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Perry Farrell

ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1987
For someone who looks like the village idiot, Perry Farrell is awfully quick to label others "fool" and "moron." His sophomoric boasting extinguished any minor interest I might have had in his music. It will be most amusing to see his toxic arrogance become the undoing of Jane's Addiction. ROBERT MILLER Anaheim
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2008 | RANDY LEWIS
The soundtrack for "Twilight," the film based on Stephenie Meyer's vampire book series, sank its teeth into the top of the national sales chart, debuting at No. 1 Wednesday after selling 165,000 copies during its first week of release. The album, which includes songs by Linkin Park, Perry Farrell, Paramore, Muse and other rock acts, hit stores in advance of the Nov. 21 general release date for the movie. It kept AC/DC's "Black Ice" from logging a third consecutive week at No. 1. "Black Ice" dropped to No. 2 with sales of 160,000 copies.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
This post has been updated. See note below for details. After two sold-out performances last week in New York, the L.A. edition of Stones Fest, a musical salute to the Rolling Stones that benefits the Sweet Relief  Musicians Fund, will bring Michelle Branch, Matt Sorum, Juliette Lewis and a host of other musicians to the Fonda Theatre in Hollywood on Thursday, May 30. The talent roster for the show also includes Butch Walker, Chuck Prophet,...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The most poignant image of the beautiful but infinitely sad "Gift" (at the Sunset 5, Fridays and Saturdays at midnight) is that of a glowing, striking-looking bridal couple standing in a field. Both are young, with dark hair and strong profiles. Both are dressed with lacy, spangled elegance, and they look endlessly blissful.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1992 | Steve Hochman
Fans of Perry Farrell--which include the writers at Rolling Stone and Spin magazines who named him artist of the year for 1991--have been hanging in suspense for months since the mysterious performer officially announced that he'd broken up his band, Jane's Addiction. Though Farrell had previously talked about leaving music for good, he assured the world that he'd be back with a new musical venture, but gave no clues as to what or when. Until now.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1996 | SARA SCRIBNER
Perry Farrell is the consummate master of ceremonies, the ringleader for the circus of the eclectic. His previous band, Jane's Addiction, embraced Led Zeppelin and X, folk art and tribal culture and made it appeal to football captains and art-house denizens alike. And Farrell gave indie and alternative groups a stadium stage with his brainchild, the concert/happening Lollapalooza.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1990 | JONATHAN GOLD
As film buffs await the newest from Kubrick and lit buffs the latest from Mailer, certain underground-rock fans look forward to a new release from Jane's Addiction--one of the very few groups capable of recording the Great American Album. And just as surely are they disappointed when it falls short. After all, it's the very unapproachability of the Big One that makes it such a tantalizing ideal. And Jane's, who toy artily with the boundaries of rock but also play riffs Jimmy Page would have given his whammy bar to have written, somehow record very good albums while they try. They mean it, man. So where Stephen Perkins may be the most powerful, rhythmically inventive drummer in rock 'n' roll, he was completely buried in the mix on Jane's' debut, "Nothing's Shocking."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1996 | Steve Hochman
Perry Farrell wants out of Lollapalooza. The unpredictable rock musician has long felt alienated by some of the directions taken recently in the traveling rock festival that he co-conceived both as a forum for new music and as a platform for social issues and technological innovations. According to various sources close to the situation, Farrell is planning to break away from it and explore the possibility of launching his own new event.
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