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Pete Seeger

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ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Folk musician and activist Pete Seeger did many, many things during his 94 years, but there's one thing he did just once: make a music video. That video of Seeger singing Bob Dylan's “Forever Young” has gone viral in the wake of his death Monday. The video, for which he was joined on Dylan's song by the Grammy-winning Rivertown Kids choir that he had mentored, has now been viewed more than 500,000 times, up from around 120,000 about a week earlier. Additionally, the Woody Guthrie Archive and the Grammy Museum announced Wednesday that they will move forward with previously announced plans to honor Seeger as the first recipient of the new Woody Guthrie Prize in a ceremony that had already been scheduled to take place in New York on Feb. 22. PHOTOS: Pete Seeger, activist and humanitarian “The only thing I know for certain is that Pete would want us to gather together and make some music,” Woody Guthrie's daughter Nora Guthrie said in a statement.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Driving home from a performance of Handel's "Theodora" the night Pete Seeger died, I switched on the radio. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" was playing. It was an extraordinary concurrence. Handel's oratorio concerns political protest. Christian martyrs Theodora and her lover stand up to bad government, as Seeger so often, so famously and so effectively did. Handel's score has an unromanticized directness, another Seeger specialty. Plus Seeger, like Handel, lifted spirits, however sad the subject.
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NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The National Portrait Gallery on Tuesday marked the death of musician and social activist Pete Seeger by placing a portrait of the folk singer on display in the museum's first-floor gallery. Seeger died Monday at age 94. The photograph by Sid Grossman shows a young Seeger with his banjo in hand and an exuberant smile, sometime between 1946 and 1948. At the time, Seeger was active at labor rallies in the U.S. and organized the quartet the Weavers. "Blacklisted for his leftist politics in the 1950s, Seeger resurfaced in the 1960s and sparked a folk revival with such classics as 'If I Had a Hammer,' 'Where Have All the Flowers Gone?
OPINION
February 1, 2014
Letters written in response to an obituary rarely number more than a few. The Times' article this week on the life and passing of balladeer Pete Seeger, by contrast, drew nearly two dozen letters. Most who wrote reflected on Seeger's music, but some shared their personal experiences with the folk singer. One reader sent us a lengthy letter she received from Seeger in 1962 in response to her fan mail. "Take it easy, but take it," Seeger ended his response. Here is a selection of the letters on Seeger.
NEWS
October 22, 2011 | By Geraldine Baum, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Folk music legend Pete Seeger led Occupy Wall Street protesters in song late Friday in Manhattan. Seeger, 92, had joined marchers on the Upper West Side earlier in the evening. When they reached Columbus Circle, he led them in a rendition of "This Little Light of Mine. " He was accompanied by his grandson, Tao Rodgriguez-Seeger, along with fellow artists Arlo Guthrie, Tom Chapin and David Amram. The musicians had all performed Friday night at Symphony Space on the Upper West Side and then fell in line with a crowd of about 1,000 demonstrators who marched down Broadway, according to the Associated Press.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Pete Seeger, the singer, songwriter and social activist who died  Monday at age 94, didn't have much of a movie career, making his mark with music instead. But the troubadour did pop up on screen from time to time, in documentaries, concert footage, his own TV series and even the odd comedy. Here's a look at some of Seeger's work on the big and small screens. "To Hear Your Banjo Play" (1947) In 1947, a young Seeger appeared in and narrated this 16-minute survey of folk music in the U.S. written by musicologist Alan Lomax.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Driving home from a performance of Handel's "Theodora" the night Pete Seeger died, I switched on the radio. "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" was playing. It was an extraordinary concurrence. Handel's oratorio concerns political protest. Christian martyrs Theodora and her lover stand up to bad government, as Seeger so often, so famously and so effectively did. Handel's score has an unromanticized directness, another Seeger specialty. Plus Seeger, like Handel, lifted spirits, however sad the subject.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Claudia Luther, This article has been corrected, as indicated below.
Pete Seeger was a teenager in the 1930s when he heard an Appalachian balladeer perform on an old-fashioned, five-string banjo and fell in love with the instrument, the timeless melodies and, most of all, the words. "Compared to the trivialities of most popular songs," he said later, "the words of these songs had all the meat of human life in them.... They seemed frank, straightforward, honest. " In time, Seeger would arm himself with a banjo, a guitar and the transformative power of music to battle injustice in America and become the folk legend behind numbers such as "We Shall Overcome," "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "Turn!
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Folk singer and political activist Pete Seeger , who died Tuesday at age 94, was more than a folk singer, of course. He also was a political radical, and for all the gentleness of his lyrics, he seemed to have been built around a spine of steel. Seeger was already a popular entertainer and political activist when on Aug. 18, 1955, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee , the witch-hunt tribunal that sought to ferret out information on what it deemed subversive activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2007 | From the Associated Press
A book by Pete Seeger about a young musician who loses his hearing and a wordless story about an underwater camera were among the winners of children's book prizes announced Monday by the American Library Assn. The John Newbery Medal for outstanding contribution was awarded to Susan Patron's "The Higher Power of Lucky," the adventures of a 10-year-old girl and her search for a higher power.
NEWS
February 1, 2014 | By Kari Howard
This week I've been a bit obsessed with Isaac Hayes' epic, transformative covers of some (very non-Stax) pop hits. I already knew the tremendous “Hot Buttered Soul” album, with its 12-minute “Walk on By” (which manages to channel the pathos of Hal David's lyrics and be very sexy at the same time), and 18-minute “By the Time I Get to Phoenix” (more on that later). But then I found his other covers, including two more Bacharach/David songs, “The Look of Love” and “I Just Don't Know What to Do With Myself”; the Beatles' “Something”; and the Righteous Brothers' “You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin',” which has a five-minute groove starting at the 10:30 point that I had on repeat all week.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Folk musician and activist Pete Seeger did many, many things during his 94 years, but there's one thing he did just once: make a music video. That video of Seeger singing Bob Dylan's “Forever Young” has gone viral in the wake of his death Monday. The video, for which he was joined on Dylan's song by the Grammy-winning Rivertown Kids choir that he had mentored, has now been viewed more than 500,000 times, up from around 120,000 about a week earlier. Additionally, the Woody Guthrie Archive and the Grammy Museum announced Wednesday that they will move forward with previously announced plans to honor Seeger as the first recipient of the new Woody Guthrie Prize in a ceremony that had already been scheduled to take place in New York on Feb. 22. PHOTOS: Pete Seeger, activist and humanitarian “The only thing I know for certain is that Pete would want us to gather together and make some music,” Woody Guthrie's daughter Nora Guthrie said in a statement.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Mary Forgione, Daily Deal and Travel Blogger
The National Portrait Gallery on Tuesday marked the death of musician and social activist Pete Seeger by placing a portrait of the folk singer on display in the museum's first-floor gallery. Seeger died Monday at age 94. The photograph by Sid Grossman shows a young Seeger with his banjo in hand and an exuberant smile, sometime between 1946 and 1948. At the time, Seeger was active at labor rallies in the U.S. and organized the quartet the Weavers. "Blacklisted for his leftist politics in the 1950s, Seeger resurfaced in the 1960s and sparked a folk revival with such classics as 'If I Had a Hammer,' 'Where Have All the Flowers Gone?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Randall Roberts
Pete Seeger was best known as a folk singer, an archivist and writer, and the purveyor of such beamed-from-the-heavens standards as "We Shall Overcome," "If I Had a Hammer" and "Turn, Turn, Turn. " But among the musician's most important roles was one that's often overlooked: that of an American citizen who understood the power of song to serve as messenger, as Trojan horse, as lightning rod. It's hard to imagine a song steering and stirring more than "We Shall Overcome. " The work long ago became less the domain of Seeger, who helped popularize it when he published it in "People's Songs," than a sacred text owned by anyone longing for justice.
NEWS
January 29, 2014 | By Scott Martelle
Folk singer and political activist Pete Seeger , who died Tuesday at age 94, was more than a folk singer, of course. He also was a political radical, and for all the gentleness of his lyrics, he seemed to have been built around a spine of steel. Seeger was already a popular entertainer and political activist when on Aug. 18, 1955, he was called before the House Un-American Activities Committee , the witch-hunt tribunal that sought to ferret out information on what it deemed subversive activities.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Joe Flint
After the coffee. Before getting in State of the Union mode. The Skinny: I've watched the first two episodes of Fox's "The Following," and while the producers have done a good job coming up with compelling and creepy new characters, I'm not sure I'm up for another season of murder and mayhem. It's very draining. Tuesday's headlines include the latest twist in Charter's efforts to buy Time Warner Cable. Also, movie theater owners want shorter trailers and media pundits are busy analyzing Jay Leno's final interviews.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 29, 2014 | By Randall Roberts
Pete Seeger was best known as a folk singer, an archivist and writer, and the purveyor of such beamed-from-the-heavens standards as "We Shall Overcome," "If I Had a Hammer" and "Turn, Turn, Turn. " But among the musician's most important roles was one that's often overlooked: that of an American citizen who understood the power of song to serve as messenger, as Trojan horse, as lightning rod. It's hard to imagine a song steering and stirring more than "We Shall Overcome. " The work long ago became less the domain of Seeger, who helped popularize it when he published it in "People's Songs," than a sacred text owned by anyone longing for justice.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1994 | ROBERT KOEHLER
The autumnal feeling that descends over "Pure Pete Seeger" would seem to cut directly against the folk singer's lifetime of passionate commitment to the power of song and grass-roots activism. This was a man, after all, who rode the rails with Woody Guthrie, cajoled record companies and TV networks into paying attention to folk music when swing and Sinatra ruled, and endured the McCarthy era blacklisting scourge. Pete Seeger, even at 75, is not one to go quietly into that good night.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By August Brown
Pete Seeger's death at 94 leaves a huge hole in America's moral conscience. The folk singer was a fixture in music, politics and American life for the latter half of the 20th century, and he continued performing and speaking in public -- including at President Obama's 2009 inauguration and during the Occupy Wall Street protests -- until his death on Monday. The outpouring from fellow musicians, writers and activists was immediate. The White House released a statement describing Seeger as "America's tuning fork," and said that "[o]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2014 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Pete Seeger, folk singer, activist, song archivist and one of the most important American musical voices of the 20th century, has died at age 94, his grandson Kitama Cahill-Jackson told the Associated Press. The singer, who lost his wife, Toshi, last year, was responsible for such classics of American song as "We Shall Overcome," "Where Have All the Flowers Gone" and "Turn, Turn, Turn. "  VIDEO: 'Turn, Turn, Turn' As Claudia Luther noted in the Times' obituary , Seeger influenced generations: "At some point, Pete Seeger decided he'd be a walking, singing reminder of all of America's history," Bruce Springsteen said at the all-star Madison Square Garden concert marking Seeger's 90th birthday in 2009.
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