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NEWS
February 14, 1992
Tim Rutten's essay on "The Moral Dilemma of Censorship" concludes by saying, "Like the confused young mother in the video store, we are all condemned to freedom." But freedom is only real when we truly have a choice. Like that young immigrant mother, I also ponder the choices in the video store and at the local multiplex. Where are the movies I want to see? Where's the romance? The clever dialogue? The intrigue, rather than blood and gore? What kind of freedom is it when the choice is either "Men With Large Revolvers Who Drive Like Crazy People" or "Neurotic Women With Large Breasts"?
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WORLD
January 13, 2014 | Laura King
In the labyrinthine alleyways of this ancient city's Grand Bazaar, currency dealer Sardar Kaya glanced around before making an impromptu confession: Even those like him, who daily turn volatility into profit, wonder if Turkey's biggest corruption scandal in recent memory has become too jarring a ride. "Sure, a crisis like this is good for business, if you are clever enough," he said, lounging against a column in the sprawling market's informal gold-and-currency trading district, where chaotic scenes unfolded last week as the Turkish lira touched an all-time low. "But you can also fall on the wrong side of it. " Many in Turkey are feeling the same way as they try to sort through the implications of a vast and many-tentacled graft inquiry that has jeopardized Turkey's once-thriving economy and shaken the foundations of state control -- most particularly, the near-absolute power that Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan has enjoyed for more than a decade.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993
I am amazed that a panel of appeals court justices would advise (Orange) County attorneys to settle the multimillion-dollar suit against the county for the mauling of Laura Small at Caspers Wilderness Park. Does Associate Justice Henry T. Moore Jr. think that attorneys who have worked on this case for seven years have not considered the possibility that the county might "lose a great deal" in an appeals court decision? Ask the city of Newport Beach about the benefits of caving in to personal liability suits.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The United Nations created the International Day of Happiness , which is celebrated Wednesday (today), to recognize "the relevance of happiness and well-being as universal goals and aspirations in the lives of human beings around the world... " It's a different way of evaluating nations apart from their economic wealth. With that in mind, I thought about a report last year from the London-based think tank Legatum Group that ranked 142 countries and came up with a Prosperity Index.
NEWS
April 29, 1994 | JANICE ARKATOV, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Janice Arkatov writes regularly about theater for The Times
Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water . . . . Pirates are on the prowl again in Mark Lee's "Pirates"--opening tonight at the Road Theatre--the parallel stories of a contemporary history teacher and her 18th-Century counterpart, real-life adventurer Anne Bonney. "It's about how we disguise ourselves in everyday life," explains the playwright, 42. "In the 18th Century, women had to disguise themselves as men to get what they wanted.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
I would like to congratulate The Times on this article promoting immorality, impurity and anti-Catholic opinion. If the aim of The Times is to undermine society and religion this article goes a long way toward that end. Does The Times wish to exult such transgressions of the natural and moral order and put them forward as the acquisition of a human value and a new way of exercising one's own personal freedom? ROBERT BRANCH Hawthorne
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1989
I am compelled to respond to a letter written by Kate McFadden (Sept. 22). Although I agree with her conclusion that the abortion issue is a reflection of the much deeper issue of restricted personal freedom, I find that her arguments reaching that conclusion are both logically and philosophically flawed. Ms. McFadden seems to believe that governmental funding of health care and the arts is an enhancement to freedom while governmental curtailment of personal action is restrictive to freedom.
OPINION
May 10, 2003
Rarely can you find a more wrongheaded column than Ronald Brownstein's "A Clash of Personal Freedom and Common Good" (May 5). He writes: "Bush's tax cuts, for instance, put more income back in individual pockets, but at the price of eviscerating government revenues that support activities society can undertake only collectively -- from providing a social safety net to building roads and schools." President Bush's tax cut for fiscal 2004 is about $80 billion; his budget is $2,230 billion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2000
Re "Why Republicans Are Such Ripe Targets," Commentary, July 14: As one of the Republicans whom Elizabeth Whelan fairly described as having legitimate reasons for being against government actions against tobacco companies, I have to be consistent in my ideology. She says that I should be criticized for not having a program of my own to deal with the health devastation of tobacco use in the United States. I do have a program. I quit smoking 27 years ago. That's my program. It's free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1989
As a Chinese student studying here, I am greatly disturbed by the incident of Prof. Fang Lizhi, the prominent Chinese dissident astrophysicist, being blocked by the Chinese police from attending President George Bush's banquet on his invitation (Part I, Feb. 27; editorial, "The Missing Guest," Feb. 28). The obviously politically motivated obstruction not only violates Prof. Fang's basic human rights, it may also alarm and alienate many Chinese students here. Largely identified with Fang's honest and outspoken ideas, hundreds and thousands of them have signed letters to support him. Now his humiliation clearly sends a chilling signal to those of us who plan to return that political freedom and tolerance are still very limited there.
NATIONAL
August 8, 2005 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
As subway riders poured into Pennsylvania Station, a police officer stopped Ahmed Mohammed and asked him to open his backpack. The Pakistani-born engineer, who was visiting New York with his family, shrugged and agreed to the search. He looked embarrassed as the officer quickly examined its contents -- T-shirts and presents purchased at Macy's -- and waved him through the turnstile. Heading for the rush-hour train, Mohammed was angry.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2004 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
The corporate mega-giants that have mushroomed in today's hothouse climate of deregulation, mergers, takeovers, bailouts and globalism may not yet have attained the absolute power famed for corrupting absolutely, but they seem well on the way to doing so. By 1999, according to a survey cited in Jamie Court's eye-opening "Corporateering," "fifty-one of the largest 100 economies in the world were corporations."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2004 | Jean-Paul Renaud, Times Staff Writer
A move to ban alcohol from San Diego's beaches on the Fourth of July has sparked fierce debates in three coastal communities and revived arguments over personal freedoms and public safety. Many residents of Sail Bay -- an affluent San Diego community at the western edge of Mission Bay -- say their section of the beach is marred by violence, littering and indecency every Fourth of July holiday, and they blame the heavy use of alcohol.
BOOKS
September 21, 2003 | John W. Dean, John W. Dean is a former Nixon White House counsel, a Findlaw.com columnist and the author of several books, including a forthcoming biography of Warren G. Harding.
If you don't believe that America's war on terrorism threatens your freedoms, delving into any one of these books will change your mind as well as advise you of the rights and liberties that are in true jeopardy. This collection of new works, which address the effect of the war on terrorism on civil liberties, contains one remarkably consistent theme: The federal government has overreacted to the terrorism threat and, in doing so, has traded freedoms of all Americans for an illusion of security.
OPINION
May 10, 2003
Rarely can you find a more wrongheaded column than Ronald Brownstein's "A Clash of Personal Freedom and Common Good" (May 5). He writes: "Bush's tax cuts, for instance, put more income back in individual pockets, but at the price of eviscerating government revenues that support activities society can undertake only collectively -- from providing a social safety net to building roads and schools." President Bush's tax cut for fiscal 2004 is about $80 billion; his budget is $2,230 billion.
NATIONAL
May 5, 2003 | Ronald Brownstein
Robert Kagan, the provocative neoconservative foreign policy thinker, would have been in paradise had he wandered past the Centro de Arte Reina Sofia museum here a few days ago. In his celebrated new book, "Of Paradise and Power," Kagan argues that a split between Europe and the United States over war in Iraq was inevitable because Europe's military weakness has encouraged it to favor law and negotiation over force -- paradise over power -- to resolve conflicts between nations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1987
In the Popping Off column in the March 15 Calendar, Kristine McKenna aired her negative views on the Bruce Springsteen phenomenon. Here's a sample of the heavy reader response, which ran roughly 60% to 40% against McKenna's opinion. What makes this country great is that everyone is entitled to an opinion and, therefore, I am not upset about what McKenna has to say about Bruce Springsteen. I can only pity her. What he has done through his records and concerts cannot be tarnished by any one writer or critic . . . even in a publication with the prestige of the Los Angeles Times.
NEWS
March 20, 2013 | By Mary Forgione, Los Angeles Times Daily Travel & Deal blogger
The United Nations created the International Day of Happiness , which is celebrated Wednesday (today), to recognize "the relevance of happiness and well-being as universal goals and aspirations in the lives of human beings around the world... " It's a different way of evaluating nations apart from their economic wealth. With that in mind, I thought about a report last year from the London-based think tank Legatum Group that ranked 142 countries and came up with a Prosperity Index.
NEWS
December 22, 2002
Re "Is a Law Unjust? One State May Allow Juries to Decide," Oct. 30: Your article regarding the "jury nullification" amendment in South Dakota points to the increasing frustration felt by citizens, including this reader, with the criminal justice system and the enforcement methods of the police and courts. Here in Huntington Beach, the police are well known for their aggressive enforcement of such innocuous "crimes" as street sweeping violations, motor vehicle violations (keeps the riff-raff out of town)
MAGAZINE
January 13, 2002 | SCOTT HARRIS, Scott Harris last wrote for the magazine for the December 1999 millennium issue
We're bombing Afghanistan, anthrax is in the mail, and all across America it looks like Stars and Stripes forever. It is the evening of Oct. 11, one month into the war on terrorism, and Congress is cooking up something that will be called the USA Patriot Act. This sweeping law includes a dramatic expansion of Internet surveillance, unprecedented sharing of information between government agencies, stiffer penalties for computer crimes and greater power to detain noncitizens.
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