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Pet Stores

NEWS
November 16, 1996 | MICHAEL KRIKORIAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As Ron Brooks drove to his Silver Lake home Tuesday evening, he saw the local pet store owner, Chuck Willard, standing on the corner waving hello to him. What a great, small-town feel this neighborhood has, and that guy is one of the reasons, Brooks thought to himself. An hour later, Willard, 64, was dead, murdered during an attempted robbery at his store.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1996
Tarantula Talk Tarantulas have hairy bodies and look fierce but in most cases their bite isn't any more dangerous than a bee's sting. A few facts and myths: Etmology: Name comes from type of wolf spider found in Tarato, Italy. Size: 1 to 8 inches long. Life span: Up to 20 years. Venom: Tarantulas sold in pet stores are not poisonous to humans. Pet store cost: From $15 to $700. Diet: Anything alive, usually crickets; prefers "pinkies" or "fuzzies".
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1996 | KAY HWANGBO
Local residents and the owners of a Ventura Boulevard pet-supply shop were unsuccessful this week in resolving neighbors' concerns about the shop's plans to begin dog-grooming activities. Wednesday night's meeting was sponsored by City Councilman Mike Feuer's office after the city's Board of Zoning Appeals upheld a zoning administrator's granting Petco a variance to groom dogs and sell small pets.
FOOD
July 20, 1995
Special thanks for rounding up the material about birds. I have a large Amazon yellow nape named Pico and feed him carrots, cabbage (he hates any kind of lettuce; thank God, at those prices), apples, grapes, peaches, mangoes, pistachio nuts, sometimes whole almonds, peanuts and more. Oh, yes, he likes challah because of the raisins in it and the shiny crust. My friend buys it for him at her fave bakery and she calls him Mr. Seagull. Very little information is in any of those bird books in pet stores--your material is a treasure.
BUSINESS
May 23, 1995 | GREG JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John and Kimberly Keigwin bought Noah's Ark Pet Kingdom here in 1988 as a business and a labor of love. Blending his retailing knowledge with her love of animals, the Keigwins patiently groomed the store, installing new fixtures and updating ragged accounting and inventory techniques. Later they added an adjacent storefront. But the Keigwins are keeping a wary eye on new competition: Super Pets, a warehouse-style chain store that opened less than a mile away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1995
Health officials on Monday removed 39 animals from a Boyle Heights pet shop where the owners allegedly mishandled their stock and sold sick pets. Officials from the county Health Department, the Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Southern California Humane Society took the "menagerie of neglected animals" from the Elias Pet Shop, said SPCA spokeswoman Mary Wamsley. The animals were taken to an SPCA shelter, she said.
NEWS
October 27, 1994 | From Associated Press
A death threat, the likelihood of being forced out of business and the possibility of lawsuits are the price pet store owner Tim Jandebeur is paying for selling a kitten that later died of rabies. Hundreds of people who played with kittens in his store may also pay a price--rabies shots--though no cases of the deadly disease in humans have been reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1994 | PHIL SNEIDERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three incumbent City Council members, facing 10 challengers in Tuesday's election, have been forced time and again while campaigning to defend their decision to lure a large pet-supply store to town. At political forums and in interviews with the candidates, the fur has flown most often over the council's vote last year to spend up to $187,500 in redevelopment funds over 7 1/2 years to persuade PetSmart to open in Lancaster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1994 | DAVID WHARTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The instant the shaking stopped, Udie Nathan had one thing on his mind: puppies and kittens. As manager of Petland in the Northridge Fashion Center, Nathan feared for the lives of more than 100 dogs, cats, birds, reptiles and rodents in his store. By the time he rushed from his Granada Hills home to the mall--within half an hour after the Northridge quake--the store's owner, Ilan Eliav, had already arrived. The mall, roughly a mile from the temblor's epicenter, stood in shambles.
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