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Personal Appearance

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 1996 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Spunky Nancy Drew might faint with fright--golden locks flying, high heels twisting, pearls askew--if she knew what was to befall her flapper girl self: The '90s Nancy is a university journalism major who drives a Mustang, colors her hair and thinks way too much about boys. "They have changed Nancy Drew in a frightening way," sniffed Beth Caswell, the 40ish founder of the Nancy Drew Detective Club, "taking away her manners, her roadster, her white gloves."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 1998 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Every month, after Judyth Hurst paid her bills, she was left with three tens and a five. "Thirty-five dollars. What can you do with it?" asked the 87-year-old retired bookkeeper and insurance saleswoman living on a fixed income. "If I got more money, I could do some of the things I wanted to do." With even a little extra cash, Hurst said, she could buy lipstick, face powder or get her hair permed at the salon. So Hurst called her assemblyman.
BUSINESS
February 24, 1996 | KATHY M. KRISTOF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first wave of the massive baby boom generation has turned 50. And many boomers apparently don't like what they see in the mirror. Cosmetic surgeries that make people look younger or thinner are enjoying a surge in popularity, in part because of vanity but also because the procedures have become more affordable.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1992 | Michael Flagg, Times staff writer
Your average high school student from a poor family may not even own clothes decent enough to apply for a job in. So YES--the Youth Employment Service in Costa Mesa--is asking local businesses for gift certificates so needy youths can get a haircut or a pair of new shoes before they go out on a job interview. YES is a private, nonprofit group run by two part-time staffers. Last year, it says, it helped 584 youths between the ages of 14 and 22 find jobs.
NEWS
September 8, 1999 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yuriza Madariaga knew exactly how she wanted to wear her long, dark hair for her wedding: off her face in an elegant upswept style. But as she saw it, there were two obstacles to the hairstyle of her dreams--her ears. Ever since age 12, she says, she'd been so self-conscious about her protruding ears that she carefully covered them with her hair.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2002 | Geoff Boucher
In 1965, the talk of the Newport Folk Festival was Bob Dylan plugging in. In 2002, the crowd conversation was about the rock troubadour wigging out. The 1960s icon inspired head-scratching and studied speculation among his fans on Saturday when he made a triumphant return to the famous festival in a get-up that seemed like one of Dana Carvey's castoffs from "The Master of Disguise." The western wear and white cowboy hat were fine, but what was up with the long, stringy wig and fake beard?
BUSINESS
April 23, 1995 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When your boss starts talking layoffs and a major job hunt looms, don't groan. Groom. Instead of gnashing your teeth, polish them. Instead of gnawing your nails, manicure them. Instead of pulling your hair, perm it. With so many good people prowling for so few good jobs, image matters more than ever these days. It's dress for success in the extreme--you need the right socks, the right shoes, even the right umbrella to make it. Or so the image industry contends.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1996 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
You are sitting in a jury box in downtown Los Angeles and in walks a handcuffed prisoner, slouching toward his lawyer's table wearing his prison blues. It's the same freeze-frame snatched from thousands of courtrooms across the country. But take that same prisoner and deck him out in a nicely dry-cleaned three-piece suit and he looks less like a criminal.
NEWS
May 25, 1992 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Starting this week, this quiet university beach town promises to give a little extra protection to ugly people. Same for fat people, skinny people, short people, tall people, scarred people, toothless people or anyone else with physical characteristics that might make them a target of discrimination.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 1999 | MILES CORWIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A black Los Angeles police lieutenant who claims he has been denied a promotion because he wears a beard filed a civil rights lawsuit Wednesday against the city and Chief Bernard C. Parks. The LAPD bans uniformed officers from wearing beards, but Lt. Kevin H. Williams has a medical exemption from that policy because he suffers chronic skin irritations and infections as a result of daily shaving.
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