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NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Reuters
The Pentagon said Thursday it was reviewing classified material that former CIA Director John M. Deutch had on a non-secure home computer and will seek to answer the question, "How did this happen?" Neither the CIA nor the Pentagon have any evidence that any of the classified material was obtained by an outsider, but both agencies are conducting separate reviews of what might have been compromised if someone had obtained the secret information. Pentagon spokesman Rear Adm.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 1998 | From Bloomberg News
International Business Machines Corp., the world's largest computer maker, agreed to feature software from No. 1 online service America Online Inc. on its personal computers for consumers, the companies said Tuesday. The software, which will be installed on IBM's Aptiva and ThinkPad models, will let IBM users click on an icon to sign up for AOL's online service, which includes Internet access.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1993 | Dean Takahashi / Times staff writer
For years, Yamaha Corp. was content to be known as a maker of motorcycles, pianos, guitars, keyboards and other musical equipment. But now the Japanese company's Yamaha Corp. of America subsidiary in Buena Park wants everyone to know that it has the know-how to blend music and personal computers. Since 1973, the company has manufactured semiconductor chips for its musical instruments. Since 1986, it has become a leading producer of chips that enhance the sound of PCs.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1995
This holiday season as never before, in department stores and office supply stores, especially computer stores and electronics stores, shoppers will be eyeing personal computers. But buying the right PC and getting it to work properly is no easy feat. Computers are still expensive and complicated devices that are far more difficult to operate than almost anything else you might buy for your home.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | DOUGLAS JEHL, Times Staff Writer
Urging that defenses against terrorism be made more vigilant, Transportation Secretary Samuel K. Skinner proposed Wednesday that an international aviation body launch a review that ultimately could prohibit passengers from carrying portable computers and radios aboard commercial airplanes. Skinner asked the International Civil Aviations Organization to assess the "problems" posed by allowing such electronic devices on board aircraft.
BUSINESS
May 31, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Last month, after about a year of shopping around, Bear, Stearns stockbroker John Gulish bought himself a personal computer to analyze stock and commodities markets. "It is like the Model T Ford," Gulish says. "When prices fall to an affordable level, people buy." Do they ever. Within weeks of Gulish's purchase, colleagues found his IBM PC-AT clone so useful--and priced so reasonably--that "five or six guys in my office ordered their own systems."
NEWS
September 12, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
A harmful but rare computer virus is set to attack IBM-compatible personal computers after Oct. 12, experts in computer security said today. The virus cripples personal computers' hard disks, where programs and data are stored, by wiping out the directory sections known as the partition table and file allocation table. "It's like taking away the index from the library," said John McAfee, chairman of the Computer Virus Industry Assn. in Santa Clara, Calif.
BUSINESS
September 10, 1988 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
AST Research Inc., an Irvine personal computer maker that has been trying to establish a major presence in the Chinese market, may finally have achieved its breakthrough. The company said Friday that it has finalized a $10-million deal with the Chinese government to export more than 3,000 personal computers to China. The deal is believed to be the largest single computer sale to China by an Orange County company.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1986 | JAMES BATES, Times Staff Writer
Something must be up with Jugi Tandon. He hasn't bought a car in three months. For a man who collects automobiles like some people collect stamps, that's a good indication that lately his mind has been on much more than his cars, of which he has about a dozen.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1988 | David Olmos, Times staff writer
An industrywide shortage of memory chips used in personal computers and work stations continues to plague some Orange County high-tech firms. One bright spot in the situation is that chip prices, which early this year were zooming upward, have begun to stabilize. "The supply situation continues to be very tight," said John S. Cain, chief financial officer of Alpha Microsystems, a Santa Ana computer company.
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