Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsPeter Bart
IN THE NEWS

Peter Bart

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart will be reinstated as editor in chief of Variety and Daily Variety, the influential entertainment industry trade papers, after completing a 21-day suspension without pay, the papers' parent company announced Thursday. Bart, 69, an increasingly powerful and controversial figure in Hollywood during his 12-year reign at Variety, was suspended Aug. 17, the day after Los Angeles magazine published a 14-page cover story on him.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2012 | By Patrick Goldstein, Los Angeles Times
I once asked a famous producer how he first became fascinated with Hollywood. His answer? "When I was 14, I got a subscription to Variety. " And no wonder. For more than a century, Variety was the most trusted brand in the entertainment industry, the bible of showbiz. But those days are gone. Media outlets everywhere are wrestling with how to generate revenue as readers have abandoned print for easy Web access to information. But Variety has been hit especially hard by its core audience's migration to the Internet.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | John Horn and Claudia Eller
For much of the 20th century, Variety was the entertainment industry's bible, a must-read of Hollywood. Barely into the 21st, the venerable trade newspaper has been dethroned by bloggers and collapsing revenue. Now its formidable editor in chief -- who taps out blog posts on a typewriter and reads e-mails on paper -- has ended his 20-year reign as the publication looks to remake itself for the digital age. Peter Bart, a Quaker-educated New Yorker with a Perry White temper, William F.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | John Horn and Claudia Eller
For much of the 20th century, Variety was the entertainment industry's bible, a must-read of Hollywood. Barely into the 21st, the venerable trade newspaper has been dethroned by bloggers and collapsing revenue. Now its formidable editor in chief -- who taps out blog posts on a typewriter and reads e-mails on paper -- has ended his 20-year reign as the publication looks to remake itself for the digital age. Peter Bart, a Quaker-educated New Yorker with a Perry White temper, William F.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 1990 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1982, the book "Indecent Exposure" zeroed in on forgeries and embezzlement by then-Columbia Pictures production chief David Begelman. Three years later, "Final Cut" documented how spiraling costs on the film "Heaven's Gate" triggered the downfall of United Artists. Now comes "Fade Out: The Calamitous Final Days of MGM," an examination by former MGM/UA senior vice president Peter Bart of the decline of the Culver City studio under the 20-year aegis of financier Kirk Kerkorian.
NEWS
August 18, 2001 | DAVID SHAW and RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Bart, long one of the most powerful and controversial figures in Hollywood, was suspended Friday from his job as editor in chief of Variety, the dominant trade paper in the entertainment industry, pending an investigation of charges that he has behaved unethically and frequently used racist, sexist and anti-gay language.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
As all Hollywood big shots know, any idea that shows a glimmer of success warrants consideration for franchise or brand-exploitation possibilities. It's natural, then, that with a combined six decades of showbiz experience between them, two of the town's bigger shots -- Peter Bart and Peter Guber -- employed just such a strategy with their insiders' take on Hollywood. First came the UCLA seminar series, dubbed "Shoot-Out!
BOOKS
June 10, 1990 | Dale M. Pollock, Since leaving The Times, Pollock has produced four features for A&M Films. and
When I left the Los Angeles Times five years ago to enter film production, the common presumption was that I would end up writing a book about my new life. "Just have a tape recorder ready when you get home every night," one studio executive told me. "You won't believe the material that will present itself." When a journalist trained as an observer is plunked down into Hollywood's maelstrom of ego, greed and jealousy, the inevitable is assumed. How can you resist telling tales?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
We shall be glad to print nice things about you if you rate them. Maybe you'll rate the other kind. We'll print that also. Whatever you rate, will be what you create. If it's good, that's fine. If it's bad, it'll be your own fault, so don't squawk. --From debut edition of Daily Variety, Sept. 6, 1933 It was a Hollywood business story worthy of front-page treatment. Carolco Pictures was teetering.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Employees at Daily Variety expressed outrage Wednesday after their editor sent a letter to the chairman of Paramount Communications criticizing a negative review of Paramount Pictures' summer hit "Patriot Games" that appeared in the entertainment newspaper. In a letter to Martin Davis, also Paramount Communications' chief executive, editor Peter Bart said the review "was, to put it in a word, unprofessional."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2009 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Memo to: Peter Bart I guess I knew things weren't going well when the big shots at various Hollywood agencies started telling me that they'd been canceling their Variety print subscriptions -- which, let's face it, cost almost as much as a decent used car -- because by the time the paper arrived in the morning they'd already read almost everything in it online. But still, the news that Tim Gray is now running the show and you're, well, stepping aside came as a shock.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2005 | Paul Brownfield, Times Staff Writer
You don't have to flip terribly much these days to find someone -- an actor or director or agent or producer -- in middiscussion about the difference between doing an independent film versus a Hollywood blockbuster and talking as if the distinction were a matter of national security.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 2003 | Merle Rubin, Special to The Times
It would actually be a shock if a story collection set in Hollywood, featuring an assortment of folks from the entertainment industry -- including a temperamental actress, her beleaguered personal manager, a hot young actor, a press agent, a screenwriter, a talent agent, various studio executives and a Realtor who models herself on Zsa Zsa Gabor -- were to reveal this world to be anything but shallow.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2003 | Lynn Smith, Times Staff Writer
As all Hollywood big shots know, any idea that shows a glimmer of success warrants consideration for franchise or brand-exploitation possibilities. It's natural, then, that with a combined six decades of showbiz experience between them, two of the town's bigger shots -- Peter Bart and Peter Guber -- employed just such a strategy with their insiders' take on Hollywood. First came the UCLA seminar series, dubbed "Shoot-Out!
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Bart , controversial editor in chief of Variety who was suspended without pay for three weeks after making what many considered inflammatory comments in a Los Angeles magazine profile, is once again dissected in the magazine. In a letter published in its December issue, which is out today, the former Mrs. Peter Bart takes issue with Bart's assertion that "he has never once dated a Jewish girl." "My name is Dorothy Callman," she writes. "I am Jewish.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2001 | DAVID SHAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Bart returned to his job as editor in chief of Variety on Monday amid continuing skepticism about the thoroughness of the investigation that led to both his reinstatement and his 21-day suspension without pay. When Cahners Business Information, the owners of Variety, announced Bart's reinstatement late last month, company officials said they had conducted a "very serious, in-depth investigation . . .
NEWS
November 16, 2001 | GINA PICCALO and LOUISE ROUG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Peter Bart , controversial editor in chief of Variety who was suspended without pay for three weeks after making what many considered inflammatory comments in a Los Angeles magazine profile, is once again dissected in the magazine. In a letter published in its December issue, which is out today, the former Mrs. Peter Bart takes issue with Bart's assertion that "he has never once dated a Jewish girl." "My name is Dorothy Callman," she writes. "I am Jewish.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1990 | David J. Fox
Variety, the show-biz weekly, was "kidding a bit" with last week's splashy, Page 1 headline--written in Japanese characters. So says editor Peter Bart, who translates the headline: "Buyer Beware"--a reference to the recent purchase of MCA Inc. by the Osaka-based electronics firm Matsushita. Bart and executive editor Caroline Miller got the idea when they heard a reporter say she had dreamed that Variety, itself a subsidiary of a British firm, was published all in Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 3, 2001 | STEVE LOPEZ
If you've been away on holiday and missed the big Hollywood story of the summer, allow me to catch you up on the continuing saga of Variety editor Peter Bart. Back in mid-August, Bart was exposed in Los Angeles magazine for use of offensive language, egomaniacal behavior, shopping a script, and using his position to advance his own interests, reward friends and punish enemies. There were only three options for the owners of Variety: 1) Double Bart's salary for a job well done.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2001 | JOHN RIDLEY, John Ridley is a novelist and NPR commentator. He has worked as a writer, producer and director in TV and films
Whew! I'm sure glad that's over! For a second there, I was about to get all bent out of shape over the Peter Bart situation--Bart having been recently suspended as editor-in-chief of Variety, the trade paper that 30,000-plus of us hungrily dig through every morning trying to find some trace of our names printed among the ads studios buy to convince us "The Wedding Planner" really was a good movie!
Los Angeles Times Articles
|