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BUSINESS
October 5, 1987
Pet store customers are growing older, according to Pet Supply Marketing magazine in Duluth, Minn. This reflects not only a national aging trend but also an increased interest in pets among adults, said David Kowalski, the magazine's editor. The trend is noticeable among buyers of tropical fish, he said. "We're seeing the elevation of the aquarium hobby to something that's going beyond a kid's pastime." AGES OF PET STORE CUSTOMERS 12 and under 5.71% 13-19 9.55% 20-29 24% 30-39 28.6% 40-64 22.
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OPINION
August 5, 2012
The Los Angeles City Council is expected to vote within a month on an ordinance to ban pet stores from selling dogs (as well as cats and rabbits) obtained from any supplier other than a shelter or rescue group. Though we are usually reluctant to support government-imposed constraints on what businesses can buy or sell - and we would ordinarily prefer to see the issue dealt with by tougher regulation - in this case we think the ordinance is justified. Most dogs sold at commercial pet stores across the country come from large-scale commercial breeders, many or most of which are so-called puppy mills that put profit over the well-being of their dogs, according to animal welfare advocates.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Kelly, Times Staff Writer
If the fur and feather-boa canopy beds, lemon rosemary chicken dinners and enameled jewelry on display at the Anaheim Convention Center are any indication, pets are living as well -- if not better -- than their humans. Americans shelled out nearly $30 billion on pet care last year, more than double what they spent a decade ago, boosting an industry that has shown remarkable resistance during the economic slump.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | Melissa Patterson, Chicago Tribune
The puggles, maltepoos and labradoodles scampering along city streets are bred to be cute and customizable, pet industry experts say. But these pricey "designer dogs" are also exploited by abusive breeders and unscrupulous sellers, leading to more sick puppies and unhappy owners, according to the Humane Society of the United States. Like puppy mills that produce non-hybrids, these operations are hurting the animals through neglect and poor care, the society says. Made fashionable by celebrities like Jake Gyllenhaal and Jessica Simpson, hybrid puppies -- the offspring of two purebred dogs -- often go for more money than purebreds, which can range from $200 to $2,000 per dog. Hybrid puppy breeding operations are cropping up in rural areas from Pennsylvania to Kansas, animal advocates say. But a big hot spot for hybrid owners, said pet industry insider Laura Bennett, is much closer to home.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nilo Amier massages Bag Balm into her chapped hands. Formulated 100 years ago to soften the udders of milking cows, the salve works just as well on people, said Amier, who tends a half-acre mini-ranch in Tarzana. "And it sure beats Vaseline." Canyon Country feed dealers Odie Fox and his son Jerry swear by Flex Free, a pricey supplement for easing stress and strains in horses. One dissolves a pinch of the bitter powder in his orange juice. The other sprinkles it on breakfast cereal.
OPINION
August 5, 2012
The Los Angeles City Council is expected to vote within a month on an ordinance to ban pet stores from selling dogs (as well as cats and rabbits) obtained from any supplier other than a shelter or rescue group. Though we are usually reluctant to support government-imposed constraints on what businesses can buy or sell - and we would ordinarily prefer to see the issue dealt with by tougher regulation - in this case we think the ordinance is justified. Most dogs sold at commercial pet stores across the country come from large-scale commercial breeders, many or most of which are so-called puppy mills that put profit over the well-being of their dogs, according to animal welfare advocates.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2004
Chris Simms' new restaurant's dog theme is extremely disturbing ("Hoping Diners Will Sit, Stay," Dec. 1). The pet industry knows that dog owners treat their pets as if they were children. Today's owners bathe with their dogs, eat with their dogs and sleep with their dogs. Now the Simms' dynasty has created another way for dog owners to idolize their pets: the Lazy Dog Cafe. Dog worship is out of control. Carole Wade Century City
BUSINESS
April 12, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
PetJungle.com, an Idealab e-commerce start-up, is so devoted to its core market that it recently named Norris McGovern as its co-president and chief executive. McGovern, a springer spaniel-black lab mix, is sharing the executive suite with his master, Tom McGovern, former senior vice president of Time Warner's Warner Bros. Studio Stores. That retail background will help Pasadena-based PetJungle.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
About the only time people notice light bulbs is when they blow out. Yet a trio of TV commercials for a light bulb company--including one where two men are trying to defuse a time bomb when the lights go out--not only got noticed Monday evening, they also walked off with the top award in advertising.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2007 | Leslie Earnest, Times Staff Writer
When the late billionaire Leona Helmsley left $12 million to her Maltese, Trouble, a lot of people were shocked. But maybe a lot of people weren't. Americans are pampering their pets more than ever. They treat dogs and cats as if they were human, buying them bathing suits, strollers, antidepressants and, for the neutering-conflicted, testicular implants. This is more than puppy love.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 2007 | Nardine Saad, Times Staff Writer
Eighty-five animals were seized from a Santa Ana pet shop and its owner was cited on numerous counts of animal neglect, authorities said Tuesday. Shahram Behafarin, owner of Village Pets near South Coast Plaza, was cited for operating the shop in substandard conditions without air conditioning. Temperatures in some display cages ranged from 95 to 101 degrees, with unclean water and some animals seriously injured, near death or lying in their own urine and feces, officials said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2007 | Roy Rivenburg, Times Staff Writer
A skateboarding pig, a basketball-playing bird and an albino snake are among the stars of a weekend pet expo that slithered into the Orange County Fairgrounds on Friday. About 70,000 humans are expected to attend the three-day event, which is billed as the world's largest showcase of pets and pet products.
BUSINESS
December 28, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
As Christmas approached, pet owner Jean Rask wanted to give her dogs -- a 13-year-old collie/shepherd mix named Trixie and 12-year-old Pebbles, a Chihuahua -- a special holiday gift. So she booked them two nights at a PetsHotel in Whittier operated by Phoenix-based pet-store chain PetSmart Inc. "They take good care of them," Rask said. "They have these sheepskins in their little suites, and they get clean ones every day." The hotel costs $46 a night for both dogs. Since 2000, the U.S.
MAGAZINE
March 19, 2006 | Barbara Thornburg, Barbara Thornburg is a senior editor for West.
Cleo is a typical long-legged blond. She loves to shop, so I took her one Saturday morning to the Burberry store in Beverly Hills. I called ahead to make sure she would be allowed inside, but I shouldn't have worried. When we arrived, a miniature poodle was trying on a sweater.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2005 | Sara Clarke, Times Staff Writer
As Justin Rudd talks about his Valentine's Day plans, there is an eager listener sitting nearby. Her ears perk up as she hears him spell out "b-e-a-c-h." Rudd recently completed his Valentine's card for Rosie, one of the loves of his life. It has a whimsical pink outer-space theme, and on the inside is the endearment, "You mean the world to me." Inside is a picture of her. She's a looker, though a bit wrinkly for her age. Of course, that's to be expected. Rosie is a 7-year-old English bulldog.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2004
Chris Simms' new restaurant's dog theme is extremely disturbing ("Hoping Diners Will Sit, Stay," Dec. 1). The pet industry knows that dog owners treat their pets as if they were children. Today's owners bathe with their dogs, eat with their dogs and sleep with their dogs. Now the Simms' dynasty has created another way for dog owners to idolize their pets: the Lazy Dog Cafe. Dog worship is out of control. Carole Wade Century City
WORLD
October 17, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
It is tough being an alpha wolf -- the pack leader -- as Michael McDonald knows too well. It means deciding when they eat, where they live and, sometimes, which ones have to die. When he is near, the packs at Tsitsikamma Wolf Sanctuary, near the southern coast, jump up and start circling. They know he's the top wolf, but, he says, "I irritate them. I have to take all the harsh decisions. I am always the enemy."
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