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Peter Gabriel

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October 4, 2012
It's all too easy in the age of "American Idol" to forget just how profoundly powerful music can be in the hands of an absolute master like Peter Gabriel. The veteran British artist — one of the select few in the pop music world to whom the term "artist" is wholly appropriate —demonstrates again and again his completely inspired command of the medium of live performance. Hollywood Bowl, 2301 N. Highland Ave., L.A. 8 p.m. Sat. $50-$275. hollywoodbowl.com
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2014 | By Randy Lewis
Few fans have been more vocal about their favorite group's long absence from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame than those in the KISS Army, but now that the long-running hard rock outfit is being inducted, members have decided to opt out of performing at this year's ceremony. The problem? Deciding which incarnation of KISS would perform. In a statement released Sunday, members of the current version of the band said they wanted “ to celebrate the entire history of KISS and give credit to all members” who have played with the group over the years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
PETER GABRIEL has always roamed the sector between art and science. "My father was an electrical engineer," the English musician said, "and while I didn't inherit his talent for invention, I did pick up a love of innovation, a passion for finding the next."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis, Los Angeles Times
In the same year that Linda Ronstadt told the world she could no longer sing a note because of Parkinson's disease, she has been elected to the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a possibility that she recently told the Los Angeles Times she'd never "given a second thought to. " Ronstadt, 67, is one of six new members who will be formally inducted next year, along with Peter Gabriel, KISS, Hall and Oates, Nirvana and Cat Stevens. Acts that made the final ballot but did not make the cut for induction are Yes, N.W.A, Chic, the Meters, Deep Purple, the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, LL Cool J, the Replacements, Link Wray and the Zombies.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2008 | Randy Lewis, Times Staff Writer
OK, so cut Peter Gabriel some slack for taking too long to finish an album: "Big Blue Ball," a long-simmering world music project he launched back in 1991, is finally surfacing today. In the intervening 17 years, he's released four other collections of his music, launched an innovative U.K.-based music download website (www.We7 .com), continued nurturing WOMAD, the world music and dance festival he initiated in 1982 and started a lifestyle-driven site (thefilter.com).
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 2010
Peter Gabriel "Scratch My Back" Real World . There seems to be two motivations behind Peter Gabriel's new album, one playful and the other more serious. The first gives the project its title: Gabriel covered compositions by 12 working artists, including David Bowie, Neil Young, Arcade Fire and the Magnetic Fields. He also invited them to plumb his own catalog for an upcoming answer record titled "I'll Scratch Yours." Some have called this proposition opportunistic, a way for Gabriel to both reassert his place alongside more iconic elders and make a DNA connection with arty youngsters.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country's rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn't allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela's jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela's messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
It's finally showdown time in the record business over the controversial CD longbox. If longbox foes and supporters agree on anything, it's that the true test of the longbox's future would come when a major rock star put out a CD without its bulky 6x12-inch package. The future is now.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1986 | RICHARD CROMELIN
Somewhere between Bowie and Bruce, you'll find Peter Gabriel. At his Forum concert Monday, the English singer didn't flash Bowie-style glamour and theatricality, but he showed that he knows how to stylize a performance. And while he lacks Springsteen's force and charisma, he established a similar intimacy with the audience. When you spread your arms and fall backwards off the stage into the crowd, you'd better have a good relationship with them.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 1986 | ROBERT HILBURN
"It was the most exciting show I ever saw. It was in this small, underground club in London and . . . the whole place was lit up. I was going to this conservative school and this was a totally alien and extremely exciting world. . . . This big man on the stage with this enormous soul. I was thinking this must be as exciting as it gets."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2013 | By Reed Johnson and Randall Roberts
On “Graceland,” his 1986 Grammy Award-winning album, Paul Simon sang a secular lullaby that could've been addressed to the oppressed black multitudes of apartheid South Africa and their moral leader, Nelson Mandela. “These are the days of lasers in the jungle,” Simon intoned on the album's lead-off track, “The Boy in the Bubble.” “These are the days of miracle and wonder / And don't cry baby, don't cry.” Although the ambiguous lyrics seem to refer to a broader human condition, they also evoke the aspirations that were roiling South Africa in the mid-1980s and that Mandela embodied, both within his country and to the outside world.  FULL COVERAGE: Nelson Mandela (1918-2013)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
Nelson Mandela was, quite famously, a fan of European classical music. His two favorite composers were George Frideric Handel and Pyotr Ilych Tchaikovsky, but he grew up exposed to the country's rich tradition of vocal groups forging a unique form of sacred rhythm music. That changed while the former South African president and longtime democratic activist was imprisoned by the pro-apartheid government from 1962 to 1990. He wasn't allowed access to music. Artists, however, used Mandela's jailing to fuel global protest songs, and during his years in captivity, Mandela's messages were delivered on the wings of rhythm and melody.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
It's almost inconceivable today, but a generation ago, some of the biggest pop music events in the history of the planet came and went with no commercially available evidence left behind. That curious fact is brought to the fore with this week's first-ever home video release of “¡Released!” -- separate DVD and CD sets highlighting performances from four-star-packed Amnesty International concerts and tours that sprang up from 1986 to 1998. Those events brought out high-profile supporters including Bruce Springsteen, Sting, U2, Peter Gabriel, Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Joan Baez, Miles Davis, Sinead O'Connor, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant and many more.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
Two-thirds of the Police -- guitarist Andy Summers and drummer Stewart Copeland -- will be reunited on Sunday to talk about their role in Amnesty International's benefit concerts at the world premiere of “Released!” a new concert films with highlights from two AI tours and two other individual benefit shows from 1986 to 1999. Strictly by coincidence, the third member of the trio - Sting - happens to be in the area to perform Monday, Nov. 4, at Magicopolis in Santa Monica, but there's no word on whether he could  join his former band mates at the screening.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 8, 2012 | By Randy Lewis
Peter Gabriel long ago established himself as a master at merging music, image and theater, going back to his watershed music videos at the dawn of MTV in the '80s, and before that with the ambitious stage productions he and the members of prog-rock band Genesis assembled in the '70s. During his performance Saturday at the Hollywood Bowl, the singer, songwriter, artist and political activist was at the heart of another confluence of music, memory and imagery when actor John Cusack wandered onstage with a large boombox.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 2010 | By Kevin Berger, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's safe to say that if Renee Fleming appeared on "American Idol" and sang "Hallelujah," the Leonard Cohen song immortalized by Jeff Buckley, and a favorite of "Idol" contestants, judges Randy Jackson and Kara DioGuardi would not say she is "pitchy." "Thank you!" exclaimed the opera star, laughing. Dialing down her soprano to a tenor, Fleming sings a tender version of "Hallelujah" on her surprising new album, "Dark Hope," a set of rock songs by artists including the Arcade Fire, Band of Horses and Death Cab for Cutie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1992 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Not quite revealing enough to register squarely in the confessional genre, "Us" might nonetheless be considered Peter Gabriel's "therapy album." And it's not dysfunctional. Temporarily setting aside his social conscience, Gabriel is using the title pronoun not in the we-are-the-world sense, but as an umbrella for writing about couples and about his own failed relationships.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2010
BOOKS Greil Marcus In his new book, "When That Rough God Goes Riding: Listening to Van Morrison," formidable cultural critic Marcus waxes reverential on the Celtic bluesman's initially ignored, now-iconic "Astral Weeks," yet dismisses 16 albums' worth of Morrison's music from 1980 to 1996 as "characterless" and forgettable. Fighting words, to be sure, for Van Morrison's legion of devotees; but the author of "Lipstick Traces" and "The Old, Weird America" is nothing if not willfully idiosyncratic when it comes to writing about the legends of rock 'n' roll he adores.
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