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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A worker from Honduras testified in a Los Angeles courtroom Tuesday that he and his wife tried for a decade to have children but failed to conceive after he went to work on a banana plantation where the pesticide DBCP was used. "As a man I'm worthless," Benancio Lizandro Espinoza said with the aid of a translator when asked how he felt when he found out he was sterile. Espinoza is one of a dozen banana farm workers who are suing Dole Fresh Fruit Co. and Standard Fruit Co.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2013 | By Dan Weikel, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles County bus drivers say they are regularly becoming ill - sometimes while behind the wheel - from pesticides sprayed inside their vehicles by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. At least 14 Metro drivers are pursuing workers' compensation claims, and more than 110 have signed a petition that demands a halt to the spraying, according to their attorney. Some operators are on medical leave, and a few say they have left Metro because of repeated exposure. "You can be driving your bus and get hit with the symptoms," said Frank Portillo, a 23-year coach operator who retired in March, sooner than planned, because of medical issues he believes are pesticide related.
NEWS
March 2, 1996 | From a Times staff writer
Urging worldwide efforts to protect people from pesticides, a Washington, D.C.-based environmental research group Friday warned that agricultural chemicals used around the world are capable of damaging immune systems and increasing rates of infectious disease and cancer. The World Resources Institute said scientific studies by a variety of experts show that many children and adults exposed to pesticides have altered immune systems. The institute called for the U.N.
NEWS
October 4, 1988 | United Press International
Federal tests detect only about half the pesticides that may contaminate fruits, vegetables and other food, and regulators are relatively unconcerned, a congressional report said Monday. The Office of Technology Assessment, the bipartisan research arm of Congress, found the multi-residue methods the Food and Drug Administration uses for most screening can detect only 163 of 316 pesticides registered with the Environmental Protection Agency.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Sacramento Superior Court judge ruled that three irrigation districts can't put pesticides into their canals without analyzing the effect they would have on the environment. Environmental groups had sued the South San Joaquin, Turlock and Merced irrigation districts, charging that they applied pesticides in a way that could harm plants, fish, wildlife and groundwater. The judge asked the districts to find less harmful alternatives and to seek public comment before applying the chemicals.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | From the Washington Post
The Environmental Protection Agency Wednesday ended a 30-year ban on cancer-causing pesticides that increase in concentration when treated fruits and vegetables are processed into soups, baby foods, sauces, juices and condiments. Under a new policy, the EPA will license such pesticides for use on raw produce and in processed foods if they pose no more than a "negligible risk" of cancer, that is, increase chances of the disease by no more than one in a million.
NEWS
December 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Pesticides in runoff farm water may be a key factor in the sharp decline of striped bass in the Sacramento River, state scientists reported. Staff of the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board said in a report circulated among government agencies that they have detected levels of pesticides that are lethal or toxic to tiny animals in the striped bass food chain. The pesticides are carbofuran, ethyl parathion and malathion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2004 | From Times Staff Reports
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced Thursday that it fined two Ontario firms more than $58,000 for breaking federal pesticide rules. Cardenas Markets Inc. was fined $56,100 for the sale and distribution of two pesticides -- Cardenas Pine Cleaner and Pinol -- that were not registered with the government. Everkleen Enterprises was fined $2,381 for making Cardenas Pine Cleaner.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | From Associated Press
About 500 people were allowed to return home Wednesday after being evacuated because of burning pesticides at a nearby feed store. Several residents reported breathing problems and a few firefighters were overcome by smoke, but there were no serious injuries, a Fire Department spokesman said.
NEWS
June 7, 2000 | From the Washington Post
The Clinton administration has decided to sidestep a major political and ethical quagmire by rejecting the use of human experiments in setting regulatory limits for pesticides.
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