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Peter Brosius

ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Kidbeat's six years of reviewing theater for young people, the Mark Taper Forum's Improvisational Theatre Project has usually ranked No. 1. This year, top marks go to its production of Lisa Loomer's "Bocon!," a potent blend of Central American mythology and stark reality, staged in dream-like style by ITP artistic director Peter C. Brosius.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1994 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mark Taper Forum's latest P.L.A.Y. (Performing for Los Angeles Youth) production, touring Southland public venues and schools, turns out to work quite nicely as a complement to the clown hit "Fool Moon," finishing its run Sunday at the Doolittle Theatre. "Harold's Big Feat," a short comedy created and performed by Wolfe Bowart and directed by Peter C. Brosius, is billed as "a day in the life of an Everyman clown."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 1989 | LYNNE HEFFLEY
Central American mythology, political reality and a child's fears are potent elements in "Bocon!" the Mark Taper Forum Improvisational Theatre Project's latest play for young people at Barnsdall Art Park's Gallery Theatre in Hollywood. Unlike last year's delicate "The Bear That Wasn't" that played best in small spaces, "Bocon!" has the same large scope of the company's internationally acclaimed "One Thousand Cranes" of two years ago. Children's theater doesn't get much better than this.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 1986 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON
"Scenes From an American Life,'R. Gurney's first full-length play, has its Los Angeles premiere Saturday at the Skylight (it played the South Coast Repertory in 1975). Written in 1970, it was the first of Gurney's major comedic studies on the lives of the rich and WASP-ish, about whom Gurney says, "I hold an affection for, and anger with, the restrictions of their values.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Suzan-Lori Parks is in a curious situation. It took so long for her 1986-89 play, "Imperceptible Mutabilities in the Third Kingdom," to finally receive a full production in Los Angeles that, as she tells it, the play now reflects a chapter of her life that has been securely closed. "Oh yeah, I've moved past that one," she said confidently on the phone from her New York home. "When I did it, it was done, and I moved on."
NEWS
November 7, 1985 | ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Thirty students and four instructors hold hands in a circle. The drama room is quiet, but there is electricity in the air as they begin to squeeze each other's hands. A giggle is heard, then another. "Quiet!" actress Diane Rodriguez says as her eyes scan the circle. "The reason we do this is because this is like acting. You have to learn to concentrate. You have to be ready to do what you're told."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2008 | Lynne Heffley, Times Staff Writer
Larissa FastHorse still looks like a ballet dancer: long-limbed and graceful, delicate face framed by dark curls. But after injuries ended her 10-year ballet career -- "It's a brutal world, there's a lot of blood involved," she says -- FastHorse turned to TV and film writing. Now, she's "coming home" to the theater, gaining notice as a fledgling playwright.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1992 | LYNNE HEFFLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"William Shakespeare has become such an icon, we sometimes forget he was a human being. There had to be something before the plays were written . . . What was this man like as a teen-ager and a young man?" Playwright Greg Atkins is speaking about what inspired his new family play, "William of Stratford," a fully mounted professional work commissioned by Grove Shakespeare through a grant from the Leo Freedman Foundation. It opens Thursday at the Gem Theatre in Garden Grove.
NEWS
December 28, 1985 | ROBERTO RODRIGUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Thirty students and four instructors hold hands in a circle. The drama room is quiet, but there is electricity in the air as they begin to squeeze each other's hands. A giggle is heard, then another. "Quiet!" actress Diane Rodriguez says as her eyes scan the circle. "The reason we do this is because this is like acting. You have to learn to concentrate. You have to be ready to do what you're told."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1989 | JANICE ARKATOV
"I've always been plugged into the wall," Peter Sellars declared. "I love radio. It's where I live, where I come from." It's also where the Los Angeles Festival's artistic director has been spending some of his happiest creative time recently--as a contributor to "The Territory of Art," a 16-part weekly radio series sponsored by the Museum of Contemporary Art and broadcast locally on KCRW-FM (89.9). The program begins its third season today at 10 p.m.
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