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Pete Stark

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NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Rep. Pete Stark, dean of California's congressional delegation, arrived in the House when Richard Nixon occupied the White House and John McCain was in a POW camp. Now, at age 80, Stark, one of Congress' most liberal and outspoken Democrats, faces perhaps the toughest campaign since he was first elected 40 years ago. Eric Swalwell, his aggressive 31-year-old challenger in a new East San Francisco Bay district, is taking a page out of the playbook Stark used in 1972 to oust fellow Democrat George P. Miller, the then 81-year-old dean of the California delegation: It's time for change.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
October 23, 2012 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Rep. Pete Stark, dean of California's congressional delegation, arrived in the House when Richard Nixon occupied the White House and John McCain was in a POW camp. Now, at age 80, Stark, one of Congress' most liberal and outspoken Democrats, faces perhaps the toughest campaign since he was first elected 40 years ago. Eric Swalwell, his aggressive 31-year-old challenger in a new East San Francisco Bay district, is taking a page out of the playbook Stark used in 1972 to oust fellow Democrat George P. Miller, the then 81-year-old dean of the California delegation: It's time for change.
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OPINION
March 15, 2007
THERE ARE A gazillion ways to get into trouble in Washington, but Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont) has picked one of the rarest: He has come out of the closet and acknowledged that he does not believe in God. Stark outed himself in a questionnaire from the Secular Coalition for America, which searched for elected officials willing to identify themselves as nonbelievers. It found only four, including Stark, and it claims that he is "the first open nontheist in the history of the Congress."
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By James Oliphant
Concerns by fellow members of the House Ways and Means Committee over Rep. Pete Stark's politics, background and history of controversial statements led to the surprise decision Thursday to have another congressman replace the embattled Rep. Charles B. Rangel as the committee chairman. Stark (D-Fremont) had been in line for the powerful post after Rangel announced Wednesday that he was stepping down until a House ethics panel finished investigating him. On Thursday, however, Stark agreed to step aside in favor of Rep. Sander M. Levin (D-Mich.
NEWS
March 23, 1994 | JAMES BORNEMEIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the White House, watching Rep. Pete Stark (D-Hayward) maneuver his health care reform package through the House Ways and Means health subcommittee is a bit like having your eccentric uncle borrow the car. Your palms get sweaty just thinking about it. The cantankerous 11-term liberal, who has chaired the health panel since 1985, thrives on confrontation, takes direction poorly and has a habit of unleashing outlandish remarks.
NEWS
August 23, 1989
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Oakland) urged the Internal Revenue Service to "inspect with a fine-tooth comb" any attempt by magazine Publisher Malcolm Forbes to claim tax deductions for his 70th birthday bash in Morocco. Stark, a member of the House Ways and Means Committee, raised concerns about possible tax write-offs for party expenses in a letter to IRS Commissioner Fred T. Goldberg Jr. dated Monday.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The chairman of a House health subcommittee said today that he should not have called Louis W. Sullivan "a disgrace to his race" when he criticized the Health and Human Services secretary. "To the secretary, I have to say I blew it," Rep. Pete Stark (D-Oakland) told the House. But he reiterated criticism of Sullivan, who is black, for supporting Administration policies that are "bankrupt" and damaging to minorities.
NEWS
August 3, 1990 | MARLENE CIMONS and JANNY SCOTT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Oakland) Thursday said that Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan approaches being "a disgrace to his profession and his race," prompting a furious Sullivan to retort: "I don't live on Pete Stark's plantation." The California congressman, chairman of the Ways and Means subcommittee on health, said that the Bush Administration's only black Cabinet member has "turned his back on the poor, most of whom are minorities," so that he can keep his job.
NEWS
October 3, 1989
The House faces a showdown vote today on the 1988 catastrophic illness insurance law. The law's author, Rep. Pete Stark (D-Oakland), predicted that lawmakers would vote to abolish the controversial income-based supplemental premium that was to have funded many additional benefits in the biggest expansion of Medicare since its inception in 1966. Stark, who drew up the Catastrophic Health Insurance Act, plans to push an amendment to maintain some of the law's benefits.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | From United Press International
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Oakland) today said Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan is a "disgrace to his profession and his race," charging that the lone black Cabinet member changed his views on sensitive issues to appease President Bush. Sullivan reacted angrily to the remarks, calling them "paternalistic and frankly racist" and demanded an apology. "I don't live on Pete Stark's plantation," Sullivan said. "I wish he had the guts to say that to my face.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Richard Simon
In an untraditional twist, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said Thursday that Rep. Sander Levin (D-Mich.) will replace Rep. Charles Rangel as acting chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee rather than Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont). Because of seniority, Stark had been in line to take the job and, as of Wednesday evening, House Democrats indicated that it was his, at least on an interim basis. But Stark's politics -- he's an unapologetic liberal -- and his volatility, with a history of making controversial and provocative statements, concerned other members of the committee as well as the Democratic leadership.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2010 | By James Oliphant and Richard Simon
Democratic Rep. Charles B. Rangel, the chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee who has been dogged by ethics questions, temporarily stepped down from the powerful post Wednesday, shaking up the panel at a crucial time for his party. Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont), one of the most liberal and outspoken members of the House, is expected to take over the influential committee, which writes tax legislation and has sweeping power over any measure that affects revenue. The ascension of Stark, a congressman since the Nixon presidency and dean of the California congressional delegation, "should energize the committee," said Rick Weissenstein, a healthcare analyst with Washington Research Group, a policy and market research firm.
NATIONAL
October 26, 2009 | Faye Fiore
Pete Stark is sitting in a gilded meeting room in the House of Representatives. It is home to the powerful Ways and Means Committee that the Northern California Democrat might never chair, precisely because of the sort of verbal exchange he is attempting to explain at the moment: "He said to me, 'Don't pee on my leg.' And in a sense I said, 'I won't.' " Stark, nearly 78, is dissecting the latest in a hit parade of outbursts, this one pertaining to the likelihood of California's longest-serving congressman relieving himself on a constituent.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2009 | Richard Simon
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont), dean of the California congressional delegation, has claimed his Maryland home as his principal residence to qualify for a $3,770 tax break, even though it is thousands of miles from the Northern California district he represents -- and where he is registered to vote. A senior member of the House's tax-writing Ways and Means Committee, Stark said he was unaware that he might not be eligible for the tax break.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2009 | Joanna Lin
As he ran for the White House, John F. Kennedy assured skeptical Americans that he was "not the Catholic candidate for president," but rather a "candidate for president who happens also to be Catholic." In 1961, the year he took office, Catholics accounted for 18.8% of Congress. On Tuesday, when the 111th Congress is sworn in, about 30% of its membership will be Catholic, according to a recent analysis by Congressional Quarterly and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life.
OPINION
October 28, 2007 | Swati Pandey
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont) got into trouble this month when he said on the House floor that Republicans were sending troops to Iraq "to get their heads blown off for the president's amusement." He later apologized, but it wasn't the first time that his words came back to haunt him. Here's a sampling of his verbal fireworks. -- Swati Pandey -- Blunder: Responding in July 2003 to then-Colorado GOP Rep.
NEWS
March 11, 1995 | from The Washington Post
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Hayward) on Friday apologized to Rep. Nancy L. Johnson (R-Conn.) for calling her a "whore for the insurance industry" in a private conversation three weeks ago, a Stark aide said. Johnson's staff confirmed that an envelope from Stark, addressed to the congresswoman and marked "personal and confidential," arrived at her Capitol Hill office Friday afternoon.
OPINION
October 28, 2007 | Swati Pandey
Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont) got into trouble this month when he said on the House floor that Republicans were sending troops to Iraq "to get their heads blown off for the president's amusement." He later apologized, but it wasn't the first time that his words came back to haunt him. Here's a sampling of his verbal fireworks. -- Swati Pandey -- Blunder: Responding in July 2003 to then-Colorado GOP Rep.
NATIONAL
October 24, 2007 | Johanna Neuman, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Pete Stark apologized Tuesday for saying last week that the White House was sending young Americans to Iraq "to get their heads blown off for the president's amusement." Stark's apology, on the House floor, came after Republicans failed to win a vote censuring the Democrat from Fremont for "despicable conduct." The vote was 196 to 173 to kill the measure, with 168 Republicans and five Democrats supporting censure.
OPINION
March 15, 2007
THERE ARE A gazillion ways to get into trouble in Washington, but Rep. Pete Stark (D-Fremont) has picked one of the rarest: He has come out of the closet and acknowledged that he does not believe in God. Stark outed himself in a questionnaire from the Secular Coalition for America, which searched for elected officials willing to identify themselves as nonbelievers. It found only four, including Stark, and it claims that he is "the first open nontheist in the history of the Congress."
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