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Peter Broderick

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Following" is a taut, ingenious British neo noir in which its central character is a seedy young man (Jeremy Theobald) living a marginal existence so severe that he becomes obsessed with the act of following people. The intent is not to do them any harm, but simply to learn about their lives. He tells himself he's gathering material for the writing he plans to do, but what he's really doing is trying to fill up a remarkably empty life.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 1999 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Blood, Guts, Bullets & Octane" is a hilarious black comedy in which a pair of luckless, 30ish, small-town car salesmen, driven to desperation, agree to take 48-hour custody of a burgundy 1963 Pontiac Le Mans convertible--in exchange for $250,000. Blond and beefy Sid (Joe Carnahan, also the film's writer, director and editor) and Bob (Dan Leis), a handsome Dapper-Dan type, know full well the car's trunk holds more than a spare tire.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2002 | JAN STUART, NEWSDAY
Anyone who still doubts the potential of digital video to enhance the effectiveness of a dramatic film should take a look at "someBody." Henry Barrial's debut feature cannily exploits the cinema verite aspects of the technology as he follows one woman's crawl through the minefield of love. The result is a movie that is so dead-on in its evocation of the games people play that it's hard to tell where real life steps back and art steps in.
BUSINESS
July 9, 2005 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
From the time Amazon.com Inc. sold its first book 10 years ago this month, it strove to offer everything in print. Now, everything in print is just not enough. The world's biggest online retailer said Friday that it had acquired CustomFlix Labs Inc., a small company that creates DVDs on demand. Amazon would not disclose terms of the deal, which came three months after the company bought BookSurge, which does the same thing with books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2009 | Ruben Vives
When Tim Bowler and his wife signed up to become part of the Main Street community garden in Santa Monica, they were eager to get their hands dirty and grow their own vegetables. It took them eight years to get a plot. Lynn Weston waited a decade. Christine Corr waited four years before getting her prized plot of land to garden at the Park Drive community garden. Santa Monica officials say there are simply too many would-be gardeners and too little public garden space.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Fighter" might be called "Two Tough Jews" or "My Squabble With Arnost," but under any name it's a revealing and provocative documentary. Director Amir Bar-Lev finds a way to mix the personal, the philosophical and the historical into a complex human document, something that's funny, moving and sad. The fighter of the title is clearly 77-year-old Jan Weiner, a professor and wilderness guide introduced smartly hitting the heavy bag despite his advanced years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2001 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Like the flowing water it takes its name from, the documentary "Keep the River on Your Right: A Modern Cannibal Tale" meanders, dawdles, doubles back on itself but finally gets us somewhere fascinating and worthwhile.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2006 | Robert W. Welkos;Betsy Sharkey;John Horn
Given their choice of projects, actors will often take a stage performance over a movie. Why? The nearly indescribable feeling of elation that comes from performing live. Director Rodrigo Garcia ("Nine Lives") moderated a coffee talk at midday Sunday at the Geffen Playhouse about the craft of acting. On the panel: Christina Applegate ("Anchorman," "Married With Children"), Kathy Baker ("Nine Lives," "Nip/Tuck") and Joe Mantegna ("Nine Lives," "House of Games").
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 1998 | Kevin Baxter, Kevin Baxter is a Times staff writer
Independent filmmaker Zac Baldwin has been working on his running-themed feature film "To Touch the Wind" for 14 years. Yet after spending years on a screenplay and the equivalent of $65,000 to get a rough cut of the movie on tape, Baldwin seems resigned to the fact that his project may never make it to a theater. "There's a Catch-22," he says. "While there was interest for the finished product, I couldn't get anyone to give me the money to finish it.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2002 | JON HEALEY and P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Call it good, call it bad, but don't call "Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones" a film. Breaking new ground for major motion pictures, "Attack of the Clones" was shot entirely with digital cameras, edited with digital equipment and, for a few dozen theaters, will be distributed and projected digitally. That approach, some industry executives believe, heralds the future of Hollywood and the death of actual "film" making.
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