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BUSINESS
October 5, 1987
Pet store customers are growing older, according to Pet Supply Marketing magazine in Duluth, Minn. This reflects not only a national aging trend but also an increased interest in pets among adults, said David Kowalski, the magazine's editor. The trend is noticeable among buyers of tropical fish, he said. "We're seeing the elevation of the aquarium hobby to something that's going beyond a kid's pastime." AGES OF PET STORE CUSTOMERS 12 and under 5.71% 13-19 9.55% 20-29 24% 30-39 28.6% 40-64 22.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2014 | By Shan Li
Confectionary giant Mars Inc. is buying most of Procter & Gamble's pet food business for $2.9 billion, a move that will shore up the company's growing pet care business. The all-cash deal will add the Iams, Eukanuba and Natura brands in North America and Latin America to Mars' pet food lineup. Tom Lachman, the global president of Mars Petcare, said he viewed the acquisitions as “exceptionally strategic.” PHOTOS: World's most expensive cities “The deal reinforces our leadership in pet nutrition and veterinary science,” he said in a Wednesday statement.
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BUSINESS
July 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Kelly, Times Staff Writer
If the fur and feather-boa canopy beds, lemon rosemary chicken dinners and enameled jewelry on display at the Anaheim Convention Center are any indication, pets are living as well -- if not better -- than their humans. Americans shelled out nearly $30 billion on pet care last year, more than double what they spent a decade ago, boosting an industry that has shown remarkable resistance during the economic slump.
OPINION
August 5, 2012
The Los Angeles City Council is expected to vote within a month on an ordinance to ban pet stores from selling dogs (as well as cats and rabbits) obtained from any supplier other than a shelter or rescue group. Though we are usually reluctant to support government-imposed constraints on what businesses can buy or sell - and we would ordinarily prefer to see the issue dealt with by tougher regulation - in this case we think the ordinance is justified. Most dogs sold at commercial pet stores across the country come from large-scale commercial breeders, many or most of which are so-called puppy mills that put profit over the well-being of their dogs, according to animal welfare advocates.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nilo Amier massages Bag Balm into her chapped hands. Formulated 100 years ago to soften the udders of milking cows, the salve works just as well on people, said Amier, who tends a half-acre mini-ranch in Tarzana. "And it sure beats Vaseline." Canyon Country feed dealers Odie Fox and his son Jerry swear by Flex Free, a pricey supplement for easing stress and strains in horses. One dissolves a pinch of the bitter powder in his orange juice. The other sprinkles it on breakfast cereal.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2004
Chris Simms' new restaurant's dog theme is extremely disturbing ("Hoping Diners Will Sit, Stay," Dec. 1). The pet industry knows that dog owners treat their pets as if they were children. Today's owners bathe with their dogs, eat with their dogs and sleep with their dogs. Now the Simms' dynasty has created another way for dog owners to idolize their pets: the Lazy Dog Cafe. Dog worship is out of control. Carole Wade Century City
BUSINESS
April 12, 1999 | KAREN KAPLAN
PetJungle.com, an Idealab e-commerce start-up, is so devoted to its core market that it recently named Norris McGovern as its co-president and chief executive. McGovern, a springer spaniel-black lab mix, is sharing the executive suite with his master, Tom McGovern, former senior vice president of Time Warner's Warner Bros. Studio Stores. That retail background will help Pasadena-based PetJungle.
BUSINESS
June 21, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
About the only time people notice light bulbs is when they blow out. Yet a trio of TV commercials for a light bulb company--including one where two men are trying to defuse a time bomb when the lights go out--not only got noticed Monday evening, they also walked off with the top award in advertising.
MAGAZINE
December 3, 1989 | N.Y.
IN THE PAST TWO years, California legislators have introduced three bills that would regulate the pet industry. Only one of them--a bill backed by the million-dollar-a-year pet-store lobby--is still pending. Assemblyman Sam Farr (D-Santa Cruz) introduced two measures that would have prohibited the importation and commercial sale of any puppy under 12 weeks of age.
NEWS
October 19, 2008 | Melissa Patterson, Chicago Tribune
The puggles, maltepoos and labradoodles scampering along city streets are bred to be cute and customizable, pet industry experts say. But these pricey "designer dogs" are also exploited by abusive breeders and unscrupulous sellers, leading to more sick puppies and unhappy owners, according to the Humane Society of the United States. Like puppy mills that produce non-hybrids, these operations are hurting the animals through neglect and poor care, the society says. Made fashionable by celebrities like Jake Gyllenhaal and Jessica Simpson, hybrid puppies -- the offspring of two purebred dogs -- often go for more money than purebreds, which can range from $200 to $2,000 per dog. Hybrid puppy breeding operations are cropping up in rural areas from Pennsylvania to Kansas, animal advocates say. But a big hot spot for hybrid owners, said pet industry insider Laura Bennett, is much closer to home.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2005 | Sara Clarke, Times Staff Writer
As Justin Rudd talks about his Valentine's Day plans, there is an eager listener sitting nearby. Her ears perk up as she hears him spell out "b-e-a-c-h." Rudd recently completed his Valentine's card for Rosie, one of the loves of his life. It has a whimsical pink outer-space theme, and on the inside is the endearment, "You mean the world to me." Inside is a picture of her. She's a looker, though a bit wrinkly for her age. Of course, that's to be expected. Rosie is a 7-year-old English bulldog.
BUSINESS
December 26, 2004
Chris Simms' new restaurant's dog theme is extremely disturbing ("Hoping Diners Will Sit, Stay," Dec. 1). The pet industry knows that dog owners treat their pets as if they were children. Today's owners bathe with their dogs, eat with their dogs and sleep with their dogs. Now the Simms' dynasty has created another way for dog owners to idolize their pets: the Lazy Dog Cafe. Dog worship is out of control. Carole Wade Century City
BUSINESS
July 12, 2003 | Elizabeth Kelly, Times Staff Writer
If the fur and feather-boa canopy beds, lemon rosemary chicken dinners and enameled jewelry on display at the Anaheim Convention Center are any indication, pets are living as well -- if not better -- than their humans. Americans shelled out nearly $30 billion on pet care last year, more than double what they spent a decade ago, boosting an industry that has shown remarkable resistance during the economic slump.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shopping for pet food can be a confusing experience. In addition to the hundreds of competing food products, shoppers face a growing array of supplements--glucosamine for pets with deteriorating joints, St. John's Wort for animals suffering from depression, chicory to promote better digestion and herb blends to deal with bad breath. Some products promise to attack basic problems--tonics to reduce hairballs in cats and concoctions that promise to reduce odors caused by bowel movements.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2001 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An increasingly bitter fight is building along the pet food aisle, as some of the best-known consumer goods companies scramble for increased share in the $30-billion worldwide market for pet food. The ongoing consolidation is reshaping how and where pet supplies are sold and leading to a widening array of pet foods, supplements, treats and accessories--not to mention a rising level of rivalry. Procter & Gamble Co. entered the fray in 1999 with the $2.
NEWS
June 11, 2001 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the possible exception of Mr. Ed, Flipper and the Taco Bell Chihuahua, animals are pretty dumb. They've never invented fire, the wheel or Palm Pilot personal organizers (sample dog schedule: wake up, nap, torment mailman, nap, lick self, meditate/nap, work on anti-cat nuclear missile, nap). Fortunately, humans are slaving away to bridge this technology gap. At last weekend's American Pet Products Manufacturers Assn.
BUSINESS
June 4, 2001 | KAREN E. KLEIN
Craig and Laura O'Keefe started producing aromatherapy-inspired dog-grooming products on a shoestring budget in 1999. With no outside financing, they used savings and credit cards to get their pet shampoos and deodorizers to the marketplace. Relying on entrepreneurial boldness, the couple made industry contacts and selected manufacturers and vendors that have helped their company grow. Craig O'Keefe was interviewed by freelance writer Karen E. Klein. Pet Aromatics was born out of necessity.
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