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Pet Therapy

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1990 | JENNIFER J. BUSH
Three unusual therapists walked on all fours into Beverly Manor Convalescent Hospital in Capistrano Beach last week. The therapists were 4-week-old puppies from the San Clemente Animal Shelter, brought by volunteers as part of a pet therapy-visitation program. "People come to life when you bring a puppy or a kitten through the door," said Norma Corish, program director. The animals not only give the elderly residents something fun to look forward to, but also seem to be emotionally therapeutic.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | CARRI KARUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a regular group of visitors to the Fitzgerald Senior Day Support Center in Thousand Oaks who always seem welcome. And though they don't say much, they tend to get many of the guests talking. Grace Paloutzian of Oak Park couldn't say enough about her visit with Mac, a gray Irish wolfhound who walked right up to the 87-year-old and planted several slobbery kisses on her cheek. "It makes my heart . . . happy," said Paloutzian.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | DAVID AVILA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pets are usually banned from entering hospitals, but Wednesday a couple of dogs, a cat, two guinea pigs and a rabbit were allowed into Grossmont Hospital to cheer up a special group of patients. The pets were part of a program developed by the San Diego Humane Society, which sends small animals to hospitals, convalescent homes, youth centers and schools to help in pet-assisted therapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | BRENDA LOREE
Buster the dog pads down the halls of the Californian Convalescent Hospital, almost prancing in the knowledge that he is about to receive 470 pats and neck rubs in the next 90 minutes. Like a feather duster, his tail brushes the spokes of the occasional wheelchair wheel as he passes. Or pauses, if the occupant looks as if he or she might be good for one of those pats. Buster is courteous, though, and bothers no one who doesn't welcome the golden retriever's slobbery presence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One year ago, Norma Bivens committed the child she loved and feared into the hands of the Fairview Developmental Center. Mark Bivens, 17, had spent much of his life in the same howling rage that characterizes a spoiled 4-year-old. At home, he would tear up furniture. In stores and restaurants, Mark threw screaming fits when denied anything. And worse, he took his anger out on his mother, using his fists and feet in bursts of violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
There are some memories that even Alzheimer's disease cannot steal. There are times when Gertrude Frazier can't remember her daughter's name. But she remembers her childhood on a Tennessee farm with perfect clarity, recalling with fondness the taste of stewed squirrel and how the barnyard chickens scratched for feed in the dirt. And when a fluffy, month-old chick was passed around her adult-day-care center in Mission Viejo recently, the 86-year-old woman blurted out its name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | CATHY WERBLIN
David Quinlan had finished Thursday's round of medical treatment. Lying in his darkened hospital room, the 6-year-old brain tumor patient watched television with his mom and dad and waited to go home. Then in came Becks, a 5-year-old German shepherd and trained pet therapist who brightens the days of Children's Hospital of Orange County's littlest, and often sickest, patients.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 2001 | CARRI KARUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
There is a regular group of visitors to the Fitzgerald Senior Day Support Center in Thousand Oaks who always seem welcome. And though they don't say much, they tend to get many of the guests talking. Grace Paloutzian of Oak Park couldn't say enough about her visit with Mac, a gray Irish wolfhound who walked right up to the 87-year-old and planted several slobbery kisses on her cheek. "It makes my heart . . . happy," said Paloutzian.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1998 | BRENDA LOREE
Buster the dog pads down the halls of the Californian Convalescent Hospital, almost prancing in the knowledge that he is about to receive 470 pats and neck rubs in the next 90 minutes. Like a feather duster, his tail brushes the spokes of the occasional wheelchair wheel as he passes. Or pauses, if the occupant looks as if he or she might be good for one of those pats. Buster is courteous, though, and bothers no one who doesn't welcome the golden retriever's slobbery presence.
NEWS
October 12, 1986 | JOHN SWENSON, United Press International
Matthew Leuthner, an 18-year-old awaiting sentencing for auto theft, walked out of the tough-guy hell of his cellblock into a roomful of smiling volunteer visitors and an assortment of pets. Leuthner and eight other young men at Rikers Island Adolescent Detention Center met two cats named Yum Yum and Amanda; three dogs named Pepper, Duman and Duncan; and a tortoise named Oscar the Grouch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1997 | CATHY WERBLIN
David Quinlan had finished Thursday's round of medical treatment. Lying in his darkened hospital room, the 6-year-old brain tumor patient watched television with his mom and dad and waited to go home. Then in came Becks, a 5-year-old German shepherd and trained pet therapist who brightens the days of Children's Hospital of Orange County's littlest, and often sickest, patients.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | MARY ESCH, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Janelle Lalonde is locked in a silent shell that few can penetrate. But her new friend, Kyra, is helping her emerge. Last July, the 18-year-old woman, nicknamed Nell, smashed her head on a rock ledge in a car accident. Despite four brain operations, she remains paralyzed, speechless and barely responsive. In October, Lalonde came to the Hilltop Manor rehabilitation center in this Albany suburb. Here, thanks in part to Kyra, an extraordinary therapy assistant, Lalonde is progressing in the excruciating work of relearning the tiniest tasks: moving an arm, twitching a smile muscle.
NEWS
April 2, 1992 | KAREN DARDICK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Scamp, a 14-year-old blue Burmese cat, snuggled contentedly into the lap of Ruth Robertson, a resident of The Episcopal Home in Alhambra. "It's been such a long time since a cat has been on my lap," the 95-year-old woman reminisced. "It feels wonderful". "Scamp lives up to his name at home, but he always behaves himself during the visits," said her owner, Sylvia Terrones. "He loves them because people tell him how wonderful he is and he loves being fussed over."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1991 | DAVID AVILA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pets are usually banned from entering hospitals, but Wednesday a couple of dogs, a cat, two guinea pigs and a rabbit were allowed into Grossmont Hospital to cheer up a special group of patients. The pets were part of a program developed by the San Diego Humane Society, which sends small animals to hospitals, convalescent homes, youth centers and schools to help in pet-assisted therapy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One year ago, Norma Bivens committed the child she loved and feared into the hands of the Fairview Developmental Center. Mark Bivens, 17, had spent much of his life in the same howling rage that characterizes a spoiled 4-year-old. At home, he would tear up furniture. In stores and restaurants, Mark threw screaming fits when denied anything. And worse, he took his anger out on his mother, using his fists and feet in bursts of violence.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 1991 | FRANK MESSINA
There are some memories that even Alzheimer's disease cannot steal. There are times when Gertrude Frazier can't remember her daughter's name. But she remembers her childhood on a Tennessee farm with perfect clarity, recalling with fondness the taste of stewed squirrel and how the barnyard chickens scratched for feed in the dirt. And when a fluffy, month-old chick was passed around her adult-day-care center in Mission Viejo recently, the 86-year-old woman blurted out its name.
NEWS
January 8, 1989 | Zan Thompson
An hour after the sun climbs over the Pacific Palisades and paves the ocean with gold, Holli Pfau and her big Labrador retriever, Nikki, start for work clear across town in Pasadena. Holly and Nikki are members of the pet therapy team at Huntington Memorial Hospital. And at the top of Santa Clarita Valley, deep in Canyon Country, Jenny Hamilton and Saffron start the same journey from another side of the county. Jenny says: "I'm the colonial. I'm from New Zealand."
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