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Perimenopause

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HEALTH
September 6, 2010 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm 46, and there are days when it feels like I'm completely losing my mind. I misplace my car keys, struggle to remember details of recent conversations, and can't recall seemingly anybody's name. To help cope with my mental cloudiness, I always keep an extra set of keys nearby, write endless sticky notes to myself, and frequently opt for the generic "hello" over more personalized greetings. Strategies like these may help me get through my day, but they fail to calm the nagging concern that something is seriously wrong with me. They also do nothing to combat the other "symptoms" that have developed over the last year or two, namely trouble sleeping and a vague sense of doom and gloom.
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HEALTH
September 6, 2010 | By Valerie Ulene, Special to the Los Angeles Times
I'm 46, and there are days when it feels like I'm completely losing my mind. I misplace my car keys, struggle to remember details of recent conversations, and can't recall seemingly anybody's name. To help cope with my mental cloudiness, I always keep an extra set of keys nearby, write endless sticky notes to myself, and frequently opt for the generic "hello" over more personalized greetings. Strategies like these may help me get through my day, but they fail to calm the nagging concern that something is seriously wrong with me. They also do nothing to combat the other "symptoms" that have developed over the last year or two, namely trouble sleeping and a vague sense of doom and gloom.
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HEALTH
January 27, 2003 | Dianne Partie Lange
Women who suffer from depression at some point in their lives are twice as likely to have an early perimenopause as those with no history of the mood disorder, researchers have found. The report, from the ongoing Harvard Study of Moods and Cycles, also said that women on antidepressants were three times more likely to go into perimenopause early. Perimenopause usually occurs in a woman's 40s and lasts for two to four years.
HEALTH
December 18, 2000 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Women expect menopause; it's the hormonal changes beforehand that blindside them. "I felt like I was living in someone else's body," says Debbie Greenberg, 45, who three years ago began having heavy periods, days-long headaches and "brain fog." "I didn't know what was going on. I had no clue. I wondered if I was cracking up." When her gynecologist identified her symptoms as part of perimenopause, Greenberg says, "it was validation."
HEALTH
July 5, 2004 | Valerie Ulene, Special to The Times
Sharon Pruhs was only 42 years old when she began experiencing menopausal symptoms. "I remember exactly where I was when I experienced my first hot flash," she recalls. "I was standing at the card catalog at the library." The Los Angeles librarian figured, "Here we go." But she didn't actually reach menopause until she was 54. Her experience is not uncommon. Gradual hormonal and physical changes typically start years before menopause, which begins at a woman's final menstrual period.
HEALTH
January 8, 2001
Dr. Laura Corio specializes in treating women whose bodies are undergoing the hormonal changes leading up to menopause--a phase called perimenopause that lasts anywhere from months to a decade. Perimenopause is still a mystery to many women, despite a high degree of knowledge about their reproductive systems, and few books target this stage of a woman's life.
HEALTH
March 2, 1998 | LINDA GIUCA, THE HARTFORD COURANT
When Ann Louise Gittleman wrote "Super Nutrition for Menopause" in 1992, the popular press was just beginning to explore the "change of life." In her most recent book, Gittleman addresses a related subject. Perimenopause is "a naturally occurring transition before the change," she writes in "Before the Change: Taking Charge of Your Perimenopause" (HarperSanFrancisco). Although menopause is associated with a drop in estrogen, a decline in the hormone progesterone brings on perimenopause.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2013 | By Christie D'Zurilla
Kim Fields, best known from her child-actress days as "Tootie" on "The Facts of Life" sitcom in the '80s, now has two children of her own: The second little boy was born Tuesday morning in Atlanta.  "Praise the Lord Quincy is here! 8 lbs. 8 oz. 20 inches long we are all doing great thank you for your love prayers and support!," Fields, 44, said Tuesday on Twitter .  Fields has been married to Broadway actor Christopher Morgan, 37, since July 2007, shortly after giving birth to Quincy Xavier's big brother, 6½-year-old Sebastian Alexander Morgan.
HEALTH
December 8, 2003 | Jane E. Allen, Times Staff Writer
Women who've missed several periods and wonder whether they're nearing menopause now can turn to an at-home test -- but the results may not be as conclusive as a visit to their doctor. A new test, called Menocheck, measures the level of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), a hormone that rises as a woman's body approaches the cessation of fertility.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2011
Today Julie Andrews; Mark Bittman; Martin Fletcher; Ace Frehley; Amy Sedaris and Billy Bob Thornton. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Kirsten Dunst; David Arquette; Kym Johnson; Emeril Lagasse. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Regis and Kelly Eddie Murphy. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Tracy Morgan; Chris Matthews. (N) 10 a.m. KABC The Talk Gabourey Sidibe; Katie Aselton. (N) 1 p.m. KCBS The Doctors Mannerisms; OCD. (N) 2 p.m. KCBS Dr. Phil Jealousy chips away at the trust between partners, causing problems in marriages.
BOOKS
August 17, 2003
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