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Perry Como

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Despite the impact of Elvis Presley and the rock revolution in the second half of the '50s, traditional pop singers--from Nat (King) Cole to Frank Sinatra--remained major sales forces in pop music during that period. Of them, Perry Como--the former barber from Pennsylvania who sang in a relaxed crooning style that was greatly influenced by Bing Crosby and Russ Columbo--was the hottest on the charts.
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NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Kari Howard
The other night I drove over to Christmas Tree Lane in Altadena. The night was clear. The stars vied with the glowing lights on the trees, and lost. This is how it works. You turn off all but your parking lights and coast slowly downhill, then drive back up again. (Repeat as needed.) As the lights drift overhead on the branches of the giant deodars, it feels like you're floating through Christmas. Feeling a little frazzled with your 21st-century holiday season, with its online shopping and virtual friendships?
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NEWS
November 21, 1993
Jack Fulton, 90, big-band singer and writer of such songs as "Wanted," which earned a gold record for singer Perry Como. A native of Philipsburg, Pa., Fulton began his musical career at 17 playing trombone for small-town dances. He later sang with the Mason-Dixon Orchestra and the George Olsen Orchestra in New York and with a trio that recorded the hit "Who Stole My Heart Away." Fulton and the trio joined the Paul Whiteman Orchestra in 1926.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2011 | By Scott Collins and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Roll over Bing Crosby, and tell Perry Como the news: Christmas variety specials on TV are getting a lump of coal from viewers. Once a holiday staple — the same week in 1973, easy-listening stars Como and Andy Williams each drew more than 40% of the TV audience with their respective Christmas shows — the format has lately proved about as popular as sour eggnog. That's true even when a huge star is on the marquee. ABC's "A Very Gaga Thanksgiving," a vehicle for pop diva Lady Gaga, last month produced very un-Gaga-like ratings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nick Perito, a composer and arranger who worked with Perry Como and was nominated for Emmys for telecasts of the Kennedy Center Honors, has died. He was 81. Perito died of pulmonary fibrosis Aug. 3 at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Country House in Woodland Hills. He joined Como in 1963 as the singer's long-running "The Perry Como Show" was ending, and stayed on as his music director and conductor for frequent television specials, tours and recording sessions.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perry Como, whose smooth baritone voice and likable manner made him an American pop music icon at the middle of the last century, died Saturday in Florida after a long illness. He was 87. Como's daughter, Terry Thibadeau, said her father died in his sleep at his home in the exclusive Jupiter Inlet Beach Colony in Palm Beach County.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1992 | STEPHANIE SHAPIRO, THE BALTIMORE SUN
At 80, Perry Como has distilled life to a leisurely essence: a little golf, a little TV, a nightly cocktail, lots of sleep and play with the grandchildren. If it weren't for the Perry Como Holiday Show--a five-week concert tour now under way--one could say he is downright idle these days. But after 59 years in the business, Como--also known as the "Bland Crooner," the "Barber of Civility," "Mr. Relaxation," "Mr. C"--is not about to retire.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2011 | By Scott Collins and Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
Roll over Bing Crosby, and tell Perry Como the news: Christmas variety specials on TV are getting a lump of coal from viewers. Once a holiday staple — the same week in 1973, easy-listening stars Como and Andy Williams each drew more than 40% of the TV audience with their respective Christmas shows — the format has lately proved about as popular as sour eggnog. That's true even when a huge star is on the marquee. ABC's "A Very Gaga Thanksgiving," a vehicle for pop diva Lady Gaga, last month produced very un-Gaga-like ratings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
George David Weiss, a prolific songwriter who co-wrote "Can't Help Falling in Love," "What a Wonderful World," "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" and many other pop hits, has died. He was 89. Weiss, a former longtime president of the Songwriters Guild of America, died Monday of natural causes at his home in Oldwick, N.J., the Associated Press reported. During his heyday in the 1940s, '50s and '60s, Weiss co-wrote songs that were recorded by singers such as Frank Sinatra ("Oh! What It Seemed to Be")
MAGAZINE
October 26, 1997
A federal appeals court upholds Patricia Hearst's 1976 conviction for armed bank robbery. * Sav-On offers a Soundesign portable 8-track tape player (including volume control and program indicator light) for $29.88. * A Burbank jury awards Perry Como $257,509 in damages for injuries sustained while taping a 1971 Christmas show for NBC. Como, claiming negligence, had asked for $1 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
George David Weiss, a prolific songwriter who co-wrote "Can't Help Falling in Love," "What a Wonderful World," "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" and many other pop hits, has died. He was 89. Weiss, a former longtime president of the Songwriters Guild of America, died Monday of natural causes at his home in Oldwick, N.J., the Associated Press reported. During his heyday in the 1940s, '50s and '60s, Weiss co-wrote songs that were recorded by singers such as Frank Sinatra ("Oh! What It Seemed to Be")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2005 | From a Times Staff Writer
Nick Perito, a composer and arranger who worked with Perry Como and was nominated for Emmys for telecasts of the Kennedy Center Honors, has died. He was 81. Perito died of pulmonary fibrosis Aug. 3 at the Motion Picture and Television Fund Country House in Woodland Hills. He joined Como in 1963 as the singer's long-running "The Perry Como Show" was ending, and stayed on as his music director and conductor for frequent television specials, tours and recording sessions.
NEWS
May 13, 2001 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perry Como, whose smooth baritone voice and likable manner made him an American pop music icon at the middle of the last century, died Saturday in Florida after a long illness. He was 87. Como's daughter, Terry Thibadeau, said her father died in his sleep at his home in the exclusive Jupiter Inlet Beach Colony in Palm Beach County.
MAGAZINE
October 26, 1997
A federal appeals court upholds Patricia Hearst's 1976 conviction for armed bank robbery. * Sav-On offers a Soundesign portable 8-track tape player (including volume control and program indicator light) for $29.88. * A Burbank jury awards Perry Como $257,509 in damages for injuries sustained while taping a 1971 Christmas show for NBC. Como, claiming negligence, had asked for $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1994 | ROBERT HILBURN, TIMES POP MUSIC CRITIC
Despite the impact of Elvis Presley and the rock revolution in the second half of the '50s, traditional pop singers--from Nat (King) Cole to Frank Sinatra--remained major sales forces in pop music during that period. Of them, Perry Como--the former barber from Pennsylvania who sang in a relaxed crooning style that was greatly influenced by Bing Crosby and Russ Columbo--was the hottest on the charts.
NEWS
November 21, 1993
Jack Fulton, 90, big-band singer and writer of such songs as "Wanted," which earned a gold record for singer Perry Como. A native of Philipsburg, Pa., Fulton began his musical career at 17 playing trombone for small-town dances. He later sang with the Mason-Dixon Orchestra and the George Olsen Orchestra in New York and with a trio that recorded the hit "Who Stole My Heart Away." Fulton and the trio joined the Paul Whiteman Orchestra in 1926.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1985 | JACK HAWN
You could almost envision the scene: Perry Como stretched out on a long sofa, belt loosened, shoes off, eyes closed, the phone propped up on a pillow next to his ear. Speaking from Portland, second stop on a two-month, 18-city, cross-country concert tour that began July 18 in Seattle, Como sounded about as rushed as a Sunday stroll through the park. Finally, he's meandering this way again.
NEWS
December 21, 2013 | By Kari Howard
The other night I drove over to Christmas Tree Lane in Altadena. The night was clear. The stars vied with the glowing lights on the trees, and lost. This is how it works. You turn off all but your parking lights and coast slowly downhill, then drive back up again. (Repeat as needed.) As the lights drift overhead on the branches of the giant deodars, it feels like you're floating through Christmas. Feeling a little frazzled with your 21st-century holiday season, with its online shopping and virtual friendships?
ENTERTAINMENT
December 22, 1992 | STEPHANIE SHAPIRO, THE BALTIMORE SUN
At 80, Perry Como has distilled life to a leisurely essence: a little golf, a little TV, a nightly cocktail, lots of sleep and play with the grandchildren. If it weren't for the Perry Como Holiday Show--a five-week concert tour now under way--one could say he is downright idle these days. But after 59 years in the business, Como--also known as the "Bland Crooner," the "Barber of Civility," "Mr. Relaxation," "Mr. C"--is not about to retire.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1985 | JACK HAWN
You could almost envision the scene: Perry Como stretched out on a long sofa, belt loosened, shoes off, eyes closed, the phone propped up on a pillow next to his ear. Speaking from Portland, second stop on a two-month, 18-city, cross-country concert tour that began July 18 in Seattle, Como sounded about as rushed as a Sunday stroll through the park. Finally, he's meandering this way again.
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