stiffen penalties for those caught using performance-enhancing drugs was applauded by players who said they are tired of seeing the sport embarrassed by cheaters. "That's something that the players have been interested in and pushing for a long time," Dodgers catcher A.J. Ellis said. "We want to make this game clean and we want the penalties harsh for guys who want to violate the agreement. " Under the new deal, the most significant toughening of the drug protocol in eight years, the penalty for a first offense increases from 50 to 80 games and the penalty for a second violation jumps from 100 games to 162, the equivalent of a full season.
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SPORTS
July 18, 1988 | RANDY HARVEY, Times Staff Writer
When Carl Lewis charged last year in an interview with the British Broadcasting Corp. that world-class athletes have died from the use of performance-enhancing drugs, such as anabolic steroids, skeptics told him to name one. He could have named Birgit Dressel. Dressel, a West German heptathlete, finished fourth in the European Championships and was ranked No. 6 in the world in 1986. On April 10, 1987, she died after three days of agonizing pain in a Mainz, West Germany, hospital. She was 26.
SPORTS
November 24, 2013 | Wire reports
Free-agent shortstop Jhonny Peralta and the St. Louis Cardinals have agreed on a four-year contract, giving the All-Star a fresh start after his Biogenesis drug suspension last summer. The Cardinals filled a need by getting a top-hitting shortstop a month after losing the World Series in six games to Boston. Pete Kozma and Daniel Descalso , although generally good fielders, are light hitters. The deal was expected to be worth more than $50 million. "We are pleased to announce that Jhonny has agreed to terms and I know he is equally excited to be joining the Cardinals," General Manager John Mozeliak said in a statement.
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July 18, 1990 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chuck DeBus, a Los Angeles track and field coach, has been suspended for life by The Athletics Congress for his alleged role in promoting the use of performance-enhancing drugs by athletes he coached.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2011 | By Maura Dolan, Los Angeles Times
Capping a national scandal over steroid use among star athletes, home run king Barry Bonds goes to trial Monday, accused of lying under oath in a case that will include big-name ballplayers and an ex-mistress ready to testify about Bonds' sexual ineptitude. The federal trial comes almost a decade after the start of a probe that sparked hearings before Congress, exposed the secret use of performance-enhancing drugs by many of the nation's most admired athletes and forced professional sports to grapple with reforms.
SPORTS
May 19, 2010 | From staff and wire reports
Floyd Landis , who was stripped of his victory in the 2006 Tour de France after a positive doping test, has acknowledged his use of performance-enhancing drugs and accused other riders — including seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong — of doping, the Wall Street Journal reported on its website Wednesday night. Landis sent a series of e-mails to cycling officials describing the use of performance-enhancing drugs by him and other riders but was not available to comment, the paper reported.
SPORTS
December 13, 2007 | Dylan Hernandez and Lance Pugmire, Times Staff Writers
Former Sen. George Mitchell's report on the use of performance-enhancing drugs in baseball will be made public today, ending 21 months of speculation about the names and details contained in its pages. Mitchell, who was appointed by Commissioner Bud Selig to lead the investigation, will discuss his findings at a news conference in midtown Manhattan, set to start at 11 a.m. PST. Two-and-a-half hours later, Selig will hold his own news conference less than a mile away.
SPORTS
July 13, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Enjoy the All-Star Game. Because when Tuesday's celebration of baseball's superstars is over, the process of suspending some of those same players for drug use will resume. It figures to be a slow, painful ordeal - one that could disrupt the pennant races, has already reopened old wounds between baseball and the powerful players' union, will lead to months if not years of litigation and drag the sport's long-tarnished reputation through the mud once again. It's an ordeal that will end some careers, ruin others and indelibly mark the legacy of Commissioner Bud Selig.
SPORTS
July 5, 2011 | By Lance Pugmire
Roger Clemens' federal criminal trial on six counts — including obstruction of Congress, making false statements to Congress and committing perjury before Congress — is scheduled to begin Wednesday in Washington. The trial of perhaps the dominant pitcher of a generation, starting with jury selection, is expected to last four to six weeks, Clemens, a seven-time Cy Young Award winner, faces a maximum prison sentence of 30 years if convicted of the charges, which arose after he testified in February 2008 before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform.
SPORTS
October 31, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
In Boston this week, a patchwork collection of athletes with grimy beards and dirt-caked knees had the remarkable strength to elevate a city torn by tragedy. A baseball season that began with the horror of the Boston Marathon bombing ended with the magic of a Boston Red Sox world championship. When the Red Sox beat the St. Louis Cardinals and clinched a title at swaggering, swooning Fenway Park for the first time in 95 years, you really wanted to believe this was another example of Boston Strong.
SPORTS
October 4, 2013 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Albert Pujols wasn't bluffing. The Angels slugger followed through on his threat of legal action, filing a defamation lawsuit Friday in Missouri against Jack Clark for his accusation that Pujols used performance-enhancing drugs. In the suit, Pujols accuses Clark of disseminating "malicious, reckless and outrageous falsehoods" about him, and says Clark's accusations were "an outrageous ploy to generate attention and ratings" for Clark's new sports-radio talk show. Clark, whose show began airing on WGNU in St. Louis early in August, based his accusation on conversations he said he had with Chris Mihlfeld, Pujols' former personal trainer.
SPORTS
August 12, 2013 | Bill Dwyre
Albert Pujols needs to come through in the clutch, and we're not talking home runs or RBIs here. Pujols needs to pursue his lawsuit against Jack Clark. Call it slander. Call it defamation of character. But don't call it off. Last week, Pujols was accused by Clark, on a radio show in St. Louis, of having been a juicer, of taking performance-enhancing drugs during a major league career that has already included three most-valuable-player awards and will, barring shocking proof that Clark was accurate, be celebrated with first-ballot inclusion in the Hall of Fame.
SPORTS
August 5, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
The saddest part of another syringe-spitting afternoon in baseball Monday occurred when, for one of the first times this summer, Alex Rodriguez spoke the truth. He had just been hit with a drug suspension bigger than Barry Bonds' neck, a record 211 games that would carry him through next season and probably end his career. Yet he was dragging baseball further through the pill-littered muck by appealing the suspension. In fact, in a bit of breathtaking irony, his injured hip finally healed, he was using the exact day his suspension was announced to make his 2013 debut.
SPORTS
August 4, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
Major League Baseball is likely to announce Monday a suspension of New York Yankees star Alex Rodriguez through the end of the 2014 season for using banned performance-enhancing drugs. The discipline, however, might not keep baseball's active home runs leader off the field should he appeal the punishment. A baseball official unauthorized to speak publicly on the matter described the situation as "extremely fluid" Sunday night, but said league officials expect Rodriguez to appeal.
SPORTS
July 27, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Players turn their backs on Braun Milwaukee Brewers slugger Ryan Braun is getting no love from his peers after agreeing last week to a season-ending 65-game suspension for using performance-enhancing drugs. Although none of Braun's teammates have criticized Braun publicly, several reporters who have been around the Brewers clubhouse say privately players have expressed satisfaction with the suspension. And the rest of the league is equally angry with the former National League most valuable player.
SPORTS
September 15, 2010 | By Lance Pugmire
Federal prosecutors have obtained a telephone conversation secretly recorded six years ago by three-time Tour de France champion Greg LeMond in which he and a woman close to Lance Armstrong discuss her being present in 1996 when others say Armstrong told his cancer doctors about his use of performance-enhancing drugs. The tape recording and transcript of that conversation are expected to be presented to a federal grand jury in Los Angeles looking into charges of widespread drug use in professional cycling, according to sources close to the investigation who are not authorized to speak publicly about it. Prosecutors have subpoenaed the woman who sources say is Stephanie McIlvain, a longtime liaison to Armstrong for one of his major sponsors, the eyewear company Oakley Inc. LeMond was calling McIlvain in connection with a separate business dispute he was having with one of his sponsors when he raised the subject of what McIlvain heard in Armstrong's Indiana hospital room.
SPORTS
February 24, 2012 | By Kevin Baxter
So much for the dust-up over National League most valuable player Ryan Braun's testing positive for performance-enhancing drugs and potentially forfeiting the award to the Dodgers' Matt Kemp, who finished second in the voting. Braun's positive test result and the 50-game suspension that went with it were thrown out Thursday by baseball arbitrator Shyam Das, clearing the former Granada Hills High standout to play for the Milwaukee Brewers on opening day in April. It marked the first time a baseball player has successfully challenged a drug-related penalty in a grievance.
SPORTS
July 23, 2013 | Bill Plaschke
There is a titillating chart accompanying this column that lists the actual winners of baseball's MVP and Cy Young awards if every phony winner who was busted for steroids was stripped of the prize. Ignore it. My editors wasted their time. The list is as worthless as a Ryan Braun promise ring. The reason is as obvious as Braun's lies. How can you insist a cheater give up an award to someone who also may have cheated? So goes the real shame in Braun's season-ending PED suspension from the Milwaukee Brewers this week.
SPORTS
July 13, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Enjoy the All-Star Game. Because when Tuesday's celebration of baseball's superstars is over, the process of suspending some of those same players for drug use will resume. It figures to be a slow, painful ordeal - one that could disrupt the pennant races, has already reopened old wounds between baseball and the powerful players' union, will lead to months if not years of litigation and drag the sport's long-tarnished reputation through the mud once again. It's an ordeal that will end some careers, ruin others and indelibly mark the legacy of Commissioner Bud Selig.
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