Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPersonal Communications Services
IN THE NEWS

Personal Communications Services

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
September 24, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a dramatic about-face, the Federal Communications Commission on Thursday set the stage for all-out competition between big companies and budding entrepreneurs seeking to launch a new generation of sophisticated wireless communications. In a 2-1 vote, the FCC allocated four times as much airwave space for wireless "personal communications services" as it originally allocated to the cellular industry 15 years ago.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 25, 2000 | Associated Press
If you think it's bad having to listen to someone's annoying cell phone conversations while dining out, just wait until you have to put up with them talking into their watch or hand-held computer. That time is coming sooner than you think, as electronics companies increasingly bet that anywhere you go, from any place--and almost any device--you'll want to be connected with other people.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 9, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Resolving a fractious debate, the Federal Communications Commission plans to approve a measure today aimed at speeding the introduction of always-in-touch-communications by slashing the cost of an advanced new wireless network. The plan will also reduce the complexity of "personal communications services" equipment, allowing engineers to design slightly smaller and cheaper portable devices for users to make phone calls and send and receive faxes and other information while on the run.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1997 | JUBE SHIVER JR.
A closely watched battle over the future of wireless paging is unfolding as providers tout two very different approaches to using the airwaves. In one corner, the nation's largest paging company, Paging Network Inc. of Plano, Texas, has launched a $10- to $15-a-month voice-messaging service called VoiceNow. VoiceNow eschews the interactive capability of its communications network, instead utilizing a pager that operates much like an answering machine.
BUSINESS
June 25, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Federal Communications Commission on Thursday set aside airwaves for an eagerly awaited new service that will provide wireless data communications through devices that could eventually be as portable and unobtrusive as a wristwatch. The unanimous FCC vote to launch "personal communications services," or PCS, within the next 12 months is an important step toward a go-anywhere system of telecommunications in which users would have a single number they would carry with them wherever they go.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
FCC Revises Minority Preference Rules for Spectrum Auction: The Federal Communications Commission added Native American tribes and Alaskan regional or village corporations to the groups eligible to bid on specially designated licenses for a new wireless communications technology called broad band personal communications services. The agency also raised limits on the amount of gross revenue, total assets and personal net worth that investors may bring to bidding groups.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bids Exceed $1.2 Billion in Wireless Auction: Small businesses hoping to win licenses to provide cellular telephone and other wireless services have offered bids totaling more than $1.2 billion after four rounds of the government auction. The Federal Communications Commission said its auction of personal communications services licenses recessed Thursday for the holidays and will resume the first week in January. Proceeds from the auction of the 493 PCS licenses will go directly to the Treasury.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1993 | From Bloomberg Business News
The Federal Communications Commission's decision to allocate so-called pioneer preference spectrum licenses for personal communications services (PCS) sets the stage for some intense bidding at a federal auction of the PCS wireless spectrum next spring. And the bidding will be crucial for such firms as California regional phone company Pacific Telesis. Last week, the FCC gave early Christmas gifts to American Personal Communications, Cox Enterprises Inc. and Omnipoint Communications Inc.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cadre of companies that are selling an array of wireless phone services make much of the distinction between digital cellular networks and a newer breed of products known as personal communications services, or PCS. But they certainly don't have to. "They both use the same technology, and the systems are built very much the same," said Mark Lowenstein, vice president of wireless research at Yankee Group, a Boston-based market research firm.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1996 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soon, a tree will grow in Mission Viejo unlike any other tree. It will have branches and needles and will blend in with the other pine trees at Mission Viejo Church of Christ on Felipe Road and Marguerite Parkway. But unlike its organic cousins, this 40-foot evergreen has a metal trunk and will receive digital electronic signals used by thousands of mobile phone owners.
BUSINESS
August 12, 1996 | Amy Harmon
Bob Dole has one. Newt Gingrich has one. Jack Kemp got one yesterday. Several members of the Secret Service are wielding them, and San Diego Mayor Susan Golding used hers to welcome the 499 other privileged users of a new kind of wireless telephone to the Republican National Convention here Sunday morning. This week marks California's introduction to the technology, known as PCS for personal communications services.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1996 | KAREN KAPLAN and JENNIFER OLDHAM
While nearly everyone agrees that a combination of old and new technologies will deliver a plethora of advanced services, each player has its own plan to do it. A look at the technologies competing to serve up everything from interactive television to two-way paging, and which companies are backing them: Cellular The most popular form of wireless calling involves dividing a region into cells, each served by its own antenna.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1996 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Jube Shiver Jr., who covers telecommunications from The Times' Washington bureau, can be reached via e-mail at Jube.Shiver@latimes.com
Providers of personal communications services, once heralded as pioneers of the ultimate form of mobile communications, are running into so much interference that many of them are having trouble getting their ventures off the ground. Even as the final phase of bidding for the parts of the radio spectrum reserved for PCS reaches stratospheric levels, some previous winners of the coveted wireless communications licenses are beginning to wonder if they will ever see a return on their investment.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bids Exceed $1.2 Billion in Wireless Auction: Small businesses hoping to win licenses to provide cellular telephone and other wireless services have offered bids totaling more than $1.2 billion after four rounds of the government auction. The Federal Communications Commission said its auction of personal communications services licenses recessed Thursday for the holidays and will resume the first week in January. Proceeds from the auction of the 493 PCS licenses will go directly to the Treasury.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1995 | From Reuters
Motorola Inc. announced a key order Monday from GTE Corp. to supply equipment for a personal communications services network, positioning itself for a top role in digital wireless communications. Personal communications services (PCS) allow a much broader range of communications than mobile cellular networks, such as two-way paging, electronic mail, clearer sound and more reliable connections.
BUSINESS
September 3, 1995 | MATTHEW FORDAHL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
An emerging generation of wireless phones, pagers and other communicators appears likely to get stuck in technical trouble. Personal communications services, known as PCS, are often touted as working throughout the United States and the world. But manufacturers and network providers are choosing transmission methods that aren't always compatible, creating a patchwork quilt of signal.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|