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October 17, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
The Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts will officially open its doors Thursday evening with a black-tie gala co-hosted by Robert Redford, Brad Pitt and  Jamie Tisch, as well as its namesake, who gave $25 million to build what is nicknamed “The Wallis.” On Thursday morning staffers rushed through the $70 million, 2.5-acre site at the intersection of Santa Monica Boulevard and Canon Drive, getting the two buildings -- the renovated, expanded...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2014 | Martha Groves
The Fine Arts Theater in Beverly Hills, a classic Art Deco venue with a celebrity-studded past, has been sold to Paula Kent Meehan, the philanthropist who also is buying the Beverly Hills Courier. Built on Wilshire Boulevard in 1936 as the Regina, the compact, single-screen theater served for years as a venue for small premieres that drew Hollywood A-listers. In 1948, it was renamed the Fine Arts Theater and showed the premiere of "The Red Shoes. " Among the invited guests were Susan Hayward, Joan Crawford, Ava Gardner and Shirley Temple.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 31, 1995 | Martin Bernheimer, Martin Bernheimer is The Times' music and dance critic
It was a happy, sad, frustrating, exhilarating, discouraging, encouraging, soothing, frazzling, stimulating, depressing, uplifting, bracing, painful, provocative, dull, exciting, lackadaisical, exceptional, humdrum year. Just like 1994.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2014 | By Margaret Gray
You may have seen your share of makeovers, but nothing like the one Sheila Callaghan inflicts on her heroine in “Everything You Touch,” her lushly written dark comedy world-premiering at Boston Court Performing Arts Center. Three glamorous models descend on Jess (Kirsten Vangsness), shrieking like birds of prey, while Victor, a histrionic fashion designer (Tyler Pierce), shouts insults at her. She staggers out of the fracas in a leopard-print swing coat. CRITICS' PICKS: What to watch, where to go, what to eat This scene laid bare the savagery at the heart of every makeover, and it would have won me over - if Jessica Kubzansky's bold, lucid staging of Callaghan's theatrical vision hadn't already done so. Although at moments the script feels as if it's still evolving, the stunning production values highlight its best features (a bit like a makeover, come to think of it)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Howard Blume
One principal quit even before the flagship arts high school in downtown Los Angeles enrolled its first students in 2009. The school opened with two leaders, and both were gone by the end of the first year. The next principal lasted a year. Two high-profile principals from arts high schools elsewhere accepted the job twice - and backed out twice. Now it's happened again. After less than two years on the job, Norman Isaacs has resigned as principal of the Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2000 | DIANE HAITHMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The move from England to Los Angeles was less traumatic for David Sefton, new director of UCLA Performing Arts, than it was for his cat, Bob. Bob, traveling in an athletic bag because his familiar pet carrier was not allowed on the plane, would fall asleep occasionally--but after each nap wake up with a howl, reliving the insult of being transported like a pair of Nikes. Sefton, whose tenure began Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 2013 | By Howard Blume
The third time was the charm in efforts to land a high-profile New York City educator to head the $232-million downtown Los Angeles arts high school. Or was it the fourth time? Kim Bruno, the longtime head of the LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts, has accepted the job of principal at the Cortines School of Visual and Performing Arts. Bruno had tentatively accepted the post at the 4-year-old campus at least twice before, but this time officials in the Los Angeles Unified School District are certain that she is switching coasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 2013 | By David Ng
Cathy Rigby, the former Olympic gymnast turned stage actress, is being sued for millions of dollars by a composer who claims that he hasn't been properly paid for his work on a production of "Peter Pan" that her company presented at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts in 2004 and on a national tour. Composer Craig Barna is claiming that McCoy Rigby Entertainment has breached its contract with him and has continued using music he created and orchestrated for the show without properly compensating him, according to court papers obtained by The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 21, 2013 | By Mike Boehm
Thirteen arts and cultural institutions have made the most recent top 400 list of American charities, ranked by the donations they took in. They include one Southern California organization, the San Diego Zoo, which raised $57.65 million to rank 363rd. Also in the Top 400 list compiled by the Chronicle of Philanthropy were the Smithsonian Institution and five other museums, four performing arts organizations, one hybrid (the Woodruff Arts Center in Atlanta, whose tenants include the High Museum of Art, the Atlanta Symphony and the Alliance Theatre)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 1985
As a patron of the performing arts, I was flabbergasted beyond belief when I read the Music News item on Russian-born violinist Viktoria Mullova ("Defections & Reflections," by Marc Shulgold, April 7). I have yet to discover the rationale of a U.S. foundation donating a $349,000 Stradavarius violin to a much-acclaimed, well-established, world-renowned violinist who presumingly fled the Soviet Union for artistic freedom. Not only has she gained artistic freedom, but a strong financial backing as well in America.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 2014 | By Steve Appleford
Barely three months after their release from Russian prison, Masha Alekhina and Nadya Tolokonnikova sit outside a Santa Monica hotel, smoking cigarettes, insisting that their group Pussy Riot is not a band. "People sometimes think we are a musical group and think we can do a performance," Tolokonnikova, 24, says with a smile, leaning forward. Alekhina, 25, nods between drags, and adds, "But it's not true. We're another thing. " Still, the noise from a notorious one-song performance of "A Punk Prayer" inside Moscow's Orthodox Christian cathedral in 2012 was potent and outrageous enough to land the pair a nearly two-year prison stay in the Gulag for what prosecutors called "hooliganism motivated by religious hatred.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Shortly after assuming the helm as the fourth director of the Museum of Contemporary Art last month, Philippe Vergne visited the Los Angeles Times to meet with editors and writers. Still in the beginning stage of absorbing MOCA's history and formulating his mission, he didn't have a great deal to share about his plans. But when asked whether he thought performance, a currently disregarded part of the museum's founding mission, was important, Vergne answered that he wouldn't call it important.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2014 | By David Ng
Theater is a superstitious profession, especially when it comes to failure. On Broadway, the Foxwoods Theatre, which served as home for the troubled musical "Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark," will officially be renamed the Lyric for its next tenant -- a revival of the musical "On the Town. "   As one of Broadway's biggest houses, the 1,900-seat Foxwoods has undergone a number of name changes since the venue opened on 42nd Street in New York in 1998. It was first called the Ford Center for the Performing Arts and was later rechristened the Hilton Theatre in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2014 | By Rick Schultz
In his recital on Thursday at the Valley Performing Arts Center in Northridge, his first in Southern California since 2009, Murray Perahia displayed a breathtaking drive and imagination playing the music of Bach, Beethoven, Schumann and Chopin. The 66-year-old pianist seemed especially focused. Opening with Bach's French Suite No. 4, Perahia's dreamy rendition of the Allemande gave way to a visceral feel for the rhythms of these Baroque dances, including a jig-like Courante and a crisply articulated Gavotte, Menuet and Gigue.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By David Ng
The future head of the National Endowment for the Arts will likely face many of the same funding challenges that have beset the organization for years, according to two former chairs of the federal arts organization. In separate interviews, Dana Gioia and actress Jane Alexander, both of whom have served as chairs of the NEA, said that the organization continues to be under-funded and that restoring cuts to its budgets will likely be at the top of the next chair's agenda. On Wednesday, Jane Chu was announced as President Obama's nominee to be chairwoman of the NEA. Chu, the president and chief executive of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts in Kansas City, Mo., faces Senate confirmation.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
The 3-year-old Valley Performing Arts Center at Cal State Northridge - a growing local hub for live music, dance, drama and other cultural events - has named Thor Steingraber as its new executive director. Steingraber, 47, was vice president of programming for the Los Angeles Music Center, where he oversaw last year's ambitious opening celebration for downtown's Grand Park. He brings 24 years of arts management experience to VPAC. He replaces Robert Bucker, who had been VPAC executive director and dean of the Mike Curb College of Arts, Media and Communication at Cal State Northridge.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 2013 | By David Ng
Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York has tapped a prominent producer from the world of commercial Broadway to serve as its next president. Jed Bernstein, whose credits include the successful revivals of "Driving Miss Daisy" and "Hair," is set to assume his new job in January, succeeding Reynold Levy, who will be  stepping down after 11 years. Choosing a commercial Broadway producer who has a background in marketing and advertising is a telling move for the nonprofit Lincoln Center.
SPORTS
July 22, 2013 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Since the firing last month of Arcadia cross country coach James O'Brien , his supporters continue trying to convince school officials to reverse their decision. A school board meeting is scheduled for Tuesday night at the performing arts building at Arcadia. Here's a link to a video released by his supporters. Arcadia won two state titles under O'Brien. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
So that's what the Wallis sounds like. It's been more than two months since Beverly Hills opened its swank Wallis Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts. But until Wednesday night the multipurpose Bram Goldsmith Theater in the transformed historic post office building had yet to be purposed for unamplified music (with the exception of a few minutes of a tony gala). The St. Lawrence String Quartet did the honors by inaugurating the Wallis' classical music series. A hall with many uses - music of all sorts, theater, dance, opera and children's shows - can be an acoustician's riskiest assignment.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 11, 2014 | David Colker
When Elaine Redfield arrived in Fullerton in 1950, it was a culture shock. Mainly because, in her view, there wasn't much culture at all in Orange County. "When I came here, the county was a great wasteland, really, culturally and intellectually," she said in a 1979 Los Angeles Times interview. Redfield, who had visited Carnegie Hall and other famed concert venues while growing up in New York, was an arts lover who became an indefatigable arts activist for her new home region.
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