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Peter Coyote

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 1987 | RODERICK MANN
The other night in Santa Monica, Peter Coyote and his wife went to see his new movie, "A Man in Love." The film broke down twice, once for 15 minutes. There was, he says, no apology of any sort. "Is it any wonder," he asked afterward, "why people are often discouraged from going to see movies?" But that, after all, was a minor inconvenience. The sense of deep frustration that has plagued this articulate actor since the film's opening has nothing to do with projection room problems.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
I appreciated Susan King's long and positive article on Jean-Paul Rappeneau's wonderful film "Bon Voyage" ("Revisiting a Fateful Time in 1940 France," March 22). I was sorry that the only negative note in the entire piece was her gratuitous observation that I had a "bad French accent." Perhaps if she had noticed that I was not playing an American journalist as she reported but an English journalist, and speaking French with the cadences of an Englishman, she might have been more charitable.
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NEWS
June 4, 1998 | LOUISE STEINMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where were you in the summer of 1967? If, like actor Peter Coyote, you were on the liberated turf of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, you could "sing, beg, get high, cruise for sex, plot the overthrow of the government, be mad, or do what you chose." In his new memoir, "Sleeping Where I Fall" (Counterpoint), Coyote describes that global moment when "a feeling of potential charged the air like pollen . . . and ideas seemed nourishing enough to sustain life."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Coyote has a litmus test when it comes to choosing roles. If he reads 10 pages of a script and doesn't find the story intriguing or the dialogue "surprising or alive, quirky or real," then "it's out the window." That is, unless he's broke. "In which case my sense of discretion is put to sleep and my standards will go to whatever level will pay my rent," muses the youthful and strikingly handsome 58-year-old actor in a recent interview.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Peter Coyote is lying on his living room sofa recounting a dream he just had. It is three weeks after Neil Simon's new show, "Jake's Women," opened at the Old Globe Theatre to terrible reviews. Coyote, who plays Jake, swears the dream really happened. "The scene is some kind of game show. There's a big screen in the background and an announcer is telling three befuddled contestants, 'You've all heard about the recent debacle of Neil Simon's new show. Now for $25,000, who is to blame?'
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | Michael Wilmington
French director Diane Kurys, an expert at intimate emotions, made her English language debut in this steamy, rich 1987 backstage romance starring Peter Coyote as an intense, arrogant American film star who becomes involved with his co-star, a Parisian stage actress (Greta Scachi, pictured with Coyote), while filming in Rome. With Jamie Lee Curtis, Claudia Cardinale and Peter Reigert. A&E Wednesday at 1 p.m., early Thursday at 1 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2004
I appreciated Susan King's long and positive article on Jean-Paul Rappeneau's wonderful film "Bon Voyage" ("Revisiting a Fateful Time in 1940 France," March 22). I was sorry that the only negative note in the entire piece was her gratuitous observation that I had a "bad French accent." Perhaps if she had noticed that I was not playing an American journalist as she reported but an English journalist, and speaking French with the cadences of an Englishman, she might have been more charitable.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
** "Stacking." Charter. $79.98. PG. This 1987 film, about a young girl's coming of age on a Montana farm in 1954, has some of the evocative, pared-down detail of a good short story. Writer Victoria Jenkins, working in the vein of "Places in the Heart" or "Country," pits her plucky 14-year-old heroine against desperate finances and a crumbling family. But the admirable parts don't coalesce into an effective whole.
BOOKS
October 11, 1998 | J. HOBERMAN, J. Hoberman is senior film critic at the Village Voice and author of "Bridge of Light: Yiddish Film Between Two Worlds" and "The Red Atlantis: Communist Culture in the Absence of Communism" (forthcoming from Temple University Press)
Some years ago, I heard through the family grapevine that a young relative had renounced everything, including the religion of his fathers, for an obscure New Age sect. Despite myself I felt annoyed. You want to join a cult, fine--why not a useful one like the Communist Party? The most seductive secular faith of the short 20th century was communism (in all its poignant, savage and self-deluded permutations). The appeal was not solely utopian.
NEWS
June 4, 1998 | LOUISE STEINMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Where were you in the summer of 1967? If, like actor Peter Coyote, you were on the liberated turf of San Francisco's Haight-Ashbury, you could "sing, beg, get high, cruise for sex, plot the overthrow of the government, be mad, or do what you chose." In his new memoir, "Sleeping Where I Fall" (Counterpoint), Coyote describes that global moment when "a feeling of potential charged the air like pollen . . . and ideas seemed nourishing enough to sustain life."
BOOKS
May 24, 1998
Frank Hotchkiss, architect: "W.B Yeats: The Poems," edited by Daniel Albright (J.M. Dent & Sons). "Albright has edited a wonderful collection of Yeats, almost half of which is a gloss on his influences--Celtic myths, Irish history, the love affairs. The poems are, of course, entrancing and come to life with these deft explorations." **** Patricia Sullivan, marketing executive: "On the Road," by Jack Kerouac (Penguin).
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | VERNON SCOTT, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Peter Coyote, namesake of the wily canines that thrive in the hills above Hollywood, similarly is a survivor in the thickets and bracken of the studios down on the flatlands. Coyote is a non-star, an actor who picks off plum roles but who rarely gets top billing. In "Die Laughing," "The Pursuit of D. B. Cooper" and others, including "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial," "Cross Creek" and "Jagged Edge," Coyote made enormous contributions to the success of the films, but not as the star.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 2, 1988 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Recent releases, reviewed by Times critics. ; Compiled by Terry Atkinson
**** 'The Book of Job." Translation by Stephen Mitchell. Read by Peter Coyote. One cassette unabridged. Audio Literature Inc., 3800 Palos Verdes Way, South San Francisco 94080. Updating the Bible, King James or Douay version, has been a mixed blessing. The latter-day translations too often lose the poetry along with the archaisms. Current Catholic liturgy, for example, turns the "green pastures" of Psalm 23 into the tone-deaf "verdant fields."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1990 | VERNON SCOTT, UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL
Peter Coyote, namesake of the wily canines that thrive in the hills above Hollywood, similarly is a survivor in the thickets and bracken of the studios down on the flatlands. Coyote is a non-star, an actor who picks off plum roles but who rarely gets top billing. In "Die Laughing," "The Pursuit of D. B. Cooper" and others, including "E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial," "Cross Creek" and "Jagged Edge," Coyote made enormous contributions to the success of the films, but not as the star.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | Michael Wilmington
French director Diane Kurys, an expert at intimate emotions, made her English language debut in this steamy, rich 1987 backstage romance starring Peter Coyote as an intense, arrogant American film star who becomes involved with his co-star, a Parisian stage actress (Greta Scachi, pictured with Coyote), while filming in Rome. With Jamie Lee Curtis, Claudia Cardinale and Peter Reigert. A&E Wednesday at 1 p.m., early Thursday at 1 a.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 1990 | BARBARA ISENBERG
Peter Coyote is lying on his living room sofa recounting a dream he just had. It is three weeks after Neil Simon's new show, "Jake's Women," opened at the Old Globe Theatre to terrible reviews. Coyote, who plays Jake, swears the dream really happened. "The scene is some kind of game show. There's a big screen in the background and an announcer is telling three befuddled contestants, 'You've all heard about the recent debacle of Neil Simon's new show. Now for $25,000, who is to blame?'
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