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Pervez Musharraf

WORLD
November 20, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
A high court stacked with loyalists set the stage Monday for President Pervez Musharraf to resign as army chief and to lead the country as a civilian, tossing out all legal challenges to his reelection last month. Musharraf, a general who took power in a 1999 coup, is now expected to step down from his military post as early as this weekend, shedding the uniform he has called his "second skin."
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WORLD
November 18, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
A senior U.S. envoy pressed President Pervez Musharraf on Saturday to lift a harsh emergency decree and move the country toward civilian rule, but the Pakistani leader balked at setting any firm timetables despite the high-level demand from his government's main patron. Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte reported no breakthroughs in the two-hour meeting, during which he also urged Musharraf to reconcile with opposition leader Benazir Bhutto.
WORLD
November 17, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Disdained by an angry opposition, a subdued President Pervez Musharraf on Friday swore in a loyalist-led caretaker government meant to remain in place until after parliamentary elections in early January. The swearing-in of the interim administration came hours before U.S. Deputy Secretary of State John D. Negroponte arrived for what were expected to be tense and difficult talks. U.S.
WORLD
November 16, 2007 | Paul Richter and Laura King, Times Staff Writers
Fearing the collapse of a friendly government, the Bush administration has begun a concerted public effort to salvage the embattled presidency of Pakistan's Gen. Pervez Musharraf by pushing him to compromise with political opponents and abandon emergency rule, U.S. officials said Thursday. U.S.
WORLD
November 15, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
On any given day during the last eight years, President Pervez Musharraf was most likely to be found not at the ornate presidential compound in the capital, but here in this garrison city: at his desk at army headquarters, clad in familiar camouflage fatigues, greeted everywhere with the crisp salutes and studied deference accorded a four-star general. Now, a farewell to arms appears inevitable, if not imminent.
WORLD
November 14, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
The political crisis gripping this country took a surprise turn Tuesday when former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto called on President Pervez Musharraf to step down, raising the prospect of more violence between her supporters and government forces, and apparently dashing U.S. hopes for conciliation.
WORLD
November 13, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Backed by hundreds of police officers, the government placed former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto under house arrest today to prevent a protest against President Pervez Musharraf, escalating a war of nerves before a deadline later this week for Musharraf to step down as army chief. It was the second time in less than a week that the Pakistani president's biggest rival has been confined to a home.
WORLD
November 12, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
Raising the prospect of an election campaign carried out under de facto martial law, President Pervez Musharraf said Sunday that balloting for a new parliament would take place in early January, but set no date for lifting his emergency decree. Musharraf's pledge to hold elections in less than nine weeks, in adherence to the original schedule, won quick praise from the Bush administration, with Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice calling it a welcome sign.
WORLD
November 11, 2007 | Laura King, Times Staff Writer
For President Pervez Musharraf, it has been a week of living dangerously. But even as activists across Pakistan vow to step up their defiance of de facto martial law, many of those arrayed against Musharraf are beginning to believe he may just survive this crisis, at least in the short term. "We hope to prevail -- we are struggling against military dictatorship, after all," said Amina Paracha, a prominent attorney and pro-democracy activist.
WORLD
November 11, 2007 | Henry Chu, Times Staff Writer
Three British journalists have been ordered expelled from the country because their newspaper published an editorial that used a mild expletive in describing President Pervez Musharraf. The Pakistani government gave the journalists 72 hours to leave the country, Pakistan's deputy information minister, Tariq Azim, said Saturday.
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