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Personal Assistants

NEWS
June 30, 1995 | SCOTT SHIBUYA BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a veteran provider of the city's most quintessential service, Ron Holder is used to getting the best perks. He has flown the Concorde, trod the red carpet at film premieres and been up close and personal at the Oscars (third row center, right behind Tom Hanks). He has lazed on movie sets, toured first class throughout Australia and New Zealand, and sat around a piano belting out show tunes with Liza Minnelli.
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NEWS
April 4, 1995 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We may never know what the jurors in the O.J. Simpson trial think of prosecution witness Brian (Kato) Kaelin. But as far as Hollywood is concerned, the verdict is already in: He's hot . . . this minute. The 36-year-old, Z-movie bit-player (who can forget him in "Hail Caesar"?) and celebrity "house guest" has become a household word. In fact, personal assistants--the "gofers" who cater to the stars' every need and whim--are now, thanks to Kaelin, known as "Katos."
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | DAVID EHRENSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
We may never know what the jurors in the O.J. Simpson trial think of prosecution witness Brian (Kato) Kaelin. But as far as Hollywood is concerned, the verdict is already in: He's hot . . . this minute. The 36-year-old, Z-movie bit-player (who can forget him in "Hail Caesar"?) and celebrity "house guest" has become a household word. In fact, personal assistants--the gofers who cater to the stars' every need and whim--are now, thanks to Kaelin, known as "Katos."
BUSINESS
March 22, 1995 | DANIEL AKST, Daniel Akst, a Los Angeles writer, is a former assistant business editor for technology at The Times
Information about personal finance abounds in cyberspace. It's all over CompuServe, America Online and Prodigy. But many on-line denizens don't realize the extent to which it's busting out on the Internet as well. The other day, for instance, I was wondering whether closed-end municipal bond funds might still be a good deal, so I posted that question to misc.invest.funds.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1995 | Michael Walker, Michael Walker is a frequent contributor to Calendar
'Hot, young, gifted, undiscovered writer from NYC," read the ad in Daily Variety's Situations Wanted classifieds. "Type 65 WPM. Organizational wizard. Never heard of 'sexual harassment.' If you are a successful filmmaker, I want to be your assistant." Pamela Francis, a 27-year-old New Yorker transplanted to L.A., placed this ad because, she says, "one of the swiftest ways to climb up (in the industry) is to be an assistant."
BUSINESS
May 29, 1992 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hoping to play midwife at the birth of what is touted as a $3.5-trillion "mega-industry," Apple Computer today will preview its first "personal digital assistant," a hand-held, pen-operated computer that functions like an intelligent note pad. Code-named Newton, the videocassette-sized device will transform a handwritten message into neat block letters and carry out simple instructions.
NEWS
September 16, 1991 | JAMES TROESH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The other day, a friend asked a question I'd never been asked before: "What's it like to have attendants?" She was referring to those people who spend 24 hours a day, seven days a week with me. The men and women who have accompanied me through every crisis, every celebration, every happy, sad or indifferent time for the 20 years since I was paralyzed in a fall. The one thing an attendant is not is a gorilla in a white coat who wheels sick people around.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | RONALD J. OSTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, attempting to shield his closest personal aide, helped conceal the fact that the aide flunked a lie detector test during a highly sensitive Justice Department investigation, the agency's departing No. 2 official charged Saturday. Thornburgh also sought to keep the probe out of the hands of the department's internal watchdog unit, and, failing that, refused to follow the unit's recommendations for further investigation, Deputy Atty. Gen. Donald B.
NEWS
August 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Rep. Barney Frank said today he hired a male prostitute as a personal employee but fired him two years ago when he became suspicious the man was selling sex from Frank's Capitol Hill apartment. "I was victimized," Frank said in a telephone interview. "I knew he had been a prostitute. . . . I was trying to get him to stop. I didn't know he was expanding his business.
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