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June 4, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wall in the lobby of the U.S. mission here is an honor roll, proudly listing every ambassador and each one's home state, including Adlai Stevenson of Illinois, George Bush of Texas and Bill Richardson of New Mexico. It will probably never bear the name of Peter Burleigh of California. But this West Hollywood native is the de facto U.S. ambassador to the U.N.
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NEWS
June 4, 1999 | JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wall in the lobby of the U.S. mission here is an honor roll, proudly listing every ambassador and each one's home state, including Adlai Stevenson of Illinois, George Bush of Texas and Bill Richardson of New Mexico. It will probably never bear the name of Peter Burleigh of California. But this West Hollywood native is the de facto U.S. ambassador to the U.N.
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NEWS
April 9, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Two decades after breaking diplomatic ties, the U.S. has asked U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan to arrange face-to-face talks with Libya. Peter Burleigh, the U.S. representative to the U.N., said such a meeting would focus on the steps that Libya must take before U.N. sanctions can be lifted permanently. A U.S. official said the issue of resuming diplomatic ties would also probably be raised. On Monday, Libya handed over two suspects in a 1988 Pan Am jet bombing.
NEWS
July 10, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. persuaded Libya's supporters on the Security Council to accept that Tripoli still has to meet U.N. demands related to the Pan Am bombing trial before sanctions can be permanently lifted. Namibia had pushed for a lifting of the measures, now suspended, based on the April 5 hand-over of two suspects in the 1988 bombing and pledges by Libya to cooperate in their trial and pay compensation to the victims' families, if the men are convicted. But the U.S.
NEWS
August 5, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
The last remaining obstacle to Senate confirmation of Richard C. Holbrooke as U.S. ambassador to the United Nations fell as Sen. Charles E. Grassley (R-Iowa) dropped his "hold" on Holbrooke's nomination. With other senators quietly abandoning efforts to hold Holbrooke hostage for unrelated concessions by the administration, Holbrooke's long-stalled confirmation appears inevitable. But it spelled trouble for three of President Clinton's other ambassadorial choices: A.
NEWS
November 29, 1997 | From Associated Press
The Security Council agreed Friday to establish a 300-member international police mission in Haiti to carry on its years-long campaign for democracy in the Caribbean country. The unanimous decision came two days before the last of 1,300 U.N. peacekeepers were to leave Haiti and end a military presence that began in March 1995, when the peacekeepers took over from a U.S. force. Before the vote, U.S.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Butler, the controversial head of the U.N. weapons inspection program in Iraq, said Thursday that he will leave his post when his contract ends in five months. "My contract finishes at the end of June . . . and I don't think that I'll be seeking an extension," he told reporters. Butler's decision is sure to bring joy to Baghdad, which sought to label him as a spy. Two Security Council members--China and Russia--have sharply condemned his blunt style of leadership.
NEWS
February 27, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary-General Kofi Annan told the Security Council on Friday that he is "still reasonably optimistic" that Libya will hand over two suspects in the 1988 bombing of Pan Am Flight 103. "We are now at a critical and delicate state, and I hope we will not have much to go," Annan said as council members, most notably the United States and Britain, expressed frustration at the pace of progress in a plan to turn over the two men for trial in the Netherlands.
NEWS
July 8, 1999 | From Reuters
Britain said Wednesday that it was reopening diplomatic relations with Libya after 15 years because Tripoli had agreed to cooperate in investigations into the fatal shooting in 1984 of a British policewoman outside the Libyan Embassy here. Foreign Secretary Robin Cook said Libya also agreed to pay compensation for the killing, which led Britain to suspend ties between the two countries.
NEWS
November 24, 1998 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iraq rejected on Monday a request for new documents on its program to build weapons of mass destruction, and launched a fresh attack on Richard Butler, chairman of the U.N. commission charged with finding them. "We don't have any more documents that we believe are related to disarmament at this point," Iraqi Ambassador Nizar Hamdoun said at United Nations headquarters. The Baghdad government sent an 18-page letter to the Security Council to underscore the point.
NEWS
September 24, 1998 | CRAIG TURNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the door to potential military intervention by the United States and its European allies, the U.N. Security Council on Wednesday adopted a resolution calling for an immediate cease-fire in the separatist Serbian province of Kosovo. The measure was adopted on the second day of a new offensive by Serbian forces in Kosovo that the U.N. says has added 6,000 more refugees to the more than 270,000 people already displaced in the region. U.N.
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