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Personally Identifiable Information

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NEWS
November 16, 2000
Aggregate information: Information that may be collected by a Web site but is not personally identifiable (see definition below) to you. Includes demographic data, domain names, Internet provider addresses and Web site traffic. Bot: Short for "robot," also known as a shopping agent, shopping bot, shopbot, etc. A program or Web site that searches several sites for information for the user, such as finding the lowest price on something you want to buy.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The state of California has fired the opening shot in its fight to get mobile apps to comply with state privacy laws. California Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris filed a suit against Delta Air Lines over its Fly Delta mobile app. The app allows Delta fliers to check into flights, pay for checked baggage and access their frequent flier accounts with the airline. But the suit alleges that Delta has not provided a privacy policy for its standalone app, which gathers information such as a traveler's full name, billing and home addresses, date of birth and credit card information.
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BUSINESS
October 12, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris put United Airlines on notice Friday via Twitter. @KamalaHarris rebuked the airline for not displaying a privacy policy on its mobile app. “Fabulous app, @United Airlines, but where is your app's #privacy policy?” she wrote . She also linked to California's Online Privacy Protection Act , which requires commercial websites to conspicuously post a privacy policy if they collect personally identifiable information from Californians.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2012 | By Jessica Guynn
California Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris put United Airlines on notice Friday via Twitter. @KamalaHarris rebuked the airline for not displaying a privacy policy on its mobile app. “Fabulous app, @United Airlines, but where is your app's #privacy policy?” she wrote . She also linked to California's Online Privacy Protection Act , which requires commercial websites to conspicuously post a privacy policy if they collect personally identifiable information from Californians.
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Jon Healey
This is a bit of an eye-opener: the Obama administration threatened Wednesday to veto HR 3523, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, because of concerns about the bill's impact on privacy. Sponsored by the top Republican and Democrat on the House Intelligence committee, CISPA would let federal agents share classified information about hackers with Internet service providers, utilities and online networks. More controversially, it would also encourage online services to share information about cyber threats with the federal government.
OPINION
September 26, 2007
Is your privacy threatened if your cellphone monitors your movements but doesn't record them? What if a computer listens in on your conversations but doesn't tell a human what you said? These are the kinds of questions raised by an emerging group of services that sell the information new technologies collect about the people who use them. For example, some businesses want to tell advertisers the location of participating cellphone users.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Trade Commission has agreed on a settlement with Twitter resulting from the site's alleged "serious lapses" in data security that allowed hackers to take over Twitter twice in 2009, accessing users' private information and hijacking accounts to send out phony tweets. According to an FTC statement, the settlement "resolved charges that Twitter deceived consumers and put their privacy at risk by failing to safeguard their personal information. " Twitter, which was about 2 years old at the time of the incidents, was a young site that often struggled under the weight of its fast-growing traffic and server demands.
BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Christine Mai-Duc
The state of California has fired the opening shot in its fight to get mobile apps to comply with state privacy laws. California Atty. Gen. Kamala D. Harris filed a suit against Delta Air Lines over its Fly Delta mobile app. The app allows Delta fliers to check into flights, pay for checked baggage and access their frequent flier accounts with the airline. But the suit alleges that Delta has not provided a privacy policy for its standalone app, which gathers information such as a traveler's full name, billing and home addresses, date of birth and credit card information.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | David Lazarus
Who owns your personal information - you or the business you share it with? It's a fundamental question that gets to the heart of whether existing privacy protections are too strict or not strict enough. It also addresses matters of accountability when data go astray, as was the case this week when a major credit card processing company said as many as 1.5 million card numbers may have been stolen by hackers. I wrote on Tuesday about the lack of adequate disclosure rules when people's privacy is violated.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Remember that Myspace profile you created oh so many years ago that you've likely neglected? As it turns out the Federal Trade Commission took Myspace to task saying the social networking site exposed your personally identifiable information to advertisers when it had promised to protect it. Now, they've come to an agreement under which Myspace is barred from any other privacy misrepresentations and it must submit to regular privacy assessments over...
SCIENCE
September 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Finally, scientists have documented that spending time on Facebook isn't all about posting pictures of cute kids and running virtual farms - it can actually be useful to American society. A single election day message, sent to more than 60 million users of the social networking site, increased turnout in the November 2010 congressional election by 340,000 votes, researchers reported Wednesday. It may not sound like much, but in a close election - such as Florida's contested presidential vote in 2000 - that kind of bump could make the difference between a win and a loss, said UC San Diego social network researcher James Fowler, leader of the unusual experiment.
BUSINESS
May 8, 2012 | By Michelle Maltais
Remember that Myspace profile you created oh so many years ago that you've likely neglected? As it turns out the Federal Trade Commission took Myspace to task saying the social networking site exposed your personally identifiable information to advertisers when it had promised to protect it. Now, they've come to an agreement under which Myspace is barred from any other privacy misrepresentations and it must submit to regular privacy assessments over...
NEWS
April 25, 2012 | By Jon Healey
This is a bit of an eye-opener: the Obama administration threatened Wednesday to veto HR 3523, the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act, because of concerns about the bill's impact on privacy. Sponsored by the top Republican and Democrat on the House Intelligence committee, CISPA would let federal agents share classified information about hackers with Internet service providers, utilities and online networks. More controversially, it would also encourage online services to share information about cyber threats with the federal government.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Activists and lawmakers are geared up for a final push against the latest Internet security legislation, calling on Congress to reject or dial back the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) because of the considerable power it would give government to examine Americans' online activities. A number of amendments already have been made to the bill as its supporters have tried to secure passage - - a vote is likely on Friday - - by clearing up ambiguities regarding what the law would allow the government to do. CISPA's supporters portray it as a bill focused on opening up communication between the government and private entities for the purposes of sharing information about imminent or emerging cyber security threats, with particular emphasis on those that threaten national security from foreign sources.
NEWS
April 16, 2012 | By Morgan Little
As the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act of 2011 nears its time in the congressional spotlight, supporters and detractors alike are fine-tuning their arguments in preparation for another battle over how the Internet will be influenced by federal legislation. The core objective of CISPA is simple: Opening up greater means for communication between private entities and the federal government on issues of cybersecurity and national security. “Today the U.S. government protects itself using classified and unclassified threat information that it identifies from attacks on its networks,” a staffer on the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence said, introducing the legislation on a conference call April 10. “However, the majority of the private sector doesn't get access to this information because the government has no mechanism today for effectively sharing.” The points of contention reside within the details of the bill.
BUSINESS
April 6, 2012 | David Lazarus
Who owns your personal information - you or the business you share it with? It's a fundamental question that gets to the heart of whether existing privacy protections are too strict or not strict enough. It also addresses matters of accountability when data go astray, as was the case this week when a major credit card processing company said as many as 1.5 million card numbers may have been stolen by hackers. I wrote on Tuesday about the lack of adequate disclosure rules when people's privacy is violated.
SCIENCE
September 13, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Finally, scientists have documented that spending time on Facebook isn't all about posting pictures of cute kids and running virtual farms - it can actually be useful to American society. A single election day message, sent to more than 60 million users of the social networking site, increased turnout in the November 2010 congressional election by 340,000 votes, researchers reported Wednesday. It may not sound like much, but in a close election - such as Florida's contested presidential vote in 2000 - that kind of bump could make the difference between a win and a loss, said UC San Diego social network researcher James Fowler, leader of the unusual experiment.
NEWS
April 24, 2012 | By Morgan Little
WASHINGTON -- Activists and lawmakers are geared up for a final push against the latest Internet security legislation, calling on Congress to reject or dial back the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (PDF) because of the considerable power it would give government to examine Americans' online activities. A number of amendments already have been made to the bill as its supporters have tried to secure passage - - a vote is likely on Friday - - by clearing up ambiguities regarding what the law would allow the government to do. CISPA's supporters portray it as a bill focused on opening up communication between the government and private entities for the purposes of sharing information about imminent or emerging cyber security threats, with particular emphasis on those that threaten national security from foreign sources.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
The Federal Trade Commission has agreed on a settlement with Twitter resulting from the site's alleged "serious lapses" in data security that allowed hackers to take over Twitter twice in 2009, accessing users' private information and hijacking accounts to send out phony tweets. According to an FTC statement, the settlement "resolved charges that Twitter deceived consumers and put their privacy at risk by failing to safeguard their personal information. " Twitter, which was about 2 years old at the time of the incidents, was a young site that often struggled under the weight of its fast-growing traffic and server demands.
OPINION
September 26, 2007
Is your privacy threatened if your cellphone monitors your movements but doesn't record them? What if a computer listens in on your conversations but doesn't tell a human what you said? These are the kinds of questions raised by an emerging group of services that sell the information new technologies collect about the people who use them. For example, some businesses want to tell advertisers the location of participating cellphone users.
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