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Performance Evaluations

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BUSINESS
May 30, 1994
D o you have a question about an on-the-job situation? If so, please mail it to Shop Talk, Los Angeles Times, P.O. Box 2008, Costa Mesa, Calif. 92626. Or call (714) 966-7873 and leave a voice mail message. Questions of general interest will be answered in this column on Mondays. Question: My boss won't let more than two people at a time take vacation in our department, although we manage just fine when a lot more than that are out with flu, vacations or sick children.
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NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Karin Klein
The debate -- and that's putting it nicely -- over the use of standardized test scores in teacher evaluations has always confused me, because the answer seemed so simple. One of the things we ask of teachers -- but just one thing -- is to raise those scores. So they have some place in the evaluation. But how much? Easy. Get some good evidence and base the decisions on that, not on guessing. The quality of education is at stake, as well as people's livelihoods. Much to my surprise, at a meeting with the editorial board this week, Michelle Rhee agreed, more or less.
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BUSINESS
June 12, 1995
Q: Some companies, such as Federal Express, use an evaluation process that allows the lower levels of staff to evaluate their managers' performance, giving them a rating of how effective they are as managers. Is this type of reciprocal evaluation, which is forwarded to the higher mangers, more effective than having the evaluations done by their supervisors? What are the reasons that some companies use this method, and how successful is it? --S.K.
OPINION
August 16, 2012
In many ways, the recently resurrected Assembly Bill 5 would bring needed clarity and rigor to the performance evaluations of California's public school teachers. It nicely balances minimum requirements for all teachers and considerable control by local school districts. What a shame, then, that it also would weaken a key aspect of existing law, making the new bill unworthy of support when it comes before the Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday. Teachers unions hate the idea of including student progress on the state standards tests in performance evaluations, but as one court recently ruled, that is state law. And it's a law that should stand.
OPINION
August 16, 2012
In many ways, the recently resurrected Assembly Bill 5 would bring needed clarity and rigor to the performance evaluations of California's public school teachers. It nicely balances minimum requirements for all teachers and considerable control by local school districts. What a shame, then, that it also would weaken a key aspect of existing law, making the new bill unworthy of support when it comes before the Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday. Teachers unions hate the idea of including student progress on the state standards tests in performance evaluations, but as one court recently ruled, that is state law. And it's a law that should stand.
OPINION
May 15, 2012
Now that most states have received or applied for relief from the No Child Left Behind Act, California is submitting its own proposal . And in true California fashion, it's - different. The state has long been at odds with the U.S. Education Department over the waiver process. Both sides agree that the federal law is flawed to the point of being counterproductive. But California won't agree to do what other states have promised to get out from under the law's most punitive measures: include standardized test scores as a significant component in the performance evaluations of individual teachers.
OPINION
August 8, 2012
Every time a proposal to reform the hiring and firing of teachers is put forward in California, it's just as complicated and, in ways, as counterproductive as the current system. Ousting teachers here is ruinously protracted and expensive and, ultimately, nearly impossible. Legislation to fix this regularly fails, in part because the bills aren't well conceived, but mostly because of opposition from the California Teachers Assn. and reluctance by Democratic politicians who rely on the union for support.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1999
Q: Do you have any tips on motivating a manager to give performance reviews on time? My manager is supposed to give them every six months. No matter how much I remind her, it's never done more often than once a year. --A.N., Anaheim * A: Unfortunately, many managers see performance reviews as simply another chore in an already crowded schedule. However, regular performance evaluations are one of a supervisor's most important tasks.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Karin Klein
The debate -- and that's putting it nicely -- over the use of standardized test scores in teacher evaluations has always confused me, because the answer seemed so simple. One of the things we ask of teachers -- but just one thing -- is to raise those scores. So they have some place in the evaluation. But how much? Easy. Get some good evidence and base the decisions on that, not on guessing. The quality of education is at stake, as well as people's livelihoods. Much to my surprise, at a meeting with the editorial board this week, Michelle Rhee agreed, more or less.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1997 | ROGER VINCENT, Roger Vincent can be reached at roger.vincent@latimes.com
One-on-one job performance reviews can be unnerving enough, so the possibility of being rated by peers and subordinates can jolt anxiety levels even higher. Nevertheless, many companies and their employees are deciding that evaluations from several sources provide a more complete and balanced picture of individual performance.
OPINION
August 8, 2012
Every time a proposal to reform the hiring and firing of teachers is put forward in California, it's just as complicated and, in ways, as counterproductive as the current system. Ousting teachers here is ruinously protracted and expensive and, ultimately, nearly impossible. Legislation to fix this regularly fails, in part because the bills aren't well conceived, but mostly because of opposition from the California Teachers Assn. and reluctance by Democratic politicians who rely on the union for support.
OPINION
May 15, 2012
Now that most states have received or applied for relief from the No Child Left Behind Act, California is submitting its own proposal . And in true California fashion, it's - different. The state has long been at odds with the U.S. Education Department over the waiver process. Both sides agree that the federal law is flawed to the point of being counterproductive. But California won't agree to do what other states have promised to get out from under the law's most punitive measures: include standardized test scores as a significant component in the performance evaluations of individual teachers.
SPORTS
November 1, 2011 | By Lisa Dillman
For Drew Doughty , the weekend reviews were almost as expected after having missed two weeks because of an injured right shoulder. The defenseman played at Phoenix on Saturday and at Colorado the following day and was a minus-two and had one assist in the Kings' loss to the Avalanche. "Drew has played with a great deal of 'I-want-to-do-it,' " Coach Terry Murray said after practice Tuesday. "And he wants to make a difference every time he is on the ice every shift, and sometimes you can get yourself into a little bit of a jackpot when you go into that with that attitude.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 2, 2011 | By Gretchen Meier, Los Angeles Times
Burbank officials are refusing to release the amount of bonuses paid to individual public employees, arguing in a legal filing that the information would reveal private performance evaluations and erode workplace morale. The argument was filed in response to a lawsuit by the Burbank Leader to obtain the information. Senior Assistant City Atty. Juli Scott dismissed the arguments and legal precedent cited by Karlene W. Goller — an attorney for the Leader's parent company, the Los Angeles Times — and Karl Olson of the San Francisco-based firm Ram, Olson, Cereghino & Kopczynski.
OPINION
March 24, 2010 | By Timothy Daly and Arun Ramanathan
Over the last several weeks, in what has become a dismal rite of spring, nearly 30,000 teachers throughout California received layoff notices. Knowing how crucial teachers are to student success, you might wonder how schools make the difficult decision of which teachers to cut. After all, if layoffs are unavoidable, you would think that it would be in the interest of everyone to keep the best teachers and cut those who are least effective. Unfortunately, the only tool that California schools can use to make these decisions is a calendar.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
U.S. airlines' on-time performance declined dramatically in December compared with the previous month, but improved slightly over a year earlier, the Transportation Department said. The carriers blamed heavy snowstorms around the Christmas holiday and aviation system issues for contributing to some delays. The 19 carriers reporting on-time performance recorded an overall on-time arrival rate of 65.3%, up from 64.3% a year earlier but down from 83.3% in November. Regional carrier Comair, a unit of Delta Air Lines Inc., had the worst on-time performance in December, while Hawaiian Airlines had the best.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1995 | GRAEF CRYSTAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Graef Crystal, one of the nation's foremost experts on executive compensation, is editor of the Crystal Report and adjunct professor of organizational behavior and industrial relations at the Haas School of Business at University of California, Berkeley. Beginning with this article, he will contribute occasionally to Sunday Business. and
Back in 1991, when the screaming about American executive pay reached its zenith, critics like me hammered away at two major problems: First, we claimed, CEO and other senior executive pay was too high; second, we pointed out, pay was relatively insensitive to corporate performance. Apparently deciding that solving both problems at once was too hard a job, the business community commenced working on the second problem: pay sensitivity.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2007 | Karen E. Klein, Special to The Times
Dear Karen: I am interviewing candidates for sales vice president at my firm but realized I don't have a way to measure my new executive's success other than quarterly reports. I've heard about 30-60-90-day sales plans. Can you explain how they work? Answer: A 30-60-90 day sales plan, with a weekly "client pipeline review," is a method for setting specific sales goals and monitoring progress toward those goals, said Rob Hubsher, principal of New York-based consultancy Sales Optimization Group.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Services
Delta Air Lines' regional subsidiary Comair had the worst on-time performance in July among airlines surveyed by the Transportation Department. Carriers recorded an overall on-time arrival rate of 75.7% in July, higher than July 2007's 69.8% and June 2008's 70.8%. The carriers canceled 1.7% of their scheduled domestic flights in July, lower than the 2.1% cancellation rate of July 2007 and the 1.8% rate posted in June.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2008 | From the Associated Press
About a quarter of domestic flights failed to arrive on time in 2007 -- the industry's second-poorest performance on record -- and analysts say the situation is only likely to worsen. More than 26% of commercial flights in the U.S. arrived late or were canceled last year as rising passenger demand and an industry preference for smaller planes intensified congestion in the skies and on runways.
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